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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2023

Ian Fillis, Kim Lehman and Mark Wickham

The purpose of this paper is to assess the notion of art as a product. This paper develops a detailed understanding of how established visual artists engage with the notion in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the notion of art as a product. This paper develops a detailed understanding of how established visual artists engage with the notion in their art making and market interactions, drawing insight from the longitudinal debate on the essence of art, including its connection with entrepreneurial marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors uses a conceptual framework involving artists’ and other stakeholders’ philosophical positions, artists’ career stages, reputation (including branding), market associations and the forms of value generated by artists and consumers to help shape their qualitative research design involving in-depth interviews with 16 established Australian artists. NVivo software aided data analysis to improve theory building.

Findings

Market orientation, entrepreneurial market creation, co-creation, co-production activities and sharing value among interested stakeholders are important factors in viewing art as a commercial product. Sustainable value creation is also crucial. Key emergent themes were motivation to create, engagement with the market and artists’ attitudes towards art as a product. This paper identifies a fluidity in the relationship between an artist and their art.

Research limitations/implications

Co-creation, co-production and sharing value among interested stakeholders are important factors as are market orientation versus entrepreneurial market creation activities. Sustainable value creation is also crucial. Key emergent themes were motivation to create, engagement with the market and artists’ attitudes towards art as a product.

Practical implications

Established artists have made a conscious decision to engage, or otherwise with the marketplace. This research uncovers the merits of adopting a product approach in engaging with the market and artist centred creation which avoids marketplace interaction.

Originality/value

This research has the potential to contribute to policy decision-making in the sector and in stimulating future comparative research. There are wider implications for the cultural and creative industries where entrepreneurial market creation can stimulate creativity and innovation.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Ian Fillis and Kim Lehman

The authors adopt a biographical methodology to investigate how a privately funded art museum has risen to become a key visitor destination on the island of Tasmania, Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors adopt a biographical methodology to investigate how a privately funded art museum has risen to become a key visitor destination on the island of Tasmania, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilise both entrepreneurship and consumption as collecting lenses to gain insight into the success of a new arts venture. In addition to biographical methodology the authors utilise in-depth interviews and participant observation.

Findings

The analysis shows what can be achieved when alternative paths to creativity and innovation are pursued. The creativity inherent in such actions does not necessarily have to be substantial. Sometimes incremental approaches to achieving something different from the norm are sufficient.

Research limitations/implications

Implications include the continued merits of adopting a biographical approach to uncovering longitudinal insight into interlinking entrepreneurship and consumption practices. This approach enables key impacting events over time to be identified as they impact on the direction taken by the art entrepreneur.

Practical implications

There is growing evidence that administrative approaches to arts governance are limiting in their effectiveness. This paper addresses the call to be more entrepreneurial in arts governance practices.

Originality/value

There are only a limited number of papers on entrepreneurship and consumption in the arts and this research adds to knowledge in the area.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Mark Wickham, Kim Lehman and Ian Fillis

This paper explores the nature of art as a product through a network perspective, accounting for key contributing stakeholders in shaping its essence.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the nature of art as a product through a network perspective, accounting for key contributing stakeholders in shaping its essence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative data collection and analysis design and is centred on a series of face-to-face interviews with established Australian visual artists.

Findings

Results support the notion of an art product shaped by interconnections and interdependencies of actors in the art market. In particular, attention is paid to the roles of actors in conceptual, production and distribution networks.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are idiosyncrasies that (in part) define the Australian art market context, the issues identified here are nonetheless useful in determining the nature of the interconnectedness of the art market in other similar Western contexts. Many Australian artists have achieved similar recognition and status to other established artists elsewhere. Future cross-cultural comparative research should be carried out in order to assess this relationship in the longer term.

Practical implications

Artists at different stages of their careers can transfer the findings of this research into the development of a series of relevant strategies and tactics for developing their art and culture products more effectively.

Originality/value

Although philosophical assessments of art as a product have been carried out elsewhere, there is a lack of evaluation from an art versus marketplace lens in considering the perspectives of interested stakeholders

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Ian Fillis, Kim Lehman, Ruth Rentschler and Boram Lee

This paper aims to provide clarity on arts marketing during COVID-19 by undertaking a critical review and theoretical integration of published cultural and creative industries…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide clarity on arts marketing during COVID-19 by undertaking a critical review and theoretical integration of published cultural and creative industries (CCIs) data on the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on the findings from a content analysis of published refereed journal articles and research reports, between 2020 and 2022.

Findings

This study clarifies how scholars in the arts marketing field have examined the concept and identified core dimensions. It also brings together these conceptual categories into an integrative multilevel framework of relevance for arts marketing during COVID-19. The framework outlines interconnected processes as well as dualities, such as digitisation, monetisation and sustainability of the CCIs and poses a future centred on entrepreneurial actions.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is that it provides clear-cut evidence for new frontiers for research in the field during a period of discontinuous change due to COVID-19, through a literature review that has not been undertaken previously. It links the need to be entrepreneurial as a means for the CCIs to survive and thrive during and after a global crisis.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2022

Ian Fillis and Kim Lehman

The authors provide an understanding of how the hero identity is culturally constructed and evolving. The authors focus on heroism within an arts marketing framework through an…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors provide an understanding of how the hero identity is culturally constructed and evolving. The authors focus on heroism within an arts marketing framework through an interrogation of Northern Ireland murals. In this paper, the authors elaborate on the links between arts marketing thought and the notion of hero and draw conclusions around what the authors see as a fruitful area for arts marketing theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have adopted a narrative approach, incorporating biographical method, visual analysis and ethnography in interpreting cultural murals. The authors assess representative examples in Northern Ireland using a thematic framework.

Findings

The murals the authors assessed have evolved from having a specific community focus to increasing numbers which now represent a “shared”, and therefore more modern version of the hero.

Research limitations/implications

The authors identify an emerging, aesthetically balanced portrayal of cultural murals, with a different set of heroic priorities compared to the past, which should encourage further related research elsewhere.

Practical implications

Northern Ireland murals are no longer the preserve of specific communities and are now also shared spaces which appeal to both the local population and cultural tourists.

Originality/value

Although analysis and evaluation of political murals has been carried out in other disciplines, the authors add to the limited insight from an arts marketing perspective.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Kim Lehman, Ian Fillis and Mark Wickham

The overall aim of this chapter is to investigate whether the notion of cultural value can have utility as a context for urban and regional development strategies. It does this by…

Abstract

The overall aim of this chapter is to investigate whether the notion of cultural value can have utility as a context for urban and regional development strategies. It does this by proposing a conceptualisation of ‘cultural assets’ that encompasses both tangible and intangible resources, as well as resources existing and yet to be created. The purpose of the conceptualisation is to establish a framework within which we can better understand how cultural value might be activated or generated in urban and regional areas and so become a context for developmental strategies. Importantly, this paper also sets out to provide further insight into the notion of cultural value itself, particularly in relation to matters of definition, and the notion's utility in other areas of theory and practice.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

Abstract

Details

Exploring Cultural Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-515-4

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Nara Jeong and Nari Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of political orientation on corporate social (ir)responsibility. In specific, it investigates CEO political liberalism, and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of political orientation on corporate social (ir)responsibility. In specific, it investigates CEO political liberalism, and its moderation with government political liberalism on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate social irresponsibility (CSIR).

Design/methodology/approach

Panel regression analysis was conducted using 3,136 firm-year observations of 751 CEOs in the USA.

Findings

Results show that the effects of CEO liberalism are positive on CSR and negative on CSIR. During the reign of a democrat president, however, CEO political liberalism shows different impacts on CSR and CSIR. Interactions between the same political orientations are negatively associated with CSR, but not significantly associated with CSIR.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper is in presenting the interactive effects of external environment and CEO attributions on CSIR.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of 839