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Article

Morgan P. Miles, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Andrew McAuley and Kevin Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while remaining economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 2014 of university executives and found that universities in Australia are rapidly transitioning from public supported institutions to an organizational form much more like social enterprise, with all of the organizational, marketing and ethical ramifications.

Findings

Australian universities were found to be focused on maintaining financial viability and that the most significant source of future revenue for Australian universities is perceived to be from international students.

Originality/value

The findings have tremendous public policy and ethical implications – suggesting a shift in the classification of university education from what was generally considered a public good to what is increasingly perceived as a private good in the contemporary market place, with the increasing importance of international students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

John Overby, Mike Rayburn, David C. Wyld and Kevin Hammond

Epidemiologists are concerned the next deadly global cognition will be a new kind of deadly flu which humans have no resistance. Since the 1960s, their alarm has been…

Abstract

Epidemiologists are concerned the next deadly global cognition will be a new kind of deadly flu which humans have no resistance. Since the 1960s, their alarm has been focused on a bird (avian) virus (H5N1). This virus is generally harmless in its host species, but it is extremely deadly when contracted by humans. H5N1 mutates quickly and tends to pick up genes from flu viruses that affect other species. The flu is far more contagious and harder to contain than the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus. It is projected that 30‐40 per cent of the population would be infected in a H5N1 flu pandemic, and as many as one‐third would die. The 1918 Spanish flu caused 20 to 50 million deaths world wide. One scientist observed that the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic could have caused civilisation to disappear within a few weeks. Currently, more than 50 million chickens have been slaughtered in eight Asian countries in efforts to curb the spread of avian influenza. This article examines the roots and dangers of the potential avian influenza pandemic, examining the business and social ramifications that could ensue if the worst case scenario occurs.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Kevin L. Hammond, Harry A. Harmon and Robert L. Webster

Extending a previous study of business schools across the USA, this further analysis of the research data aims to investigate the organizational deployment of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Extending a previous study of business schools across the USA, this further analysis of the research data aims to investigate the organizational deployment of the selection of strategic marketing initiatives prescribed by a national quality programme, and to cross‐index the results to the organisational characteristics of the responding institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by postal questionnaire from the deans of 225 business schools. Descriptive statistics analyze organizational characteristics, marketing planning activities and the use of “faculty awards” for an identified set of performance groups. Cluster analysis identifies distinct segments representing unique combinations of marketing activities undertaken and awards used. Performance levels are compared across the clusters, and the typical organizational structures of their members described.

Findings

Analysis yields marketing intelligence relating to the extent that eight categories of strategic marketing effort are deployed by the best and worst performing business schools in the sample. Common patterns are identified, and attributed to organizational types. It is clear that pre‐requisites for performance excellence are the existence of a formal mission statement, the practice of formal marketing planning, and the planned use of motivational rewards to faculty. But, it is equally clear that too many business schools are content with the status quo, which is not typified by these attributes.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this analysis is limited in a number of identified respects. Implications for future research are discussed.

Practical implications

No one responsible for performance delivery in a business school practitioner should doubt that the benefits of planned strategic marketing are worth the commitment and effort required.

Originality/value

Uniquely, this study provides detailed empirical support to the application of marketing theory within the higher education context. The cross‐indexing of the findings to the various organizational types permits planners to compare practice in other business schools, both in their peer group and in the sector as a whole.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

John Overby, Mike Rayburn, Kevin Hammond and David C. Wyld

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and…

Abstract

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and risky. The worldwide economic downturn and slow growth in domestic markets are forcing companies to depend more than ever on overseas trade. SARS emerged in China in November 2002 and has spread to 26 countries. The SARS epidemic has caused the most severe economic crisis in Southeast Asia since the wave of bank failures and currency devaluations that swept the region five years ago. The SARS epidemic has prompted health officials to implement travel advisories and restrictions, in order to defer nonessential travel to regions of Asia with large numbers of SARS cases. They are enforcing quarantine and isolation measures in major cities to try and limit the spread of SARS. The President of the United States has signed an executive order adding SARS to the list of communicable diseases that can be quarantined. A major disruption in China could paralyze just‐in‐time supply chains and cause an economic crisis for retailers and other businesses worldwide. The SARS epidemic has caused many economists to drastically reduce their economic‐growth forecasts for Asia. New infectious diseases, such as SARS, can emerge and easily travel around the globe, infecting less‐resilient hosts and mutating because of the influence of viruses and bacteria in their new environment. Health officials are even more concerned about the pandemic disaster that hasn’t happened, but may still. However, the SARS epidemic has created positive economic benefits for some companies.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article

Kevin L. Hammond and Robert L. Webster

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a survey of business schools examining the impact of market orientation on overall business school performance. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a survey of business schools examining the impact of market orientation on overall business school performance. The authors extend previous research by examining the possible moderating influence of accrediting body affiliation and administrative position of key informants on the relationships between the components of market orientation (customer orientation, competitor orientation, and inter-functional coordination) and overall performance for each of three markets (student, parent, and employer). Research objectives are stated in terms of 18 hypotheses.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply moderated regression analysis following the methodology used by Sharma, Durand, and Gur-Arie (1981) and Slater and Narver (1994), examining the variable relationships within schools affiliated through two accrediting bodies, from the perspective of business school deans and chief academic officers.

Findings

Results suggest moderating effects for three of the 18 relationships that were tested. Intelligence gathered from survey research within higher education is indicated to vary somewhat depending on key informant characteristics (accrediting body affiliation and administrative position in this study).

Practical implications

These results have practical implications for strategic planning within higher education. A better understanding of the differences within higher education will assist decision makers in responding to intelligence gathered within their own university, and will also assist them with strategies involving other universities (such as competitors or global partners).

Originality/value

These results within higher education have implications for survey research more broadly, supporting concerns by Phillips (1981) and others that researchers be mindful of key informant characteristics and other factors that could bias their judgments regarding organizational properties and other variables under investigation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Kevin Hammond, Harry Harmon, Robert Webster and Mike Rayburn

This article reports the application of marketing planning in an unusual context. It reports the results of a national survey of business school deans in the USA, and…

Abstract

This article reports the application of marketing planning in an unusual context. It reports the results of a national survey of business school deans in the USA, and examines the possible effects on university business school performance of the use or non‐use of selected marketing planning activities and of selected faculty awards (proxy indicators of the level of importance that business schools might place on certain areas of faculty effort). The relationships that these activities and awards have with one another are measured. Best practices are identified. The number of respondents who employ the various marketing practices is reported, conclusions drawn, limitations identified, and suggestions made for future research.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Harry A. Harmon, Gene Brown, Robert E. Widing and Kevin L. Hammond

Observes that previous research on the value and effect of supervisory feedback has focused on the recipient of the feedback (the salesperson). The research reported in…

Abstract

Observes that previous research on the value and effect of supervisory feedback has focused on the recipient of the feedback (the salesperson). The research reported in this article examines the feedback construct from the provider’s perspective (the sales manager). Explores the relationship between Sujan’s failed sales effort attribution model and the feedback provided typology developed by Jaworski and Kohli. The results confirm a direct relationship between failed sales effort attributed to poor strategy and positive feedback directed to salesperson behavior. A direct relationship is reported between the failed sales effort attributed to lack of effort (or intensity) and negative feedback provided by the sales manager that is directed to the salesperson’s output.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Content available
Article

Keith Crosier

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Sharon Dotger and Deborah Walsh

– The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on elementary students’ observational drawings, which were produced from two science lesson study cycles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collaboratively studied student work from two science research lessons. The authors evaluated 50 students’ science notebook entries, paying specific attention to their observational sketches. The authors wanted to understand how fourth grade students approach observational drawing in science class to better inform science and art pedagogy.

Findings

Students represented their observations in a variety of ways. The structure of the lessons might have influenced students’ drawings, as did students’ orientation when constructing their representations.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited in that it only analyzes observational drawing from two research lessons.

Practical implications

Through cross-disciplinary collaboration between a science educator and an art teacher, the authors developed shared ideas that were applicable in both spaces. In the near term, the authors have each changed the instructional practices to include more observational drawing.

Social implications

This paper could impact public attitudes about the inclusion of science and art in the elementary curriculum. The authors would expect that through articulating the purpose of observational drawing for the artist and the scientist, the public would be more supportive of teaching these skills in school.

Originality/value

This paper documents teacher learning across two content areas which students have limited access to in the USA during elementary school. It explains how science and art share objectives and can thus advocate for each other’s inclusion in the school day.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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