Search results

1 – 10 of 33
Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Neil Quinn and Lee Knifton

285

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Julian Ashton, Lee Knifton and Neil Quinn

232

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2021

Julian Ashton, Lee Knifton and Neil Quinn

353

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Lee Knifton

672

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Woody Caan

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Lee Knifton, Alice Walker and Neil Quinn

Stigma and discrimination towards people with mental health problems is a global issue, imposing a considerable public health burden in terms of social isolation, limited life…

Abstract

Stigma and discrimination towards people with mental health problems is a global issue, imposing a considerable public health burden in terms of social isolation, limited life chances, delayed help‐seeking behaviour and stress. While numerous initiatives have been undertaken to address these issues, an evidence base for what works is still emerging. This paper explores the impact of 15 population‐level awareness workshops delivered over a five‐month period to 137 participants. These were employees drawn from workplaces identified as being important in the day‐to‐day lives of people with mental health problems. Evaluation approaches maximised specificity, sensitivity and anonymity and they assessed participant knowledge, attitude and behaviour. The workshops significantly improved participant knowledge. Attitude change was more complex with an overall significant improvement in attitudes, particularly in relation to unpredictability and recovery, but not dangerousness, which had more positive baseline attitudes. Social distance, a proxy for behavioural intent, had significant improvements in relation to ‘moderate’ social contact only. Qualitative feedback indicated that complex, unanticipated and positive messages had been absorbed by participants and influenced beliefs and behavioural intent. Service user narratives focusing on recovery were identified as the most valuable component of the intervention.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2009

Pamela Clarke and Lee Knifton

Now in its third year, The Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival is fast becoming a significant cultural annual event, which aims to achieve social change through the…

Abstract

Now in its third year, The Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival is fast becoming a significant cultural annual event, which aims to achieve social change through the arts. Through innovative programming of arts events, the Festival explores the relationship between mental health and creativity, celebrates the artistic achievements of people with experience of mental health issues, and promotes positive mental health and well‐being. It aims to promote the rights and recovery of people who experience mental ill health, while exploring mental health and inequalities that affect us all. The multi‐arts Festival focuses on audiences' existing interests in film, theatre, comedy, music, literature and visual arts to tackle stigma and engage people.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Belinda Arthur, Lee Knifton, Margaret Park and Ellen Doherty

People who have used mental health services in Scotland have the lowest employment rates of all working ages, despite a national programme for mental health and well‐being that…

Abstract

People who have used mental health services in Scotland have the lowest employment rates of all working ages, despite a national programme for mental health and well‐being that provides significant investment in anti‐stigma initiatives and employment support services. This paper qualitatively identifies barriers to employment from the perspectives of people who have experienced mental health issues by conducting in‐depth focus groups with 20 people who have experienced mental health issues undertaken through collaborative research involving people who have experienced mental health issues alongside practitioners and academics. Researchers who have experienced mental health issues instigated and determined the direction, execution and dissemination of the study. The findings add to the growing evidence base outlining the complex and interlinked barriers to employment which include previous experience of workplace discrimination, financial uncertainty, disclosure concerns, quality of jobs available and the potential of work at times to worsen mental health conditions. Despite this, most participants expressed hopefulness and resilience. Many wanted paid work and outlined practical steps that employers can take in terms of recruitment and retention. However, participants also stressed the equal importance of voluntary work and not just as a step to paid employment. A multiple‐perspectives approach provides important insights into the complex and sensitive policy area of mental health and employment. Meaningful involvement of people who have used mental health services should be a central aspect of further research that aims to understand and address these barriers. This study has shaped the development of a national service user research consortium in Scotland.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Uy Hoang, Sarah E.M. Crouch, Lee Knifton and Carol Brayne

299

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

1 – 10 of 33