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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Maria Vincenza Ciasullo, Mariarosaria Carli, Weng Marc Lim and Rocco Palumbo

The article applies the citizen science phenomenon – i.e. lay people involvement in research endeavours aimed at pushing forward scientific knowledge – to healthcare…

Abstract

Purpose

The article applies the citizen science phenomenon – i.e. lay people involvement in research endeavours aimed at pushing forward scientific knowledge – to healthcare. Attention is paid to initiatives intended to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic as an illustrative case to exemplify the contribution of citizen science to system-wide innovation in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology consisting of three sequential steps was developed. Firstly, a realist literature review was carried out to contextualize citizen science to healthcare. Then, an account of successfully completed large-scale, online citizen science projects dealing with healthcare and medicine has been conducted in order to obtain preliminary information about distinguishing features of citizen science in healthcare. Thirdly, a broad search of citizen science initiatives targeted to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic has been performed. A comparative case study approach has been undertaken to examine the attributes of such projects and to unravel their peculiarities.

Findings

Citizen science enacts the development of a lively healthcare ecosystem, which takes its nourishment from the voluntary contribution of lay people. Citizen scientists play different roles in accomplishing citizen science initiatives, ranging from data collectors to data analysts. Alongside enabling big data management, citizen science contributes to lay people's education and empowerment, soliciting their active involvement in service co-production and value co-creation.

Practical implications

Citizen science is still underexplored in healthcare. Even though further evidence is needed to emphasize the value of lay people's involvement in scientific research applied to healthcare, citizen science is expected to revolutionize the way innovation is pursued and achieved in the healthcare ecosystem. Engaging lay people in a co-creating partnership with expert scientist can help us to address unprecedented health-related challenges and to shape the future of healthcare. Tailored health policy and management interventions are required to empower lay people and to stimulate their active engagement in value co-creation.

Originality/value

Citizen science relies on the wisdom of the crowd to address major issues faced by healthcare organizations. The article comes up with a state of the art investigation of citizen science in healthcare, shedding light on its attributes and envisioning avenues for further development.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2019

Ehi Eric Esoimeme

This paper aims to critically examine the lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force to determine if the policy is capable of curbing corruption in the Nigerian…

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132

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically examine the lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force to determine if the policy is capable of curbing corruption in the Nigerian Police Force.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis took the form of a desk study, which analyzed various documents and reports such as the report by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the National Bureau of Statistics titled “Corruption in Nigeria – Bribery: Public Experience and Response,” Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2017, the report by the International Police Science Association and the Institute for Economics and Peace.

Findings

This paper determined that the lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force could achieve its desired objectives if the following recommendations are implemented: The Nigeria Police Reform Trust Fund bill should be given accelerated consideration in the Senate and House of Representatives based on its urgency and significance for the new lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force. There is need for the Nigerian Police to have enough funds to conduct trainings for police personnel who are chosen as examiners for the lie detector tests. The Nigerian National Assembly will need to pass an Act to provide for the licensing of detection of deception examiners – commonly known as polygraph or lie detector operators – and regulation of that profession. The act should set forth the conditions under which persons may be admitted to practice detection of deception with a polygraph, the standards they must observe and the types of polygraph devices that they may henceforth be used lawfully. This is what was done in the State of Illinois. The Nigeria Police Force is advised to make use of two examiners for the lie detector test: one in-house examiner and one external examiner. The external examiner may be from another country in which corruption is not at a high rate, and must be someone of high integrity and professional competence. This measure may reduce the risk of bribery and corruption in the system. It will also bring more integrity and transparency into the system. The external examiner may also carry out “on the job training” with the in-house examiner while the polygraph exercise is going on. The Nigeria Police Force must make a new policy that mandates that all transactions relating to the purchase of polygraph machines must be conducted in an open and fair manner that recognizes the need for the transaction to be done directly with the seller, and not through a sales agent. This policy may help prevent a situation where a corrupt sales agent connives with a corrupt police officer to defraud the police unit. An ongoing approach to screening should be considered for specific positions, as circumstances change, or for a comprehensive review of departmental staff over a period. The Nigeria Police Force should have a policy that mandates that the lie detector test should be taken once in five years by all staff of the Nigeria Police Force. For staff in very sensitive positions, the lie detector test should be taken every three years. This will enable the lie detector policy to be more effective. Let us take, for example, a person passes the lie detector test genuinely without any influence of corruption; there is still a possibility that the person may change over time. The temptation to follow current employees to collect bribes is very high. But if the Nigeria Police Force put a policy in place that mandates every police personnel to take the lie detector test every five years starting from the first five years after recruitment, the cankerworm called corruption may be curbed effectively. Imagine if every police personnel knew that they were going to be asked by an examiner, five years after working, to confirm if they ever collected bribe during the time they served in the police force; most employees will desist from taking bribes or engaging in corrupt acts. The above measure will ensure that current employees who are chosen as examiners for the lie detector tests are fit and proper persons for the job.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the new lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force. It does not address the other anti-corruption policies of the Nigeria Police Force.

Originality/value

This paper offers a critical analysis of the lie detector test policy of the Nigeria Police Force. It will provide recommendations on how the policy could be strengthened. This is the only paper to adopt this kind of approach.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Nita Chhinzer

– The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of reasonable notice legislation on organizational mass lay-off practices in Canada.

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237

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the impact of reasonable notice legislation on organizational mass lay-off practices in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Information regarding 1,147 mass lay-off events in Ontario were examined using aggregate level data analysis and ANOVA to develop an understanding of the role of legislation on mass lay-off practices. The data represent all Notice of Mass Termination provided to the Ministry of Labour from 2001 to 2008.

Findings

The results suggest that organizations choose to absorb inefficiencies during mass lay-offs to reduce expenses associated with reasonable notice periods. Additionally, the findings suggest that the use of mass lay-offs is polarized, with some organizations executing frequent large lay-offs, whereas others execute infrequent smaller lay-offs.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides evidence that labour legislation influences organizational decision-making during time of significant organizational change, using an ad hoc review of past organizational event. Further research is required to establish the theoretic basis (motivation, rationalization and perceptions) for these empirical results.

Originality/value

As downsizing becomes a business norm, the role of government and the concept of reasonable notice remain largely unexplored. Challenges with data availability continue to pose a significant barrier to effectively integrating both internal and external factors that influence organization level downsizing decisions. This article is very timely and extends the current discourse, by providing a preliminary exploratory analysis on the role of reasonable notice legislation.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Kirk Chang, Sylvain Max and Jérémy Celse

Employee’s lying behavior has become ubiquitous at work, and managers are keen to know what can be done to curb such behavior. Managers often apply anti-lying strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee’s lying behavior has become ubiquitous at work, and managers are keen to know what can be done to curb such behavior. Managers often apply anti-lying strategies in their management and, in particular, the role of self-awareness on lying intervention has drawn academic attention recently. Drawing on multi-disciplinary literature, this study aims to investigate the efficacy of self-awareness in reducing lying behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the perspectives of positivism and deductive reasoning, a quasi-experimental research approach was adopted. Employees from Dijon, France were recruited as research participants. Based on the literature, different conditions (scenario manipulation) were designed and implemented in the laboratory, in which participants were exposed to pre-set lying opportunities and their responses were analyzed accordingly.

Findings

Unlike prior studies which praised the merits of self-awareness, the authors found that self-awareness did not decrease lying behavior, not encouraging the confession of lying either. Employees actually lied more when they believed other employees were lying.

Practical implications

This study suggests managers not to rely on employee’s self-awareness; rather, the concept of self-awareness should be incorporated into the work ethics, and managers should schedule regular workshops to keep employees informed of the importance of ethics. When employees are regularly reminded of the ethics and appreciate its importance, their intention of lying is more likely to decrease.

Originality/value

To the best of the atuhors’ knowledge, the current research is the first in its kind to investigate lying intervention of employees in the laboratory setting. Research findings have brought new insights into the lying intervention literature, which has important implication on the implementation of anti-lying strategies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2020

Mehdi Jamshidi, Farshid Saeedi and Hamid Darabi

The purpose of this paper is to determine the structure of nilpotent (n+6)-dimensional n-Lie algebras of class 2 when n4.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the structure of nilpotent (n+6)-dimensional n-Lie algebras of class 2 when n4.

Design/methodology/approach

By dividing a nilpotent (n+6)-dimensional n-Lie algebra of class 2 by a central element, the authors arrive to a nilpotent (n+5) dimensional n-Lie algebra of class 2. Given that the authors have the structure of nilpotent (n+5)-dimensional n-Lie algebras of class 2, the authors have access to the structure of the desired algebras.

Findings

In this paper, for each n4, the authors have found 24 nilpotent (n+6) dimensional n-Lie algebras of class 2. Of these, 15 are non-split algebras and the nine remaining algebras are written as direct additions of n-Lie algebras of low-dimension and abelian n-Lie algebras.

Originality/value

This classification of n-Lie algebras provides a complete understanding of these algebras that are used in algebraic studies.

Details

Arab Journal of Mathematical Sciences, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1319-5166

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Mariati Norhashim and Kamarulzaman Ab. Aziz

Proposes that, arms length economic system (ALS) is not always appropriate for developing nations. The alternative of a relationship based system (RBS) which is often…

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1536

Abstract

Proposes that, arms length economic system (ALS) is not always appropriate for developing nations. The alternative of a relationship based system (RBS) which is often mistaken for crony capitalism as practiced in Malaysia is offered. Entrepreneurial spirit so fundamental to the development of an economy may be so lacking as to perish under an ALS yet be able to flourish under RBS. Explains three major aspects of how the Malaysian Economy was able to flourish under the RBS (1) the cultural reform of the majority indigenous group (2) the multi‐cultural cooperation between the economically superior Chinese and the less economically developed Malays and (3) The spill‐over effect from privatisation policies. Recognising the existence and legitimacy of an RBS as an economic model may offer a new approach towards poverty eradication and economic development of Third World countries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Daniel R. Horne, Patricia A. Norberg and A. Cemal Ekin

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of two studies that explored consumer misrepresentation (lying) during personal information disclosure in a commercial…

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1578

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of two studies that explored consumer misrepresentation (lying) during personal information disclosure in a commercial context. Disclosure strategies and mediating processes that might influence lying were also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were carried out to examine the phenomenon of interest. The first study examined the extent of consumer lying in a consumer‐commercial exchange context, the variation of lying about different kinds of personal information and a classification of consumers in terms of disclosure tendencies. The second study examined two mediating processes that may drive lying behavior: cost‐benefit evaluations and fairness evaluations.

Findings

The findings suggest that individuals tend to falsify some items more than they do others, and, even in information categories that are not “personally identifying,” there is a high level of misrepresentation. It was also found that consumers can be grouped based on their disclosure strategy (lying, omitting, truthfully disclosing), and the strategy appears to be related to perceived experience with disclosure. Finally, it was found that the cost‐benefit of disclosure influences consumer lying, but fairness perceptions do not appear to influence lying behavior.

Practical implications

Based on the findings in this study, a percentage of information appears to be faulty. This brings into question data quality, in that good marketing decisions presumes good data. Information‐based marketing exchanges appear to be driven by cost‐benefit evaluations. If this is the case, then marketers should strive to ethically develop elicitation strategies that either reduce the perceived cost of consumer disclosure or increase consumers' perceptions of the value they receive in exchange for personal information.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information on consumer lying with regard to disclosing personal information in a commercial context.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Mary Canning and Brendan O'Dwyer

This paper aims to advance understanding of the disciplinary decision‐making process underpinning the professional ethics machinery employed by professional accounting…

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1746

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance understanding of the disciplinary decision‐making process underpinning the professional ethics machinery employed by professional accounting organisations, using elements of francophone organisational analysis to examine the influence of the key formal organisational components established by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland (ICAI) to administer its disciplinary decision‐making process up to December 1999.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses evidence gathered from a series of in‐depth interviews with members of the ICAI disciplinary and investigation committees.

Findings

Illuminates the internal tensions and conflicts permeating the disciplinary decision‐making process of the ICAI and the influence key organisational components have on resolving these conflicts through their encouragement of decision making driven by a preferred reasoning or logic of action.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence presented questions the public interest proclamations of the ICAI with respect to its disciplinary procedures pre‐December 1999. It further exposes the tensions between profession protection and society protection motives in the disciplinary decision making of accounting bodies.

Originality/value

This paper represents a first attempt at getting inside the disciplinary decision‐making process of a professional accounting body to examine the process using the voices of process participants.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Bernard M. Meltzer

Seeking to clarify the concept of lying, I deal with several topics on which ideas vary. I consider the symbolic, intentional, misleading, and relational character of lies

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2092

Abstract

Seeking to clarify the concept of lying, I deal with several topics on which ideas vary. I consider the symbolic, intentional, misleading, and relational character of lies, and include secrecy and other forms of deliberate deception within lies on the basis of these components. Next, I distinguish between human and nonhuman deception, invoking the concepts of symbols, role‐taking, self, and mind. Following this, I present several representative categories of the infinite array of benign and exploitive social contexts in which lying occurs. In a brief discussion, I then impugn the commonly‐used notion of “self‐deception” as internally contradictory. And, finally, I describe both negative and positive consequences of deception in human affairs.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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