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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Kerry Walsh and Jiju Antony

The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges and gaps in using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system from a commercial supplier to an acute…

1704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges and gaps in using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system from a commercial supplier to an acute health care setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used action diary, documentation and triangulation to obtain an understanding of the challenges and gaps.

Findings

The paper provides health care with further understanding of the complexity, challenges and gaps of using an electronic adverse incident recording system to improve patient safety.

Originality/value

This paper explains the important views of clinicians and managers in relation to improving patient safety by using an electronic adverse incident management system.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Kerry Walsh, Calvin Burns and Jiju Antony

The purpose of this study is to assess attitudes toward and use of an electronic adverse incident reporting system in all four hospitals in one National Health Service Scotland…

1709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess attitudes toward and use of an electronic adverse incident reporting system in all four hospitals in one National Health Service Scotland Health Board area.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to assess medical consultants', managers', and nurses' attitudes and perceptions about electronic adverse incident reporting. Actual adverse incident reporting data were also analysed.

Findings

The main findings from this study are that consultants, managers, and nurses all had positive attitudes about responsibility for reporting adverse incidents. All respondents indicated that the design of and information collected by the electronic adverse incident reporting system (Datix) was adequate but consultants had more negative attitudes and perceptions than managers and nurses about Datix. All respondents expressed negative attitudes about the amount and type of feedback they receive from reporting, and consultants expressed more negative attitudes about how Datix is managed than managers and nurses. Analysis of adverse incident reporting data found that the proportion of consultants using Datix to report incidents was significantly lower than that of managers and nurses.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that there are no additional barriers to incident reporting associated with the use of a bespoke electronic adverse incident reporting system as compared to other types of systems. Although an electronic adverse incident reporting system may be able to increase incident reporting and facilitate organisational learning by making it easier to report incidents and analyse incident reporting data, strong leadership within hospitals/healthcare professions (or healthcare subcultures) is still required in order to promote and sustain incident reporting to improve patient safety.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate attitudes toward and reporting behaviour on a bespoke electronic adverse incident reporting system in hospitals.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Kerry Walsh and Jiju Antony

The purpose of this paper is to examine the usability and potential of incorporating quality costs into an electronic adverse incident recording system within a healthcare sector.

1027

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the usability and potential of incorporating quality costs into an electronic adverse incident recording system within a healthcare sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general review and a discussion of an electronic adverse incident‐recording system into the potential benefits and restrictions was undertaken. Articles containing both information systems and quality costs were reviewed in order to explore the potential of linking information against patient safety issues.

Findings

The paper finds that quality costs is a valid and useful approach for measuring the impact of individual adverse incidents or trends in order to support managers and clinicians to develop appropriate action plans to reduce levels of patient harm and thereby improve patient safety. The paper also shows that quality costs can be used to support managers and clinicians and are commercially designed to improve the detection, investigation and action planning to improve service quality and patient safety.

Practical implications

Quality costs can be used as a driver for identifying potential high impact quality and patient safety projects within a healthcare setting.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information for designers of electronic adverse incident‐reporting systems to support managers and clinicians to utilise the benefits of quality costing in order to strengthen and re‐focus patient safety issues in healthcare.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Kerry Walsh and Jiju Antony

There are three main objectives of the research presented in this paper: to examine the challenges of using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system; to…

1161

Abstract

Purpose

There are three main objectives of the research presented in this paper: to examine the challenges of using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system; to assess the method of using a prevention appraisal and failure model; and to identify the benefits of using quality costs in conjunction with incident reporting systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Action diary, documentation and triangulation are used to obtain an understanding of the challenges and critical success factors in using quality costing within an adverse incident recording and reporting system.

Findings

The paper provides healthcare professionals with the critical success factors for developing quality costing into an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system. This approach would provide clinicians, managers and directors with information on patient safety issues following the effective use of data from an electronic adverse incident reporting and recording system.

Originality/value

This paper makes an attempt of using a prevention, appraisal and failure model (PAF) within a quality‐costing framework in relation to improving patient safety within an electronic adverse incident reporting and recording system.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

46

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Jennifer Bowerman

365

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

William J. Ritchie, George Young, Ali M. Shahzad, Robert W. Kolodinsky and Steven A. Melnyk

The purpose of this paper is to explore product adoption beliefs and actions of a large retail food organization with both corporate-owned stores and privately held franchise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore product adoption beliefs and actions of a large retail food organization with both corporate-owned stores and privately held franchise stores.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a case study approach involving survey data collection from 190 corporate-owned and licensed retail outlets that were members of a large, single organization. Ordinary least squares regression and mean differences (t-tests) were used to test the data. Findings were elaborated upon based upon structured interviews.

Findings

Corporate-owned retail outlets invested heavily in food safety innovation, while franchised retail outlets pursued minimal investment to retain product flexibility. The level of adoption is contingent upon ownership structure, as well as institutional forces emanating from the corporate environment, the customer, and peer organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings offer greater insight into methodological issues associated with measurement of new product adoption in particular. The authors have shown that it is critical for researchers to clarify the level of analysis of the study. Quantitative survey analysis revealed both safety and economic motivations to be desirable issues in product adoption considerations. However, when quantitative and qualitative results were combined, very different outcomes were realized as ownership structure differences appear to dominate product adoption decisions. Therefore, when conducting plural organizational form research, the data gathering efforts must be carefully undertaken to ensure that critical drivers of phenomena explored are not overlooked.

Practical implications

Adoption of new product adoption involves the complex interplay between ownership structure/control, economic cost/benefit, managerial choice, and societal norms. Often, organizational research relating to adoption of new processes and innovations collects individual-level data. However, this study shows that adoption decisions occur at multiple levels and that the ownership/structural context must be considered.

Social implications

The study has implications from social innovation/responsibility perspectives. Recent press regarding food safety has put pressure on food processing establishments to consider methods of reducing food safety breaches. No doubt, this has alerted the consumer to potential risks in food processing and influenced their preferences in favor of food safety innovations. Nonetheless, perceptions of the importance of “safety” can be interpreted in a variety of ways, leading to differing courses of action. Interviews with corporate-level executives revealed that they preferred both corporate-owned and franchised retail outlets adopt case ready (CR) meats to stem safety concerns. Yet, this aspiration diffused throughout the organization differently.

Originality/value

Multiple organizational structure forms operating within the same organizational entity, or “plural form” organizations, offer unique opportunities for examination. Applying various theoretical lenses, including agency theory, the resource-based theory, and institutional theory, the authors offer rationale for why different structural types within the same corporate entity may differ in their beliefs and actions concerning product safety, cost, and adoption.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2017

Gianni Pirelli and Philip Witt

Although cultural competence is gaining increased attention among mental health practitioners, such primarily has centered on race, religion, ethnicity, language, and nationality…

Abstract

Purpose

Although cultural competence is gaining increased attention among mental health practitioners, such primarily has centered on race, religion, ethnicity, language, and nationality. Thus far, there has been relatively little recognition of specific socialized subcultures aside from the aforementioned groups, and virtually no discussion regarding those associated with various firearm-related subcultures. This topic is particularly relevant to mental health practitioners, as positions on firearm use and ownership frequently split across political party lines, and mental health professionals and academics are more likely to espouse liberal rather than conservative views. It follows that practitioners may understand little about firearms culture and, therefore, are at increased risk for biased decision making when working with clients for whom firearms have relevance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a conceptual approach to reviewing potential areas of bias in both clinical and clinical-forensic practice in the US context.

Findings

The authors detail the prevalence of firearm-related issues in the USA, contextualize firearm-related issues in forensic treatment and evaluation scenarios, delineate a number of firearm subgroups, and recommend considerations for mental health professionals to develop cultural competence as it relates to firearms and associated subcultures.

Originality/value

This is an original conceptual study of cultural competence and various firearm-related subcultures.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Richard R. Johnson, Robert L. Carraway, Ervin R. Shames and Paul W. Farris

Benecol Spread, a cholesterol-lowering margarine, was a product with unusual media-planning challenges. With a narrow target group and unproven market potential, Johnson & Johnson…

Abstract

Benecol Spread, a cholesterol-lowering margarine, was a product with unusual media-planning challenges. With a narrow target group and unproven market potential, Johnson & Johnson needed to get the most “bang for the buck” from its Benecol advertising. Would a media-planning model (optimizer) requiring executives to quantify their judgment on several key inputs be helpful in this process? A spreadsheet accompanying the case allows students to weight the target groups and to choose among different advertising vehicles to form the best possible media plan.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

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