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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Krista White and Caryn Radick

This paper aims to explore two separate legacy oral history digitization projects at one institution and how the project teams approached the different issues and challenges these…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore two separate legacy oral history digitization projects at one institution and how the project teams approached the different issues and challenges these projects presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach compares two case studies of how digitization of legacy oral history collections was carried out. The paper discusses these projects utilizing a lifecycle model approach and reveals how archival and digital humanities perspectives drove some of the projects’ differences.

Findings

The authors find that when working with digitizing legacy oral history collections, each collection will require different approaches and methods of problem solving. In large institutions with multiple repositories, it can be useful for project teams to consult each other to develop best practices.

Practical implications

The two case studies presented in this paper can serve as models for other institutions digitizing many oral history collections and serve as a model for communication and collaboration in larger institutions with multiple repositories.

Originality/value

This paper compares and contrasts two case studies of digitization projects involving legacy oral history collections in different units of one large institution. Project teams were influenced by different approaches. One project was conducted by archivists and the other led by a digital humanities librarian. Differing professional foci provided different perspectives about collection characteristics and, subsequently, led to different approaches that impacted implementation of the projects.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2023

Josephine G. Schuman and Dan Reynolds

Research has documented how white teachers often fall short of their anti-racist intentions. However, much of this research is done with preservice teachers or teachers across…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has documented how white teachers often fall short of their anti-racist intentions. However, much of this research is done with preservice teachers or teachers across disciplines. The authors investigate stories in which white English teachers who teach substantial proportions of black students and who self-reported anti-racist goals nevertheless fell short of those goals. The purpose of the study is to understand the tensions between racial liberalism and racial literacy in their pedagogy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors snowball sampled 12 veteran white high school English teachers (3–27 years’ experience) who taught in schools with substantial proportions of black students. The authors used a two-stage interview process to narrow the sample to 7 teachers who confirmed their anti-racist intentions and who wrote narratives of moments when they tried to be anti-racist, but the lesson failed in some way. The authors used a three-stage narrative analysis to analyze how racial liberalism and racial literacy were reflected in the narratives.

Findings

The veteran English teachers, despite their anti-racist intentions, told narratives that reflected racial liberalism, portraying racism as an individual and interpersonal phenomenon. Some narratives showed teachers who had taken steps toward racial literacy, but no narratives showed a fully developed sense of racial literacy, portraying the layers of institutional and structural racism in English education.

Originality/value

The sample suggests that veteran white English teachers are subject to similar limited racial literacies as novice teachers. While the authors found glimmers of racial literacy, they still note the work necessary to equip veteran English teachers with the racial literacies necessary for anti-racist instruction. The authors propose directions for teacher education, systemic support and professional development.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Randy Yerrick and Monica Ridgeway

This chapter employs multiple frameworks to establish the need for and the promise of culturally inclusive science literacy strategies for urban United States contexts. Relevant…

Abstract

This chapter employs multiple frameworks to establish the need for and the promise of culturally inclusive science literacy strategies for urban United States contexts. Relevant frameworks for inclusive science education include (but are not limited to) science literacy by discourse norms found in Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and National Research Council (NRC) reform documents and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. Science education research has demonstrated that traditional notions of literacy have historically led to exclusion of diversity among successful science students. In part, an assessment driven narrow representation of science in schools has led to a growing opportunity gap for children of colour, particularly in urban settings in the United States. Culturally based best practices in teaching science literacy can aid in the achievement of underrepresented science students as research continues to demonstrate the need for culturally relevant curriculum materials which recognise diverse cultural perspectives and contributions in science.

Details

Inclusive Principles and Practices in Literacy Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-590-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2023

Krista E. Leh, Linda Kay Mayger and Christina Yuknis

This study investigated how superintendents lead the process of within-district racial and socioeconomic integration.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated how superintendents lead the process of within-district racial and socioeconomic integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology to analyze interviews with superintendents, documents and videos from four school districts in suburban, southeastern Pennsylvania.

Findings

The emergent “Leadership for In-District Integration” theory indicated that superintendents who led redistricting initiatives aligned their systems for organizational equity only after developing culturally competent leadership practices and building trusting relationships within the school community. Despite these efforts, only two of the four districts achieved racial or socioeconomic balance in the targeted grade levels. In all districts the efforts to integrate their schools for equity were ongoing.

Practical implications

The current study's findings indicate that school leaders may face less conflict with constituents about school desegregation if they capitalize on existing needs to redraw district boundaries for other purposes. Superintendents seeking to engage in such work should set clear goals for what constitutes desegregation, view integration as more than demographic balancing and seek support to develop culturally competent leadership practices that build trusting relationships among community members.

Originality/value

The Leadership for In-District Integration theory adds conceptual and practical value to the field of educational administration by effectively illustrating what it meant to superintendents to integrate a school system and revealing insights that may help other school leaders make such a change. This research is significant because it is one of the few studies that focuses primarily on leadership factors associated with integration within suburban school districts.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Christine Naschberger and Krista Finstad-Milion

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how French managers picture their careers, specifically female careers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how French managers picture their careers, specifically female careers.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was composed of 93 women and 5 men attending a professional women’s networking event in France. Participants answered a questionnaire, including images to choose from to best describe how they perceived their own career development.

Findings

The results indicate that a female career is closely associated with work-life balance by both women and men. Also, women acknowledge three times more than men, the existence of a glass ceiling in their organisation. Women and men choose both traditional and contemporary images of career.

Research limitations/implications

As the sample was taken from a women’s network event, the male sample size is small. Despite the small sample of men, giving voice to male participants leads to rich insights which challenge gendered and non-gendered career models.

Practical implications

On an individual level, reflection on one’s career path fosters awareness and ownership of career choices. Further, working with career images enhances discussion and experience sharing about personal career choices, and offers opportunities to organisations concerned with developing female talent.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the career literature by providing insights into how female and male managers perceive female careers. The study’s originality lies in the methodology, based on using images of careers to better understand how managers picture their own careers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2018

Krista M. Soria and Linnette Werner

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether students’ completion of an introductory leadership minor course is associated with their first-year retention and their four-year…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether students’ completion of an introductory leadership minor course is associated with their first-year retention and their four-year graduation or continued enrollment. The authors used propensity score matching techniques and discovered that first-year students who enrolled in an academic leadership course had significantly greater odds of retention, graduation in four years (over withdrawal), and continued enrollment in four years (over withdrawal) compared to their peers who did not enroll in an introductory leadership minor course.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2014

Krista M. Soria, Deeqa Hussein and Carolyn Vue

This study examined the associations between undergraduate students’ socioeconomic background (i.e., first-generation status and household income) and their participation as…

Abstract

This study examined the associations between undergraduate students’ socioeconomic background (i.e., first-generation status and household income) and their participation as positional leaders at six large, public research universities. Results from logistic regressions predicting positional leadership in student organizations suggested that first-generation students and students from low-income backgrounds were significantly less likely to participate in positional leadership positions controlling for demographic, environmental, and leadership interest variables.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence…

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Abstract

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Theodore Greene

This chapter draws on 10 years of ethnographic fieldwork collected in gay bars from three American cities to explore the strategies LGBTQ subcultures deploy to recreate meaningful…

Abstract

This chapter draws on 10 years of ethnographic fieldwork collected in gay bars from three American cities to explore the strategies LGBTQ subcultures deploy to recreate meaningful places within the vestiges of local queer nightlife. As gentrification and social acceptance accelerate the closures of LGBTQ-specific bars and nightclubs worldwide, venues that once served a specific LGBTQ subculture (i.e., leather bars) expand their offerings to incorporate displaced LGBTQ subcultures. Attending to how LGBTQ subcultures might appropriate designated spaces within a gay venue to support community (nightlife complexes), how management and LGBT subcultures temporally circumscribe subcultural practices and traditions to create fleeting, but recurring places (episodic places), and how patrons might disrupt an existing production of place by imposing practices associated with a discrepant LGBTQ subculture(place ruptures), this chapter challenges the notion of “the gay bar” as a singular place catering to a specific subculture. Instead, gay bars increasingly constitute a collection of places within the same space, which may shift depending on its use by patrons occupying the space at any given moment. Beyond the investigation of gay bars, this chapter contributes to the growing sociological literature exploring the multifaceted, unstable, and ephemeral nature of place and place-making in the postmodern city.

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Krista Hoffmeister, Konstantin P. Cigularov, Julie Sampson, John C. Rosecrance and Peter Y. Chen

The present study aims to provide a perspective on effective mentoring in the construction industry by examining key mentor characteristics as perceived by construction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to provide a perspective on effective mentoring in the construction industry by examining key mentor characteristics as perceived by construction professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 170 union construction workers rated 55 mentor characteristics based on to what extent each was characteristic of a superior, average, or poor mentor.

Findings

To identify the most important mentor characteristics, three criteria were relied on: means of characteristic ratings of a superior mentor; effect sizes of mean differences between ratings of poor and superior mentors; and correlations between characteristic ratings of superior mentors and satisfaction with mentors. Significant mean differences were found between characteristics of poor and average mentors as well as between poor and superior mentors.

Research limitations/implications

Possible future directions include an investigation of the relationship between competent mentors and personal characteristics, and potential health and safety outcomes resulting from effective mentoring in the construction industry.

Originality/value

Although mentoring has been the focus of much research, the mentoring relationship is quite different in the construction industry and little mentoring research has targeted this industry. To develop an effective mentoring program in this industry, one of the initial steps is to identify characteristics of effective mentors in this industry.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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