Search results

1 – 10 of over 56000
Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Zsuzsa Kaló

Sex and gender are regarded as critical structural determinants of mental health and mental illness. Mental illness is a complex phenomenon, and risky behaviour and…

Abstract

Sex and gender are regarded as critical structural determinants of mental health and mental illness. Mental illness is a complex phenomenon, and risky behaviour and substance use commonly occur simultaneously or subsequent to one another. A gendered vulnerability in biological, environmental, and behavioural risk factors has been registered in the development and escalation of mental illness. Studies have found that women who use drugs experience greater physical and mental health repercussions than men. Women who use drugs present higher rates of depression and anxiety, suicidal tendencies, isolation and general psychological distress. This chapter addresses the most common mental illnesses associated with women who use drugs: depression, anxiety, trauma-related disorders, and eating disorders.

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Sara A. McComb

The three preceding articles highlight the ongoing research designed to better understand shared mental models and their role in team functioning. In some respects…

Abstract

The three preceding articles highlight the ongoing research designed to better understand shared mental models and their role in team functioning. In some respects, research scholars have achieved an integrated view (a.k.a. shared mental models) about the field (e.g., the growing body of empirical research results underscores the important role of the shared mental model construct in effective team functioning). In other respects, our mental models have not converged. Thus, we still need additional conceptual and empirical research to advance the field (e.g., many dimensions of mental models have been identified, but no agreement exists about their validity or the completeness of the list). In this response, I use the similar, divergent, and complementary views presented in the trio of articles by myself, Cannon-Bowers (this volume), and Rentsch and Small (this volume) to demonstrate how the process of scholarship is analogous to the mental model convergence process.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2015

Yujia Liu, David Rehkopf, Jingwen Zhong and Eunice Rodriguez

Financial stress has been found to contribute to mental health deterioration associated with job loss. This study examined whether specific types of income support…

Abstract

Financial stress has been found to contribute to mental health deterioration associated with job loss. This study examined whether specific types of income support programs (e.g., unemployment benefits and welfare) reduce the negative impacts of job loss on middle-aged women’s mental health in the United States. Two samples of women previously employed before their mental health assessments in their 40s and 50s were selected from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). We conducted regression analysis to predict their mental health scores using employment and income support program status. The model also controlled for baseline health before job loss, socioeconomic status, and demographic and family life characteristics. Compared to their continuously employed counterparts, 50 +  women who had job loss without unemployment benefits had significantly worse mental health. However, those receiving unemployment benefits did not have significantly worse mental health. Unemployment benefits’ ameliorating effect was not found in the 40 +  sample; and welfare programs did not have similar mental health effects. Our findings suggest that certain types of income support policies are beneficial to the mental health of certain cohorts of middle-aged women. For different groups of women, additional and alternative measures are needed to reduce the mental health damage of job loss.

Details

Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-567-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Julia Anwar-McHenry, Catherine F. Drane, Phoebe Joyce and Robert J. Donovan

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily…

Abstract

Purpose

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily targeting student mental health, but it is also intended for staff. This paper presents the results of an impact survey on staff after the implementation of the Framework in a number of schools in Western Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A baseline questionnaire was completed by n = 87 staff at schools that had just signed up to the programme, and a participant questionnaire was completed by n = 146 staff at schools that had been participating for at least 17 months.

Findings

The results show that the Framework has had a substantial impact on many staff in terms of increased mental health literacy and taking action to improve their mental health.

Originality/value

Mental health interventions in schools generally focus on students' well-being and how to deal with student mental health problems. There are few comprehensive interventions that also include staff well-being.

Details

Health Education, vol. 120 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Yi-Chung Cheng, Hui-Chi Chuang and Chih-Chuan Chen

Among the research studies related to the relevance between religious belief and mental health, most of them highlight people with religious belief who tend to obtain…

Abstract

Purpose

Among the research studies related to the relevance between religious belief and mental health, most of them highlight people with religious belief who tend to obtain mental comforting more easily. However, the research studies mentioned above were cross-sectional studies, and they only verified that religious beliefs and mental health are relevant, but they did not prove their cause-and-effect relationship. That is, they do not identify “due to people's religious beliefs, they have healthier mind” or “due to people's healthier minds, they have religious beliefs.” Therefore, the study aims to explore the benefit evaluation of religious belief affecting mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses propensity score matching (PSM) and treatment effect (ATT) to carry out the causal inference between religious beliefs and mental health. First, the propensity score (PS) is calculated from the impact factors that affect people's religious belief before establishing counterfactual analysis based on the PS to analyze the effect of religious beliefs to further understand the difference of mental health index between people with religious belief and without it, and confirm the cause-and-effect relationship between them.

Findings

Religious beliefs and participation are ubiquitous within and across populations. The associates between religious participation and health are considerably in great magnitude. Most of the research in the past related to religious beliefs and mental health only verified that religious beliefs and mental health are relevant but not proved its cause-and-effect relationship. This paper aimed to explore the causal relationship between religious belief and mental health. The experimental results showed religious belief has treatment effect toward “daily functioning,” “feeling affect,” “spirituality” and “mental health.” On a whole, religious belief can promote mental health.

Originality/value

In academic and practical circles, there are a lot of research studies exploring the relationship between religious belief and mental health. However, there is no research investigating the cause-and-effect relationship between religious belief and mental health. It also causes some questioning toward the relevant research studies. Therefore, the outcome of this study not only can clarify the legitimacy, importance, and practicality on the researches in the past but also provide the practical support for psychology and counseling.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Antonela Tommasel, Andrés Diaz-Pace, Juan Manuel Rodriguez and Daniela Godoy

The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for forecasting mental health conditions and emotions of a given population during the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for forecasting mental health conditions and emotions of a given population during the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina based on social media contents.

Design/methodology/approach

Mental health conditions and emotions are captured via markers, which link social media contents with lexicons. First, the authors build time series models that describe the evolution of markers and their correlation with crisis events. Second, the authors use the time series for forecasting markers and identifying high prevalence points for the estimated markers.

Findings

The authors evaluated different forecasting strategies that yielded different performance and capabilities. In the best scenario, high prevalence periods of emotions and mental health issues can be satisfactorily predicted with a neural network strategy, even at early stages of a crisis (e.g. a training period of seven days).

Practical implications

This work contributes to a better understanding of how psychological processes related to crises manifest in social media, and this is a valuable asset for the design, implementation and monitoring of health prevention and communication policies.

Originality/value

Although there have been previous efforts to predict mental states of individuals, the analysis of mental health at the collective level has received scarce attention. The authors take a step forward by proposing a forecasting approach for analyzing the mental health of a given population at a larger scale.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Mbita Mbao and Johnnie Hamilton-Mason

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of African community leaders, on factors that influence substance use and mental health status of Sub-Sahara…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of African community leaders, on factors that influence substance use and mental health status of Sub-Sahara African immigrants living in the northeast region of the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A social constructionist approach to grounded theory was used to understand social life’s complexity in the African community. Data analysis consisted of initial coding and focused coding, which led to the emerging of the following mid-range theories.

Findings

The following mid-range theories are developed: the work culture of Sub-Sahara African immigrants may influence substance-use behaviors, impact treatment for mental health and contribute to interpersonal conflicts related to marriage and parenting; there may be a relationship between the culture of privacy and spirituality because the church is often a place of comfort, and many may not seek treatment for mental health for fear of losing that community; Sub-Sahara African immigrants’ mental health and substance-use behaviors are influenced by unique factors that stem from balancing living in the new culture while also preserving their unique cultural norms.

Originality/value

The analysis of perceptions of African community leaders underscored “On the go” as a metaphor for describing Sub-Sahara African immigrants.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Nicholas Weaver

Theoretical generalisation provides the basis for tackling problems of service complexity, fragmentation and disrupted care pathways.

Abstract

Purpose

Theoretical generalisation provides the basis for tackling problems of service complexity, fragmentation and disrupted care pathways.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent mental health service transformation in Wales, United Kingdom, has been stimulated by a policy programme underpinned by person-centred recovery values. This paper offers analysis informed by the perspectives of Niklas Luhmann and other noted theorists to examine escalating service system complexity related to this transformation. Analysis builds upon the findings of a qualitative study employing thematic discourse analysis of talk of people with mental illness and associated workers.

Findings

In total, three themes were constructed in participants' talk: “Competing versions of recovery”, “Misaligned service expectations” and “Disrupted care pathways.” Recovery may be understood as a form of moral communication and autopoietic meaning-making activity, according to Luhmann's radical constructionist epistemology. This has the potential to generate competing versions of recovery, a key contributor to escalating complexity.

Research limitations/implications

Findings could be developed further by continued investigation of the relationship between recovery implementation and service fragmentation.

Social implications

A more judicious, balanced policy-implementation may cultivate optimal conditions for recovery pluralism by avoiding polarisation towards either top-down, policy-based recovery implementation or a proliferation of approaches at the grassroots level. Findings have implications for healthcare settings beyond the scope of mental healthcare, given the prevalence of person-centred care internationally.

Originality/value

A simplistic view of recovery implementation should be challenged. Recovery should not be considered a “magic bullet” for mental healthcare delivery. Haphazard recovery-implementation may have detrimental effects of escalating complexity, service fragmentation and disrupted care pathways.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Sungyong Chun and Devon S. Johnson

Consumers who experience social exclusion often prefer high-risk financial products over low-risk financial products. The aim of this study is to examine how this effect…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers who experience social exclusion often prefer high-risk financial products over low-risk financial products. The aim of this study is to examine how this effect can be attenuated by applying the theories of mental budgeting and pain of payment. The authors’ aim in pursuing this research is to improve the effectiveness of financial professionals and others in educating consumers on healthy financial practices. Understanding how social exclusion experiences influence financial decision-making is essential for continued progress in consumer financial education.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine the effect of consumers experiencing social exclusion on preference for high-risk financial products using an experimental design involving the manipulation of social exclusion/inclusion experiences. Data were collected from 148 consumers of mutual fund investment services via Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Findings

The study found that consumers experiencing social exclusion are more likely to make high risk investments. It also found that this effect is moderated by consumers' level of mental budgeting such that at high levels of mental budgeting the effect of social exclusion on investment choice is attenuated. The study further finds that the moderating effect of mental budgeting is mediated by pain of payment.

Social implications

The findings of this study suggest that policymakers can reduce unduly risky personal investment behavior by triggering mental budgeting thoughts using methods such as advertising and explicit mention of transaction fees.

Originality/value

The present study builds on existing research demonstrating the adverse behavioral consequences of social exclusion but refines our understanding by demonstrating the attenuating effect of mental budgeting and the mediating effect of pain of payment on high risk financial purchases.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Lamia Haque and Robert Rosenheck

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD…

Abstract

Purpose

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD and SUD who receive mental health and addiction treatment or correlates of such use.

Design/methodology/approach

Using national Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 data from the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the authors studied all 43,246 veterans diagnosed with both LD and SUD in FY 2012 and compared those who received mental health treatment (n = 30,456; 70.4%) to those who did not (n = 12,790; 29.6%).

Findings

Veterans who received mental health treatment were less like to be older than 75 years of age, more likely to have served during recent Middle East conflicts (Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom), more likely to have been recently homeless and to have drug dependence as contrasted with alcohol dependence when compared with those who did not receive mental health treatment. Although the majority, 70.4%, received mental health treatment, only 30.6% of the total received specialized addiction treatment, and these veterans were more likely to experience homelessness and have drug dependence diagnoses.

Originality/value

This is the first study as per the authors’ best knowledge that broadly examines mental health and addiction treatment received by veterans with LD and SUD. High rates of mental health treatment in this population likely reflect the integrated nature of the VHA and its emphasis on providing comprehensive services to homeless veterans. Further research is needed to identify barriers to specialized addiction treatment in this population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 56000