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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Coralia Sulea, Delia Virga, Laurentiu P. Maricutoiu, Wilmar Schaufeli, Catalina Zaborila Dumitru and Florin A. Sava

This study is based on the JD‐R model and aims at understanding the role of work engagement (WE) as a mediator between job resources (i.e. perceived organizational support) and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on the JD‐R model and aims at understanding the role of work engagement (WE) as a mediator between job resources (i.e. perceived organizational support) and positive extra‐role behaviors (i.e. organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB)), between job demands (i.e. interpersonal conflicts at work) and negative extra‐role behaviors (i.e. counterproductive work behaviors (CWB)), and also between a personal resource (i.e. conscientiousness) and both types of extra‐role behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from three Romanian organizations (n=258) were collected in a cross‐sectional study. Two main models (fully mediated and partially mediated) tested the role of WE as a mediator, using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results support the partially mediated model. All anticipated antecedents have a direct, and also an indirect relation with extra‐role behaviors – via WE. In addition, the mediating effect was stronger for OCB than for CWB. Overall, the results show that job and personal characteristics differentially predict OCB and CWB, and that employees' affective‐motivational state explains, in part, these job and personal characteristics – extra‐role behaviors associations.

Originality/value

The paper advances the knowledge about the JD‐R model and its relevance for OCB and CWB. In addition, understanding work engagement's potential to stimulate OCB and inhibit CWB can aid professionals to advance beneficial behavioral outcomes in organizations by promoting wellbeing at work, thereby supporting the employees' healthy career development.

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Zselyke Pap, Delia Vîrgă, Guy Notelaers and Laurențiu Maricuțoiu

The purpose of this current study was to investigate the moderating effect of autonomy (individual-level job resource) and social supportive climate (group-level job resource) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this current study was to investigate the moderating effect of autonomy (individual-level job resource) and social supportive climate (group-level job resource) on the negative relationship between job insecurity and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were gathered and analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling from 3,812 participants nested in 116 work units.

Findings

A significant interaction between job insecurity and autonomy offered support for the buffering hypothesis of autonomy. Hypotheses regarding both the direct and the buffering effect of social supportive climate were also supported, suggesting that shared perceptions of a supportive environment can reduce the negative impact of job insecurity on work engagement.

Practical implications

Focus on unit climate can aid practitioners in designing interventions that take into account the effects, and make use of resources that are shared in the work-group.

Originality/value

This study extends the job demands-resources theory, showing that resources exist not only at the level of the individual but also a group-level phenomenon, and interact with demands across levels.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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