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Case study
Publication date: 11 December 2023

Leena B. Dam

Upon completion of the case study, students are expected to identify the characteristics that differentiate a family business from other businesses, understand the life cycles of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of the case study, students are expected to identify the characteristics that differentiate a family business from other businesses, understand the life cycles of family businesses and evaluate the significance of succession planning and leadership development in a family business.

Case overview/synopsis

In May 2023, when the sultry afternoon had settled down, Bijan Dam, a first-generation entrepreneur and a septuagenarian, was in a pensive mood. Introspecting life events, he ruminated that if he could rewind the tape of life, go back in space and time, would things be different. “I wish life gave me a second chance,” he lamented! Perhaps he could have planned better. Since founding the printing business in 1985, Ruby Art Press had scaled up significantly from letter press to full-fledged computer printing technology unit. The press had made inroads in job orders, government contracts and screen printing. Its client base was large. It also attracted repeat clients from adjoining states. With a successful business history of three and half decades, he had assumed the business would thrive perpetually. Today the business he had built, sustained and raised was practically gone. Why had he not anticipated the future potential of the business? Why had he not dwelled upon the successful business progression? Regardless of impeccable client service and personalized vendor management, what were the missing cues in the business? Deep agony and heavy burden of remorse were mentally excruciating. This had pestering effect on his health condition. Given these challenges, how could Dam ensure business continuity?

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in entrepreneurship, family business management and human management courses. The dilemma can be explained as part of the courses for undergraduate and postgraduate programs.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Case study
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Sadhna Dash, Leena B. Dam, Deepa Pillai and Jitender Kumar

At the end of the case discussion, students would be able to: design key account selection criteria for the organization’s vast clients; analyse the application of key account…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, students would be able to: design key account selection criteria for the organization’s vast clients; analyse the application of key account management (KAM) strategies in a business-to-business (B2B) segment for revenue growth for a medium-scale enterprise; recognize the significance of KAM in a B2B space for a scale enterprise; and assess the proficiency of Univ Manufacturers (UM) for KAM in addressing the existing challenges and managing business growth.

Case overview/synopsis

Tarun, the proprietor of UM, has recently received two big orders, one from Ram Enterprise, a long-standing client since 2011 of INR 2m (10% profit margin) and another order from a new client based in Chennai, a growing pharmaceutical products company, of order size of INR 2.3m (15% profit margin). Both the orders were required to be completed within 15 days. The new client with higher value and better returns could help UM enter the south India market, whereas business from the existing client was also profitable. Despite both orders being necessary for business survival and expansion, fulfilling them on schedule posed a huge challenge. Tarun wanted to fulfil both orders. He knew similar situations might arise in future. He advocated prioritizing customers, which made him contemplate KAM. On what basis he should categorize his customers was a big question. Tarun felt that it was time for UM to strategize relationship management with his customers. He wanted to optimize the partnerships. Tarun knew he wanted to introduce KAM, but was firm-level internal capabilities were enough for key account execution. What would be the feasible outcomes if KAM is applied at UM? What must he do to prevent such situations in the future?

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in B2B marketing and sales management courses. The dilemma can be explained as part of a marketing course for postgraduate and executive programs.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 26 July 2023

Medha Kulkarni, Leena B. Dam and Bharat Pawar

After working through the case, the students should be able to understand Indian political economy and the brand building process of NaMo; identify the media mix strategies used…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After working through the case, the students should be able to understand Indian political economy and the brand building process of NaMo; identify the media mix strategies used to build the brand NaMo in India; evaluate possible future growth strategies for brand NaMo; and compare and contrast brand NaMo with business brands.

Case overview/synopsis

Narendra Modi popularly called as NaMo was the current Prime Minister of India. He belonged to Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) which won India’s general elections in two consecutive terms 2014 and 2019. NaMo was recognised worldwide for his prudence in leading the country to greater heights of achievement. NaMo started his political journey as the worker of BJP at a tender age. His rise in political career was akin to flagship brand overtaking the parent brand. All the steps taken in the past to position himself as a cult brand, will it fortify to NaMo’s victory in 2024 general elections? Business firms may follow NaMo’s strategies. What can the business brands emulate from NaMo to market and position themselves? Can political success be transpired to business success?

Complexity academic level

This case is designed for use in a graduate-/postgraduate-level marketing course in segments on brand management, brand expansion and the marketing strategies of a market leader. The case can also be used in a brand management course to discuss brand management models (e.g. Keller’s brand resonance pyramid and brand value chain). This case has particular application for classes that focus on brand equity, STP for any brand (segmentation, targeting and positioning) and brand value chain. The case looks in detail at the Indian political market and brand building process of NaMo and examines competitive moves since its inception. This case can be used in brand management, media management courses. The dilemma can be explained as part of a marketing course for postgraduate and executive programmes.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 29 January 2019

Deepa Pillai and Leena B. Dam

The learning outcomes are as follows: decision-making in the areas of business plan, business strategy, financial management, profit planning and marketing, learning from outer…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: decision-making in the areas of business plan, business strategy, financial management, profit planning and marketing, learning from outer business environment, succession planning for first-generation entrepreneur and choosing appropriate source of financing and drivers for diversification.

Case overview/synopsis

Immersed in sipping green tea in his capacious office lounge, the octogenarian Arjun Mehta introspected on the trials and tribulations of his journey as an entrepreneur, the voyage which started four decades ago. From 1976 to 2018, the business has now traversed three generations. Starting with Spice Mart (Sole Proprietor) to Hindware and Lament Construction (partnership firms) to Starlite Homes Pvt. Ltd. (corporate entity), Mr Mehta witnessed transformation and restructuring in organization with every new generation which characterized the evolution of family business. Handholding children to take up the reins of Spice Mart was not a calculated choice. Yet it is remarkable to study the growth in organizational structure of the regional family business. As a self-made entrepreneur, morals, ethics and value system are vital ingredients steering the organic growth story. Third-generation Mehta’s are enterprising, aspiring and visionary. With the incorporation of a corporate entity, they convinced themselves to bring inorganic growth in their business. Arjun Mehta gleamed with pride as Spice Mart partakes an organized structure which had lost prominence with the second-generation entrepreneurs. But he is equally hammered with juxtaposed thoughts. He contemplates whether the integration of retail business with real estate corroborates sustainable innovation. Will independent businesses create the brand’s footprints perpetually? Should the millennial confine business natively or should they grow internationally and become a conglomerate?

Complexity academic level

The case can be exclusively taught to masters and executive education class of students pursuing entrepreneurship and business management courses. The case will supplement understanding of theories of entrepreneurship and dimensions of family businesses in emerging economies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Leena B. Dam and Deepa Pillai

The instructor should discuss the various forms of organization. Particular reference needs to be drawn on “For Benefit” firms. How such firms enable societal development should…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The instructor should discuss the various forms of organization. Particular reference needs to be drawn on “For Benefit” firms. How such firms enable societal development should be stressed upon. Other theories considered are “need achievement theory”, “self-determination theory” and “social cognitive theory.”

Research methodology

The primary data for the case was from a series of in-depth interviews and interactions with Sonia and her core team members of Bazaar and Approval Teams. Frequent deliberation with the founder and core team led to interesting dialogues on the aspiration to uphold Pune Ladies Association (PULA) Exclusives Pvt. Ltd. as a “For Benefit firm” and developing indigenous women entrepreneurs which was a stimuli for writing the case. Online surveys of the PULA verified sellers were conducted to identify their rationale of starting the venture and also their experiences on the PULA platform.

Case overview/synopsis

March 2019, the core committee of PULA Exclusives Pvt. Ltd. (the firm) engineered a dialogue. They wanted to expand a new horizon with its mission of “For Benefit”. The firm is an offshoot of PULA, a virtual women’s community in Facebook.

Complexity academic level

The case may be used for postgraduate students pursuing entrepreneurship and management courses. The case can be used for teaching executive level programs of business strategy and digital media. The case applies to the use of digital media in businesses, social entrepreneurship and innovation strategies.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2023

Raju Varghese Vazhapilly and Leena B. Dam

The protagonist of the case is Mr. Prasad Dhumal. Prasad is technically gifted and is considered a subject expert in his line. Prasad exhibits all entrepreneurial traits like high…

Abstract

Purpose

The protagonist of the case is Mr. Prasad Dhumal. Prasad is technically gifted and is considered a subject expert in his line. Prasad exhibits all entrepreneurial traits like high energy, positive and a never say die attitude, technical expertise, etc. In a short career span, Prasad has already been instrumental in opening at least 7 different ventures and is now planning the 8th one and hence the name of the case. None of the ventures have survived. This is a classic case of differences between entrepreneurial qualities and managerial qualities, required for the success of a small business.

Design/methodology/approach

The case is ideal for students of management. The focus areas are Career Management and Entrepreneurship. It also discusses the failure of a business unit from a societal and family perspective rather than simply a financial one. The case is also good to impress upon the audience the distinction between entrepreneurial skills and managerial skills. The focus that the protagonist shows in starting multiple ventures is also a good indicator of objective-driven and clear Career Management, but the lack of the identified skill set to run a business.

Findings

The case brings about the clear distinctions between entrepreneurial qualities and managerial qualities. Career Management has three objectives, expression of the self as a person through the activities one does (job/entrepreneurship) and personal fulfilment, to have an effective work-life balance so that the workplace does not become simply a chore and finally financial security which is also expressed as a reward for something one does or contributes. Even a well-defined career management plan may at times, not yield the desired results.

Research limitations/implications

This is an attempt at a case-based approach highlighting how entrepreneurial zeal and drive may not result in a success of a business venture. Further, the case highlights the serious financial and social isolation that the protagonists faced due to his business failures. The basic learnings from the case are as follows: (1) Start-ups go through phase after establishment; (2) The skill set used to start a venture and sustain it are different and (3) The venture has to survive in a business environment on its merits.

Practical implications

It is a good source material for students of entrepreneurship to understand that sound entrepreneurial qualities may not ensure business success. Businesses may require a blend of managerial, strategic and entrepreneurial qualities to help them navigate through the business environment.

Social implications

Although a lot has been written about entrepreneurship, the social implications of a business failure and the impact on the entrepreneurs, his family and his loved ones forms the crux of the case. Financial losses result in social isolation for the protagonist. The humiliation and isolation associated with a business loss and its serious impact on friends and family also is highlighted in the case.

Originality/value

The case is factual and describes the exact entrepreneurial journey of Prasad.

Details

IIM Ranchi journal of management studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-0138

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Leena Paakkari and Olli Paakkari

The aim of this paper is to define health literacy as a learning outcome in schools, and to describe the learning conditions that are relevant for targeting health literacy.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to define health literacy as a learning outcome in schools, and to describe the learning conditions that are relevant for targeting health literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on theoretical and empirical educational literature, and also the experiences of the authors.

Findings

Health literacy is defined as consisting of five core components: theoretical knowledge, practical knowledge, critical thinking, self‐awareness, and citizenship. The first three components are rather similar to the commonly‐accepted health literacy concept, but the definition given in this paper expands the concept via two additional – but essential – components. It is emphasized that when one is aiming to develop students' internal capacity to construct their own meanings regarding health topics, these two additional components are called for. The paper argues that one of the main aims of health teaching in schools should be to foster students' ability to define their own beliefs, identity and social relations. Moreover, if it is desired that students should become responsible citizens, acting in an ethically responsible way, competencies such as ethical reflection skills should be developed in schools. The paper also highlights the fact that the development of certain health literacy components calls for particular kinds of learning conditions.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the core components of health literacy as a learning outcome and gives practical examples of means to achieve a particular target.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Liudmila Tarabashkina, Olga Tarabashkina, Pascale Quester and Geoffrey N. Soutar

While past studies have shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) influences brand equity, loyalty and brand attitudes, research about CSR effects on the responsible and…

Abstract

Purpose

While past studies have shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) influences brand equity, loyalty and brand attitudes, research about CSR effects on the responsible and active dimensions of brand personality remains limited. This study aims to address this gap and examine how brands with different personality strength benefit from CSR communication, providing novel insights about CSR’s branding payoffs to firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted. Study 1 tested if CSR communication influenced responsible and active brand personality dimensions compared to non-CSR communication. Study 2 examined how varying CSR spending allocations affect personality perceptions of weak and strong brands. Studies 1 and 2 measured responsible and active brand personalities before and after exposure to experimental manipulations, assessing immediate changes in brand personality. Study 3 replicated the results of Study 2 using fictitious brands whose initial brand personalities were manipulated as either weak or strong.

Findings

CSR communication has the potential to influence brands’ responsible and active personalities compared to non-CSR communication. However, changes in brand personalities were contingent on CSR manipulations (smaller vs larger CSR spending) and initial brand strength. Brands that lacked strongly responsible and strong active personalities experienced an improvement in these perceptions after exposure to any CSR spending message. However, brands with strong responsible or strong active personalities experienced brand erosion after exposure to smaller CSR spending message or no improvement when the CSR message was aligned with the responsible and active conduct (e.g. mentioned larger CSR spending).

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine how CSR affects brand personality. By combining signalling and attitude change/congruity principle theories, it provides novel theoretical contributions to explain when CSR can improve, erode or exert no effect on the responsible and active brand personalities, providing insights for effective brand management.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Shreyashi Chakraborty and Leena Chatterjee

The Indian context is marked with weak anti-discrimination laws and patchy implementation of protection of civil rights of women at workplaces. The purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The Indian context is marked with weak anti-discrimination laws and patchy implementation of protection of civil rights of women at workplaces. The purpose of this paper is to unearth the rationales of the adoption of gender diversity management policies and practices in India, in the absence of laws and regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspiration is drawn from previous studies on diversity management in other national contexts, and a survey methodology was adopted. The lead researcher administered the questionnaires personally to all respondents to ensure that the understanding of the questions is uniform across respondents as gender diversity management is a relatively new concept in India.

Findings

Size of the organisation (number of full-time employees), the influence of external organisations and perceived enhanced organisational flexibility were found to explain the adoption of gender diversity management policies and practices in the Indian IT/ITeS industry. Findings also indicate that Indian subsidiaries of foreign multinationals tend to adopt more gender diversity management policies and practices as compared to Indian-owned organisations.

Research implications

This study provides evidence that organisations do not always enact structures or behaviours in the pursuit of normative rationality and also consider the economic value of them, establishing an organisational agency in adopting legitimated norms or practices. The study also shows that gender diversity management policies and practices are not only dependent on the enactment of laws but also are adopted because of the economic benefit perceived.

Originality/value

Diversity management policies and practices have been mostly studied in national contexts with anti-discrimination laws or affirmative action programs and have been claimed to be a successor of equal employment opportunity (EEO) policies. In the absence of stringent laws to reduce or eliminate discrimination against women employees in Indian workplaces, this study contributes to the literature by determining whether the business case for gender diversity drives the adoption of gender diversity management in the Indian context.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Kalyan Nagaraj, Biplab Bhattacharjee, Amulyashree Sridhar and Sharvani GS

Phishing is one of the major threats affecting businesses worldwide in current times. Organizations and customers face the hazards arising out of phishing attacks because of…

Abstract

Purpose

Phishing is one of the major threats affecting businesses worldwide in current times. Organizations and customers face the hazards arising out of phishing attacks because of anonymous access to vulnerable details. Such attacks often result in substantial financial losses. Thus, there is a need for effective intrusion detection techniques to identify and possibly nullify the effects of phishing. Classifying phishing and non-phishing web content is a critical task in information security protocols, and full-proof mechanisms have yet to be implemented in practice. The purpose of the current study is to present an ensemble machine learning model for classifying phishing websites.

Design/methodology/approach

A publicly available data set comprising 10,068 instances of phishing and legitimate websites was used to build the classifier model. Feature extraction was performed by deploying a group of methods, and relevant features extracted were used for building the model. A twofold ensemble learner was developed by integrating results from random forest (RF) classifier, fed into a feedforward neural network (NN). Performance of the ensemble classifier was validated using k-fold cross-validation. The twofold ensemble learner was implemented as a user-friendly, interactive decision support system for classifying websites as phishing or legitimate ones.

Findings

Experimental simulations were performed to access and compare the performance of the ensemble classifiers. The statistical tests estimated that RF_NN model gave superior performance with an accuracy of 93.41 per cent and minimal mean squared error of 0.000026.

Research limitations/implications

The research data set used in this study is publically available and easy to analyze. Comparative analysis with other real-time data sets of recent origin must be performed to ensure generalization of the model against various security breaches. Different variants of phishing threats must be detected rather than focusing particularly toward phishing website detection.

Originality/value

The twofold ensemble model is not applied for classification of phishing websites in any previous studies as per the knowledge of authors.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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