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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Andrew Kirk, Kevin Armstrong, Niina Nurkka and Annette Jinks

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive practice…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore English and Finnish paramedic perceptions of the healthcare blame culture, its relationship to complaints, the use of defensive practice and if this impacts on paramedic practice and clinical care.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited from English and Finnish ambulance services that have similar organisational and professional scopes of practice. The aim was to gain insight into the similarities and differences between the countries regarding the existence of a blame culture in paramedic practice. Semi-structured focus groups and interviews involving 20 English and Finnish paramedics were undertaken. Qualitative perceptions concerning the reality of a blame culture in paramedic practice and its impact on professional roles were sought.

Findings

Three major themes that were identified in the thematic analysis included: blame culture and its influences; the impact of complaints against paramedics; and the use of defensive practice within their roles. These data themes were similar for both groups of participants. The majority of participants thought the healthcare blame culture to be widespread and believed that this was likely to directly influence paramedics’ working practices.

Originality/value

Whilst the impact of blame culture and complaints on the medical profession has previously been examined, this study makes an important contribution by exploring the factors that impact on paramedics’ lives and their practice, within two European countries. The inappropriate use of social media by some members of the public in both countries was a disturbing issue for many participants and was identified as an area for further research.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Paresh Wankhade and DeMond S. Miller

321

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

James Martin Cronin, Mary McCarthy and Mary Delaney

The purpose of this paper is to build an understanding of what we term “consumer discipline” by unpacking the practices and strategies by which people manage and exert control…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build an understanding of what we term “consumer discipline” by unpacking the practices and strategies by which people manage and exert control over what they consume. This is facilitated by looking at the context of food, an everyday necessity imbued with sizeable importance in terms of its impact on personal well-being, and how it is experienced by individuals who must manage the constraints of a chronic illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the Foucauldian concept of governmentality and theories surrounding the social facilitation of self-management, this paper analyses interviews with 17 consumers diagnosed with diabetes or coronary heart disease.

Findings

By exploring how the chronically ill generate different strategies in managing what they eat and how they think about it, this paper outlines four analytical areas to continue the discussion of how consumption is disciplined and its conceptualisation in marketing and health-related research: “the Individual”, “the Other”, “the Market” and “the Object”.

Practical implications

The results signal to policymakers the aspects of health promotion that can be enhanced to improve self-management amongst consumers in the pursuit of well-being.

Originality/value

This paper makes two contributions: it conceptualises consumer discipline as a practice that involves self-control but also comprises the capabilities to self-manage one’s identity and relationships through leveraging personal and social strategies across various contexts; and it identifies macro influences such as the market as negotiable powers that can be contested or resisted to help assist in one’s self-management.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

David W. Taylor, Oswald Jones and Kevin Boles

According to Woolcock, social capital can be defined as the “norms and networks facilitating collective action for mutual benefit”. Furthermore, Gabbay and Leenders suggest that…

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Abstract

According to Woolcock, social capital can be defined as the “norms and networks facilitating collective action for mutual benefit”. Furthermore, Gabbay and Leenders suggest that social capital offers some potential for integrating the proliferation of network research that has been developed over the last 30 years. Examines an innovatory partnership between Manchester Metropolitan University Business School (MMUBS) and a number of agencies including the Prince's Trust to provide skills to entrepreneurs from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. The New Entrepreneur Scholarship Scheme (NESS) was the result of an initiative by the Chancellor Gordon Brown to encourage higher education institutes to make a larger contribution to the UK's entrepreneurial culture. MMUBS piloted the first NESS programme for 18 nascent entrepreneurs. It was decided to adopt an “action‐learning” approach concentrating on the development of a realistic business idea as well as creating a supportive environment within the group. This intervention has aided NESS participants by building and strengthening networks that become the basis of their social capital.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Abstract

Details

School-to-School Collaboration: Learning Across International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-669-5

Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2011

Philip Kotler

The author describes how he entered the marketing field and describes his contributions in four sections: articles written, books published, students nurtured, and executives…

Abstract

The author describes how he entered the marketing field and describes his contributions in four sections: articles written, books published, students nurtured, and executives consulted and trained. He describes his contributions to the marketing field in nine areas: marketing theory and orientations, improving the role and practice of marketing, analytical marketing, the social and ethical side of marketing, globalization and international marketing competition, marketing in the new economy, creating and managing the product mix, strategic marketing, and broadening the concept and application of marketing.

Details

Review of Marketing Research: Special Issue – Marketing Legends
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-897-8

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Kevin Baird, Sophia Xia Su and Nuraddeen Nuhu

This study examines the mediating role of the fairness of performance appraisal on the association between the extent of use of strategic performance measurement systems (SPMSs…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the mediating role of the fairness of performance appraisal on the association between the extent of use of strategic performance measurement systems (SPMSs) with SPMS effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey distributed to 656 Australian middle and lower level managers.

Findings

The findings reveal that informational fairness mediates the association between SPMSs (link to value drivers and the use of multidimensional performance measures) with performance-related outcomes; procedural fairness mediates the association between SPMSs (link to strategy and the use of multidimensional performance measures) with staff-related outcomes and distributive fairness mediates the association between the use of SPMSs (all three types) with both performance and staff-related outcomes.

Originality/value

The study provides a unique insight into the importance of fairness (the distributive, informational and procedural fairness of the performance appraisal system) in mediating the associations between the extent of use of SPMSs and SPMS effectiveness. The findings contribute to the human resource management (HRM) “black box” literature by providing an insight into the behavioural mechanism through which a specific human resource management practice (i.e. the SPMS) influences organisational performance.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce …

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Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Joanne Neary, Christopher Chapman, Stuart Hall and Kevin Lowden

This chapter explores the Scottish government policy drive for school improvement through processes such as distributed leadership, empowerment and cross-school collaboration to…

Abstract

This chapter explores the Scottish government policy drive for school improvement through processes such as distributed leadership, empowerment and cross-school collaboration to school settings. Compared to other nations, this shift towards collaboration has been relatively slow, but reflects the history of Scottish education, one where there is a reduced emphasis on individualist/competitive cultures and instead focuses on social justice and equity. This chapter discusses two programmes of work that were developed to foster school-to-school collaboration in the Scottish education system. In doing so, we comment on the conflict between national priority setting and the translation of this agenda at the local level by different local authorities.

Details

School-to-School Collaboration: Learning Across International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-669-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Venessa Suet Yee Cheung, Joey Chung Yi Lo, Dickson K.W. Chiu and Kevin K.W. Ho

This study aims to evaluate social media’s communication effectiveness on travel product promotion among college students in Hong Kong. As traveling has become a popular activity…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate social media’s communication effectiveness on travel product promotion among college students in Hong Kong. As traveling has become a popular activity, promoting travel products via social network sites (SNSs) has become common. Thus, identifying factors that affect shopping decisions is vital to tourism businesses. While the number of people using social communication tools has increased quickly, social media marketing provides a new strategy for the local travel business to sell and promote their products online.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the attention, interest, desire and action (AIDA) marketing communication model to explore the influence of Facebook on the marketing of travel products among youngsters. Because Facebook is the most widely used social media platform in Hong Kong, it was selected for this study. An online survey was conducted via Google Form to collect responses from students of different local universities.

Findings

The findings indicate that our respondents consider purchasing travel products according to brand, discount and customer comments. They generally perceived Facebook advertising as a platform that could deliver various updated travel promotions and discounts, which can be adequately explained based on the AIDA model. However, respondents were unwilling to recommend the travel company to their friends on Facebook, even if they were satisfied with the travel products after purchase. Also, Facebook promotion could positively influence, draw the attention and make travel desire of the customer, but no positive influence to arouse their interest.

Originality/value

Although there are many studies on the travel industry’s marketing and social media, scant studies have investigated the influence of social media on the promotion of travel products with the AIDA model. In particular, it is crucial to explore what factors can affect young people’s decision-making, their perception of social media advertising and how marketers can make good use of this channel.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

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