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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Linda I. Nowak and Judith H. Washburn

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the existence and strength of the relationship between proactive environmental policies and brand equity for the winery. Results of this…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the existence and strength of the relationship between proactive environmental policies and brand equity for the winery. Results of this study suggest that consumer perceptions about product quality, consumer trust, consumer perceptions about pricing, and positive expectations for the consequences of the winery's actions undertaking the pro‐environmental policies, all have strong, positive relationships with the winery's brand equity. Trust in the winery and brand equity for the winery increased significantly when the winery in this study adopted proactive environmental business policies.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Sandra K. Newton, Linda I. Nowak and Mayuresh Kelkar

The purpose of this study is to investigate the range of explanations for why wine club members defect and move on.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the range of explanations for why wine club members defect and move on.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research study uses data from US wine consumers, gathered through an online survey of 399 former wine club members who had quit their membership in the recent past. Consistent with literature on customer churn rates in subscription markets, data are analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, hierarchical multiple regression and analysis of variance.

Findings

The results reported by respondents indicate that higher levels of perceived product quality, fair value in pricing, variety seeking and commitment to customer service at the beginning and at the end of a wine club membership lead to higher levels of customer satisfaction and a desire to recommend the club to others even after quitting. Though variety seeking is more commonplace among experienced wine drinkers, the good news for wineries is that consumers are more likely to recommend a wine club to others if at least a year has passed after they decided to quit.

Practical implications

The results provide implications for wine club managers seeking to improve wine club retention with suggested means for mitigating the rate of customer attrition.

Originality/value

This paper presents original research addressing a variety of reasons why wine club members quit. The extant research has found that factors such as product quality, fair pricing, service commitments and variety-seeking behavior affect members’ satisfaction with their wine club, as well as their desire to recommend it to others. The authors have attempted to combine all these factors into a single study to gain insight into wine club members’ switching behavior, and to find out what the wineries can do to improve customer loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Linda I. Nowak and Sandra K. Newton

The purpose of this research is to determine if positive affect, in combination with product quality, fair pricing, and customer‐focused operations leads to higher levels of…

4176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine if positive affect, in combination with product quality, fair pricing, and customer‐focused operations leads to higher levels of customer satisfaction and repurchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 89 undergraduate and graduate business students, ages 23 to 59, each visited a winery they had never visited before. Afterward they filled out a questionnaire evaluating the winery on product quality, fair pricing, feelings of commitment towards the winery, positive emotions felt, preference for wine, overall customer satisfaction, and repurchase intentions. Data were analyzed using multiple regression. Repurchase behavior was the dependent variable.

Findings

Product quality, positive emotions felt, preference for wine, customer commitment, and fair pricing were all significant predictors of repurchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a small sample of 89 business students. Future research could replicate this study with larger samples of both marginal and core wine drinkers.

Practical implications

The results of this research empirically support the anecdotal evidence that through positive tasting room experiences, wineries can cultivate relationships with customers that build commitment and loyalty. The quality of the wine is not everything. Customers have many choices. The total experience at the winery, one in which the customer feels a sense of belonging and camaraderie and in which the experience is fun or exciting, contributes to repurchase intentions.

Originality/value

This is the first time that customer emotions have been measured after a tasting room visit and then tested for their relationship with repurchase intentions.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Linda I. Nowak and Sandra Newton

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of Millennial wine consumers and determine if positive evaluations of the winery's web site lead to increased trust in the…

1789

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of Millennial wine consumers and determine if positive evaluations of the winery's web site lead to increased trust in the winery and perceptions of product quality, higher levels of brand equity, and increased purchase intentions. The tasting room experience will be evaluated for consistency with the image created by the web site and the meeting of Millennial expectations during the web site visit.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 122 young people (Millennials) with an average age of 23 were asked to visit winery web sites and then evaluate the web sites for quality and perceptions formed relating to the overall image of the winery and its products. The participants were then asked to visit the winery and evaluate their winery experience and its products.

Findings

Web site quality was a significant predictor of increased trust in the winery and perceptions of the quality of the wine. Web site evaluations of brand equity carried over to influence evaluations of brand equity after the tasting room experience. When visiting the winery, the more the customers' expectations were exceeded, the higher the level of customer satisfaction with the tasting room experience.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings were based on a small convenience sample of 122 undergraduate US business students from Northern California. Future research should study larger and more diverse samples of the Millennial consumer.

Practical implications

Wine brands attempting to attract the Millennial customer should consider paying close attention to the design, development, and maintenance of a web site that appeals to the savvy Millennial consumer.

Originality/value

The potential for web sites to impact young adults' perceptions of the winery's image, trust in the winery, perceptions of wine quality, and intentions to visit the winery based on these perceptions has not previously been examined.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Linda I. Nowak and Judith H. Washburn

In today’s increasingly competitive environment, it is important to measure the service firm’s performance in the areas which contribute most significantly to the client’s overall…

1995

Abstract

In today’s increasingly competitive environment, it is important to measure the service firm’s performance in the areas which contribute most significantly to the client’s overall satisfaction. Previous research indicates that marketing research clients are concerned with a research provider’s performance in four areas; product quality, service quality, cost management, and timeliness. A survey of 155 marketing research clients indicated that these clients perceive product quality as being most important in accomplishing their research objectives, followed in order by service quality, cost, and timeliness. The results of the study indicate that less than half of the clients were completely satisfied with the ability of their primary research supplier to save them money or to provide them with a useful analysis. A research provider that is capable of improving performance in these two areas may be able to create a competitive advantage that could lead to increased client satisfaction and improved customer loyalty. These research findings provide insights for other business services in assessing client needs and tracking client satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Brian D. Till and Linda I. Nowak

Companies have become increasingly active in developing relationships between their brands and popular causes in such areas as the environment (e.g. nature conservancy) and health…

10275

Abstract

Companies have become increasingly active in developing relationships between their brands and popular causes in such areas as the environment (e.g. nature conservancy) and health issues (e.g. breast cancer awareness crusade). As such alliances become a more important strategic component of the brand’s marketing mix, managers seek direction as to how to generate the most impact with these tie‐ins. This article uses associative learning principles as a framework for understanding how to facilitate building connections between brands and causes so as to increase the value of this highly visible marketing activity. Specific associative learning principles are detailed and applied, improving the use of cause‐related marketing alliances.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Linda I. Nowak

Reports how, in an effort to improve research quality, save time and decrease total costs, many businesses have been turning from discrete, arm’s‐length, transactional…

730

Abstract

Reports how, in an effort to improve research quality, save time and decrease total costs, many businesses have been turning from discrete, arm’s‐length, transactional relationships with a multitude of research suppliers towards long‐term, collaborative relationships with just a few research “partners”. Some bank clients believe in the benefits of partnering with one or two marketing research suppliers. Other bank clients are concerned that partnering with researchers will breed complacency, thus increasing research costs and decreasing quality. Attempts to examine the impact of partnering and non‐partnering relationships on the research firms’ performance in three areas: service quality, product quality and overall customer satisfaction. Empirical evidence indicates a positive relationship between partnering and increased client satisfaction in all three areas.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Linda Nowak, Philip McGongh and Thomas Atkin

This study empirically examines the impact that statements on wine labels directing consumers “to learn the health effects of wine consumption, send for the Federal Government's…

Abstract

This study empirically examines the impact that statements on wine labels directing consumers “to learn the health effects of wine consumption, send for the Federal Government's Dietary Guidelines for Americans” may potentially have on attitudes and wine consumption intentions in college students both over and under the legal drinking age. The results of the study suggest that directional statements on wine labels will not have a significant impact on attitudes toward alcohol, the wine brand, disease risk, label believability, or purchase intention. The results, however, do show that college students both over and under the legal drinking age perceived the winery with the directional statement on the label as more “socially concerned” than the winery that did not use the statement.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Linda Nowak, Liz Thach and Janeen E. Olsen

The purpose of the study is to examine the attitudes of millennial wine consumers and determine if positive affect in tasting room situations leads to higher levels of brand…

8077

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the attitudes of millennial wine consumers and determine if positive affect in tasting room situations leads to higher levels of brand equity for the winery.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed to evaluate winery tasting room experiences based on standardized brand measurement scales. In total 80 millennials visited tasting rooms and then completed the survey to evaluate their experience.

Findings

The results of this research empirically support the anecdotal evidence that, through positive emotions associated with the tasting room experiences, wineries can cultivate relationships with millennial customers that may lead to long‐term, profitable relationships through continued patronage and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

Practical application of this study suggests that carefully orchestrating a tasting room experience to create a positive experience for the millennial customer appears to be a critical component of post‐purchase attitudes and building brand equity. In addition, customer commitment, product quality, service quality, and fair pricing are also significant predictors of brand equity.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Jo En Yap, Michael B. Beverland and Liliana L. Bove

Purpose – The objectives of this study are to explore how consumers achieve, maintain, and/or regain privacy and to more fully understand the meaning consumers ascribe to…

Abstract

Purpose – The objectives of this study are to explore how consumers achieve, maintain, and/or regain privacy and to more fully understand the meaning consumers ascribe to privacy.

Methodology/approach – Image-elicited depth interviews were conducted on a theoretical sample of 23 informants.

Findings – Consumers are active participants who assert their dominance in the marketplace and resist organizational practices that impinge upon their privacy. Seven categories of privacy management practices were identified: withdraw, defend, feint, neutralize, attack, perception management, and reconcile. The findings also reveal that when informants desire privacy and engage in these practices, they are ultimately in a quest for the meta-goal of sovereignty over their respective personal domains.

Research limitations/implications – This study provides support for and expands upon knowledge of the privacy management practices identified in extant literature, and offers an encompassing conceptualization of privacy as it applies in the context of contemporary consumption.

Social implications – This study may assist policy makers and managers in their efforts to develop appropriate solutions to manage consumers’ privacy concerns and support them in their pursuit of privacy.

Originality/value of the paper – This study injects the voice of the consumer into the privacy debate. A broad theoretical framework for understanding what consumers mean when they talk about privacy and the practices they engage in to “do privacy” is presented. It is hoped that this study provides a basis for managing consumer privacy concerns and future research on the issue so that improved outcomes can be attained for all.

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