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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Dinesh Rathi and Lisa M. Given

This paper aims to present findings from a study conducted with non-profit organizations (NPOs) in Canada and Australia, focusing on the use of tools and technologies for…

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2580

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present findings from a study conducted with non-profit organizations (NPOs) in Canada and Australia, focusing on the use of tools and technologies for knowledge management (KM). NPOs of different sizes and operating in different sectors were studied in two large-scale national surveys. The paper is useful to both practitioners in NPOs for understanding tool use for KM activities and to scholars to further develop the KM-NPO domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Two nation-wide surveys were conducted with Canadian and Australian NPOs of different sizes (i.e. very small to large-sized organizations) and operating in different sectors (e.g. animal welfare, education and research, culture and arts). An analysis of responses explores the use of tools and technologies by NPOs. Respondents identified the tools and technologies they used from nine pre-determined themes (quantitative data) plus an additional category of “other tools” (qualitative data), which allowed for free text responses. The quantitative data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques and the qualitative data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach.

Findings

Quantitative data analysis provides key findings including the popularity of physical, print documents across all NPO sizes and sectors. Statistical tests revealed, for example, there is no significant difference for the same-sized organizations in Canadian and Australian NPOs in the use of tools and technologies for KM activities. However, there were differences in the use of tools and technologies across different sizes of NPOs. The qualitative analysis revealed a number of additional tools and technologies and also provided contextual details about the nature of tool use. The paper provides specific examples of the types of tools and technologies NPOs use.

Originality/value

The paper has both practical and academic contributions, including areas for future research. The findings on the use of KM tools and technologies by NPOs contribute to the growing body of literature in the KM domain in general and also build the literature base for the understudied KM-NPO domain. NPOs will also find the paper useful in better understanding tools and technological implementation for KM activities. The study is unique not only in the content focus on KM for NPOs but also for the comparative study of activities in two countries.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2005

Gloria J. Leckie and Lisa M. Given

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society…

Abstract

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society. From its early days as a subscription service for the middle-class, through its evolution to become an educational site for the lower-classes and new immigrants, the public library has served as a touch-stone for urban industrial society in North America (Lerner, 1998, p. 138; Shera, 1974). Over the past century, public libraries have evolved to respond to the growing needs of the communities they serve and continue to do so with recent advances in technologies (such as DVDs, electronic books, the Internet, etc.), and with a more global outlook on the ways that people seek and share information. Indeed, the public library's constituents today are exceedingly diverse, including children and adults from a broad range of socio-economic, cultural, and educational backgrounds, all of whom seek information for a variety of personal and work-related purposes. The fact that public libraries have been fulfilling patrons' information needs for well over a century is a testament to their enduring success and versatility as information providers, and also points to the overall effectiveness of public librarians as intermediaries in the provision process.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-629-8

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Dinesh Rathi, Lisa M. Given and Eric Forcier

This paper aims to present findings from a study of non-profit organizations (NPOs), including a model of knowledge needs that can be applied by practitioners and scholars…

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3035

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present findings from a study of non-profit organizations (NPOs), including a model of knowledge needs that can be applied by practitioners and scholars to further develop the NPO sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with NPOs operating in Canada and Australia. An analysis of survey responses identified the different types of knowledge essential for each organization. Respondents identified the importance of three pre-determined themes (quantitative data) related to knowledge needs, as well as a fourth option, which was a free text box (qualitative data). The quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analyses and a grounded theory approach, respectively.

Findings

Analysis of the quantitative data indicates that NPOs ' needs are comparable in both countries. Analysis of qualitative data identified five major categories and multiple sub-categories representing the types of knowledge needs of NPOs. Major categories are knowledge about management and organizational practices, knowledge about resources, community knowledge, sectoral knowledge and situated knowledge. The paper discusses the results using semantic proximity and presents an emergent, evidence-based knowledge management (KM)-NPO model.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the growing body of literature in the KM domain, and in the understudied research domain related to the knowledge needs and experiences of NPOs. NPOs will find the identified categories and sub-categories useful to undertake KM initiatives within their individual organizations. The study is also unique, as it includes data from two countries, Canada and Australia.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Elizabeth (Bess) Sadler and Lisa M. Given

This study seeks to apply ecological psychology's concept of “affordance” to graduate students' information behavior in the academic library, and to explore the extent to…

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6241

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to apply ecological psychology's concept of “affordance” to graduate students' information behavior in the academic library, and to explore the extent to which the affordances experienced by graduate students differed from the affordances librarians were attempting to provide.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth, qualitative interviews with graduate students and academic librarians explored how the students perceived and used the library's various “opportunities for action” (e.g. books, databases, instructional sessions, librarians, physical space, etc.) and compared these perceptions and behavior with librarians' intentions and expectations.

Findings

Findings indicate a disparity between expectations and experience and point to graduate students as an underserved population in this context, especially in terms of the library's outreach efforts. In addition, because graduate students are increasingly teaching introductory undergraduate courses, communication methods that bypass graduate students tend to miss undergraduate students as well.

Practical implications

Practical implications discussed in this paper include possible methods of improving communication channels between graduate students and academic librarians, and considerations for information literacy instruction.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique perspective by using affordance theory to frame students and librarians' expectations about library services. The findings are particularly valuable for their implications for library‐patron communication and information literacy.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Dinesh Rathi, Lisa M. Given and Eric Forcier

This paper aims first to identify key interorganisational partnership types among non-profit organisations (NPOs) and second to determine how knowledge sharing takes place…

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3871

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims first to identify key interorganisational partnership types among non-profit organisations (NPOs) and second to determine how knowledge sharing takes place within each type of partnership. Results explore the value of social media specifically in facilitating external relationships between NPOs, firms and the communities they serve.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical qualitative analysis of exploratory interviews with 16 Canadian NPOs generates a non-exhaustive classification of partnership types emerging from these organisations, and their defining characteristics in the context of interorganisational knowledge sharing.

Findings

Overall eight categories of partnerships from the sampled NPOs emerged from the analysis of the data. These include business partnerships, sector partnerships, community partnerships, government partnerships, expert partnerships, endorsement partnerships, charter partnerships and hybrid partnerships. Using examples from interviews, the sharing of knowledge within each of these partnerships is defined uniquely in terms of directionality (i.e. uni-directional, bi-directional, multi-directional knowledge sharing) and formality (i.e. informal, semi-formal or formal knowledge sharing).Specific practices within these relationships also arise from examples, in particular, the use of social media to support informal and community-driven collaborations. Twitter, as a popular social networking tool, emerges as a preferred medium that supports interorganisational partnerships relevant to NPOs.

Originality/value

This research is valuable in identifying the knowledge management practices unique to NPOs. By examining and discussing specific examples of partnerships encountered among NPOs, this paper contributes original findings about the implications of interorganisational knowledge sharing, as well as the impact of emerging social technologies on same.

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Philip Hider, Lisa M. Given and Paul Scifleet

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of an audit of community information (CI) portals to provide an overview of how CI is being organised and presented…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of an audit of community information (CI) portals to provide an overview of how CI is being organised and presented on the web by aggregating services, and how CI is being shaped and shared in community networks. It also investigates the role that public libraries play in online CI provision.

Design/methodology/approach

The research sampled CI portals online within the Australian web domain (.au). An audit of 88 portals was undertaken to establish the scope, role and usefulness of the portals. The audit included a comprehensive usability analysis of a sub set of 20 portals evaluated for 20 different heuristics based on Nielsen's heuristic model.

Findings

The research finds that the challenge facing portals is not a lack of information, it is the need to improve the mediation between the community services and people that CI portals promise useful and usable information for. While public libraries remain integral to the provision of CI in their geographical area, they now form part of a larger online network for CI provision, involving a wide range of organisations.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the ways CI portals contribute to the provision of information about community services and identifies areas where improvements are needed. In particular, it discusses how these sites function as part of larger CI networks and where more innovative, and more standardised, design could lead to greater levels of engagement and utility.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Muhammad Shahrul Ifwat Ishak and Md. Habibur Rahman

This paper aims to explore the potential application of mudharabah (silent partnership) as an investment instrument through an Islamic crowdfunding platform.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the potential application of mudharabah (silent partnership) as an investment instrument through an Islamic crowdfunding platform.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study in which semi-structured interviews were carried out with several experts regarding the application of mudharabah in Islamic crowdfunding. To achieve the purpose of this study, the data is analysed based on thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that even though Islamic crowdfunding could be an efficient platform through financial technology (Fintech), mudharabah is not an entirely ideal instrument, particularly for equity-based Islamic crowdfunding because of its high risk. These include fraudulent projects, insufficient regulations to protect investors’ money and the structure of mudharabah itself in which it is in the form of profit-sharing contract. However, the risk can be mitigated by using Fintech as a way to closely monitor the project, enhancing regulatory aspects to protect investment funds, enhancing mudharabah practice and creating awareness among all involving parties in terms of mudharabah philosophy.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited because it focuses on the current practice of Islamic crowdfunding in Malaysia, given that it is still a new industry. Currently, there is only one Islamic registered equity crowdfunding platform. Also, as the number of interviewees in this study is limited because of purposive sampling, the findings may be considered the result of an exploratory study.

Practical implications

An equity Islamic crowdfunding platform based on mudharabah can be proposed, particularly to support micro enterprises in which they involve small capital. Also, this model can be considered for less risky ventures such as investment in food industries or technology sectors.

Social implications

Mudharabah Islamic crowdfunding model could potentially support local businesses, especially for start-ups. By channelling money among society, it is not only creating a wealth circulation among society, which is one of the Sharīʿah objectives in finance, but it also promotes mutual cooperation and kindness among society members.

Originality/value

While Islamic crowdfunding is not a new topic in research, it lacks empirical studies, particularly qualitative analysis. As this study engages with experts in Sharīʿah and crowdfunding regarding the potential application of mudharabah, it highlights a fresh discussion both in theory and practice.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Tara Brabazon, Tiffany Lyndall-Knight and Natalie Hills

Abstract

Details

The Creative PhD: Challenges, Opportunities, Reflection
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-790-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Muhammad Shahrul Ifwat Ishak, Muhammad Huzaifah Kamaruddin and Abdulmajeed Muhammad Raji Aderemi

This paper aims to explore the applicability of mudharabah (partnership) based crowdfunding as an alternative fund to support the book publishing industry, particularly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the applicability of mudharabah (partnership) based crowdfunding as an alternative fund to support the book publishing industry, particularly for self-publishers and small publishers.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory qualitative study whereby the data are obtained from library research and empirical studies. As for empirical data, it is sourced from semi-structured interviews with three types of groups: the book industry, the crowdfunding platform and Shari’ah experts.

Findings

The study found that mudharabah crowdfunding could overcome the book publishing industry’s financial problems. However, this requires special requirements for applicants (writers or publishers) to avoid fraudulent cases, as well as committed management in running the platform and a substantial crowd of loyal funders to maintain the platform. Simultaneously, even though mudharabah is a risky instrument, the risk can be mitigated by closely monitoring the progress of the project. As a result, this study proposes a special framework for mudharabah based crowdfunding to fund self-publishers and small publishers in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study, in which its findings may not be generalised due to the limited number of participants.

Practical implications

A special model for mudharabah based crowdfunding can be established through an online platform to support book publishing in Malaysia.

Social implications

As this mudharabah crowdfunding model has the potential to support the book industry financially, it could also nurture talented young writers while also preserving knowledge.

Originality/value

This study highlights a fresh and in-depth discussion both in theory and practice in proposing a special Islamic crowdfunding framework based on mudharabah as an alternative fund for the book industry, particularly to support self- and small publishers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2005

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-629-8

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