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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Linda I. Nowak and Judith H. Washburn

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the existence and strength of the relationship between proactive environmental policies and brand equity for the winery. Results…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the existence and strength of the relationship between proactive environmental policies and brand equity for the winery. Results of this study suggest that consumer perceptions about product quality, consumer trust, consumer perceptions about pricing, and positive expectations for the consequences of the winery's actions undertaking the pro‐environmental policies, all have strong, positive relationships with the winery's brand equity. Trust in the winery and brand equity for the winery increased significantly when the winery in this study adopted proactive environmental business policies.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Yohan Bernard, Véronique Collange, Aurore Ingarao and Sarra Zarrouk-Karoui

The purpose of this paper is to better understand an increasingly widespread practice consisting, of a brand, in signaling the domestic origin of its products aimed at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand an increasingly widespread practice consisting, of a brand, in signaling the domestic origin of its products aimed at domestic consumers, that is, the “made in the domestic country” (MIDC) strategy. To this end, it is proposed to analyze the MIDC label as a cue interacting with the brand’s characteristics (brand equity and country of origin of the brand).

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment is conducted among 293 French consumers on four different brands of pasta. The overall design is a 2 (with/without the MIDC label) × 2 (high/low brand equity) × 2 (domestic/foreign brand) mixed design.

Findings

The results show that intention to buy the product increases significantly with the presence of the MIDC label, but not so willing to pay. The positive effect on buying intention is greater when: the product has rather low brand equity, consumer ethnocentrism is high and/or consumers are strongly attached to their national identity.

Research limitations/implications

The present research extends the literature on country-of-origin effects by taking into account the role of the brand equity of the product. However, the study focused on only one low-involvement product category (pasta) and one country (France).

Practical implications

This study shows that adding an MIDC label to the product is empirically justified.

Originality/value

While moderate or high scores on “patriotic” variables reinforce the positive impact of the MIDC label, low scores reverse the trend, that is, cause rejection.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Neil Thomas Bendle, Jonathan Knowles and Moeen Naseer Butt

Marketers frequently lament the lack of representation of marketing in the boardroom and the short tenure of CMOs. The most common explanations offered are that marketing…

Abstract

Marketers frequently lament the lack of representation of marketing in the boardroom and the short tenure of CMOs. The most common explanations offered are that marketing is not perceived as a strategic discipline and that marketers do not demonstrate a strong enough understanding of how the business makes money.

Financial accounting is how “score is kept” in terms of business performance. It is, therefore, in the self-interest of marketers to become familiar with financial reporting. Doing so will allow them to understand how marketing activities are recorded. In addition, academic researchers need to understand the meaning of the financial measures that they often use as the metrics of success when researching marketing strategy questions.

This is especially important since financial reporting generally does not recognize assets created by marketing investments. In order to substantiate a claim that “brands are assets”, marketers must be able to explain how the financial accounting rules misrepresent economic reality and why managers might use a different set of principles for management reporting.

We argue that the misrepresentation of market-based assets has two forms of negative impact for marketers: external and internal. The external problems are that financial statements are not especially informative about the value of marketing for the providers of capital and do not provide a true portrait of the economic resource base of the company. The internal problems are that marketers cannot point to valuable assets that they are creating, nor can they be effectively held accountable for the way that these assets are managed given that the assets are not recorded.

We do not expect immediate radical changes in financial reporting because financial accounting rules are designed with the specific interests of the suppliers of capital (debt and equity) in mind. To influence financial accounting developments, such as encouraging greater disclosure of marketing activity in the notes to the published accounts, marketers must be able to communicate in language understood by accountants and the current users of financial accounts. To aid this we provide guidance for marketers on the purpose and practices of accounting. We also discuss how academic marketing researchers might wish to adjust financial accounting data to capitalize a proportion of marketing expenses for companies where marketing is a primary driver of business performance.

Details

Marketing Accountability for Marketing and Non-marketing Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-563-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

THAT the intransigence of a minority, maybe, but a very forceful minority of workers in Britain is slowly but surely strangling the economy and with it, their own future…

Abstract

THAT the intransigence of a minority, maybe, but a very forceful minority of workers in Britain is slowly but surely strangling the economy and with it, their own future may be hard to believe; but incontrovertible evidence is there for all to see.

Details

Work Study, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1924

Dr. J. Johnstone Jervis, Medical Officer of Health for Leeds, referring to the Milk and Dairies (Amendment) Act, 1922, points out that whilst the new Act gives additional…

Abstract

Dr. J. Johnstone Jervis, Medical Officer of Health for Leeds, referring to the Milk and Dairies (Amendment) Act, 1922, points out that whilst the new Act gives additional powers to local authorities for the registration of retail purveyors and producers, and to remove the name of milk purveyors who fail to comply with the regulations, the same power is not given with regard to the producer—“he is still at liberty to produce milk where and how he pleases so long as his cows are free from tuberculosis and his cowsheds conform to the requirements of the Dairies, Cowsheds and Milkshops Order, or any regulations made under that Order. This distinction between the purveyor and the produced is most unfortunate inasmuch as it creates an anomaly, because, whereas the purveyor will be compelled to maintain his premises and utensils in a condition of cleanliness satisfactory to the local authority and the quality of the milk of a satisfactory standard, there will be no obligation on the part of the producer to take any pains to keep his milk clean. The result will be the reception into clean vessels of milk of a dirty and low‐grade quality more suitable for the swill tub than for a clean churn. It is neither fair nor equitable to make one standard for the farmer and another for the purveyor; both should have to work to the same standard.” Dr. Jervis also expresses disapproval of “grading.” Certified milk at 1s. 3d. a quart is only possible for the well‐to‐do classes and altogether outside the purchasing power of poor people. Nor is he “so convinced as some are that pasteurisation is a solution to the milk problem.” Cleanliness and purity are the essential factors, and if these are secured the public will be well served.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1970

Words like Participation tend to be labels stuck on generalities, signifying nothing. They are used as verbal bromides by publicists anxious to cover harsh realities with…

Abstract

Words like Participation tend to be labels stuck on generalities, signifying nothing. They are used as verbal bromides by publicists anxious to cover harsh realities with an attractive veneer. As a rule, once they have served their purpose, they are conveniently forgotten.

Details

Work Study, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Andreas Hoecht and Paul Trott

The production and sale of counterfeit products is big business in the international economy. Nowhere is this more evident than in China. This paper aims to review the…

2314

Abstract

Purpose

The production and sale of counterfeit products is big business in the international economy. Nowhere is this more evident than in China. This paper aims to review the anti-counterfeiting strategies that have been identified in the literature on counterfeiting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

This paper reviews 11 anti-counterfeiting strategies that have been suggested by relevant literature and has identified some of the success conditions. It also finds that firms should seek to take a longer-term view and to protect their technology-based competitive advantage. This is already happening: Japanese blue chip companies have begun to relocate sensitive R&D and high-tech manufacturing away from risky locations and back to Japan.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that the dominant legal enforcement (perspective) approach has been of limited success and explains the reasons for its failure.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that anti-counterfeiting strategies should be seen as complementary rather than as mutually exclusive and that in the long run, as countries get more technologically advanced, governments will develop a strong self-interest in tackling the counterfeit problem themselves.

Originality/value

The paper provides a systematic discussion of alternative anti-counterfeiting strategies that have been suggested by the literature and explores their success conditions in some detail.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Martin Neumann

The article examines strategies of human resource management in the absence of institutional hedging by norm-enforcing institutions such as a state monopoly of violence by…

382

Abstract

Purpose

The article examines strategies of human resource management in the absence of institutional hedging by norm-enforcing institutions such as a state monopoly of violence by using case studies of criminal organizations. This condition provides a test-bed for studying the effects of human relations management strategies on organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, a case study methodology is applied. Three cases are selected to build a scale from complete plasticity of an undifferentiated network via a status differentiated gang to a hierarchical organization that provides social positions. The case studies are analysed by qualitative content analysis, network analysis and agent-based simulation.

Findings

An undifferentiated network based on informal trust lacks mechanisms for conflict resolution. This is a highly vulnerable organizational structure. While a status differentiated gang is more resilient towards internal conflicts, its activities remain dependent on individually accumulated social capital. This organizational structure is not resilient over generations of actors. A hierarchical organization provides highest degree of structural resilience up to a level of a system of self-organized criticality.

Originality/value

The study of human relations management outside the legal world provides insights into the basic mechanisms and functional effects of organizational activity.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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