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Article
Publication date: 22 April 1991

Heidi Hylton Meier

Measuring quality costs is becoming an increasingly more important task for accountants. This is especially true in light of new definitions and goals of quality programs…

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319

Abstract

Measuring quality costs is becoming an increasingly more important task for accountants. This is especially true in light of new definitions and goals of quality programs, which are primarily to produce goods and services with zero defects while preventing problems, improving reliablity and eliminating waste. This article examines how accountants can provide cost information using the traditional quality cost model along with expected value techniques so that managers may make more effective decisions to accomplish these goals.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Arvind Chopra and Dixit Garg

The purpose of this paper is to find out the behavior patterns of different quality cost categories to enable us to take the right decisions in allocating resources for…

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2852

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the behavior patterns of different quality cost categories to enable us to take the right decisions in allocating resources for reducing quality costs.

Design/methodology/approach

Costs of quality, existing in a small‐scale industry in India, in the financial year 2006‐2007, were found out. At the start of the financial year 2007‐2008 a quality cost program was implemented in that organization and more resources were allocated for prevention and appraisal cost activities. Subsequently, the costs of quality related to the financial year 2007‐2008 and 2008‐2009 were found out. Based on the quality cost data of three years, co‐relation co‐efficient between the different quality cost categories were calculated.

Findings

The co‐relation co‐efficient between different quality cost categories suggest that by increasing the efforts towards prevention and appraisal activities, costs of non conformance decrease. Furthermore, there exists positive co‐relation within costs of conformance and between costs of non conformance.

Orginality/value

In the competitive modern world, small scale organizations have limited resources. They do not have funds to hire consultants. So, the behaviour patterns of quality cost categories help these organizations to allocate precious resources more effectively and result in the reduction of quality costs thereby improving profitability.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

L. Brennan, H. Cullinane, C. O′Connor, D. Punch and J. Sheil

The determination of quality costs on a production line is discussed. An approach to quality costs analysis is developed and illustrated employing a particular production…

Abstract

The determination of quality costs on a production line is discussed. An approach to quality costs analysis is developed and illustrated employing a particular production line. This line which is devoted to the assembly and testing of an advanced computer system is fully described. A diagrammatic model of the production line is presented which displays points on the line at which quality costs can arise and the nature of these costs. A quality cost model for this line incorporating prevention, appraisal and failure cost elements is presented and their estimation discussed. It is argued that the modelling concept developed can provide a general framework for the isolation of quality costs.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Behdad Kiani, Hadi Shirouyehzad, Fahime Khoshsaligheh Bafti and Hamidreza Fouladgar

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for analysing the influence of costs of quality.

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3198

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for analysing the influence of costs of quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is designed by using a causal loop diagram and is analysed through a system dynamics approach. The model simulation is prepared by Vensim software.

Findings

Prevention and appraisal costs are the two effective cost factors. The model represented in this paper reveals that prevention costs have the most effect on total cost of quality and especially external failure costs. Hence, in order to achieve the customer expected quality level, prevention and appraisal costs should be considered.

Research limitations/implications

Calculating and measuring non‐conformance costs is very difficult in organizations and some errors and mistakes may happen.

Practical implications

A system dynamics approach can analyse and measure the amount of prevention cost effects on cost of quality in different organizations.

Originality/value

The proposed methodology demonstrates the use of an innovative approach in developing a cost of quality concept and constructing a practical framework for system dynamics in a real case.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Angel R. Martinez Lorente, Alejandrino Gallego Rodriguez and Louise Rawlins

Quality costs have been discussed widely in the literature. This discussion has not always agreed and it is possible to identify two basic schools of thought; one asserts…

Abstract

Quality costs have been discussed widely in the literature. This discussion has not always agreed and it is possible to identify two basic schools of thought; one asserts the existence of a minimal level of quality cost for a given level of prevention and appraisal activities, and the other asserts that through prevention quality improvement is constant. This paper summarises these positions and outlines a behaviour model of quality costs that unifies and clarifies them. The behaviour model is based on the consideration of the cumulative effects of prevention. Ceteris paribus, continuous prevention activities should permit quality improvements whilst at the same time reducing the costs necessary to obtain them. The behaviour model introduces the effect of external quality requirements in an attempt to explain how, over time, quality improvement efforts do not necessarily result in decreased quality costs as customers’ quality requirements rise over the same period.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

T.F. Burgess

Existing qualitycost models have been criticized for their imprecision and inadequate theoretical justification. Attempts to remedy these deficiencies by using systems…

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2542

Abstract

Existing qualitycost models have been criticized for their imprecision and inadequate theoretical justification. Attempts to remedy these deficiencies by using systems dynamics to build a generic model relating quality conformance levels to the qualitycost categories of prevention, appraisal and failure (PAF). Outlines in depth the assumptions underlying the model’s structure and links model parameters to published empirical data. Explores the model’s sensitivities to changes in factors including different initial values of conformance quality. Determines the potential for improvements in quarterly and cumulative quality costs by changing the PAF cost levels.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Anil K. Bajpai and Phillip C.T. Willey

The importance of quality costs and benefits is sometimes not recognised by industrial managers. Quality costs money but the benefits which accrue are elusive and hard to…

Abstract

The importance of quality costs and benefits is sometimes not recognised by industrial managers. Quality costs money but the benefits which accrue are elusive and hard to quantify. The way in which quality costs have been regarded in the past are reviewed and the old basis challenged. A new basis for recognising and exploiting quality benefits is proposed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Rune M. Moen

Measuring quality costs has been emphasized as an important part of quality improvement since the early 1950s. A chapter on quality costs seems to be almost compulsory in…

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3115

Abstract

Measuring quality costs has been emphasized as an important part of quality improvement since the early 1950s. A chapter on quality costs seems to be almost compulsory in every book pertaining to total quality management, business process improvement, and similar topics. There is no doubt that measuring quality costs is useful in order to direct improvement efforts; the problem is that the concept is not as valid today as it used to be. While customer requirements and production systems have changed considerably during the last decades, quality cost measurement is advocated in nearly the same way as it was 40 years ago. This work presents a new customer and process focused poor quality cost model that enables the provider of a product or service to focus on elements that really matter to his customers. The input to the model is customer requirements and the output is expected poor quality costs estimated through the Taguchi loss function. Quality function deployment is used to translate the voice of the customer to key process parameters, that is process parameters having a direct influence on the fulfilment of customer requirements. The quality function deployment matrix is also used to estimate intangible costs. Traditional cost categories have been altered, and the expected loss for each cost category is estimated based on actual process performance and stepwise quadratic loss functions with multiple intervals. The intended use of the model is as a top management decision‐making tool able to link quality improvement to customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Geanie W. Margavio, Ross L. Fink and Thomas M. Margavio

Quality improvement decisions are the catalyst for substantialtechnological improvements being made in the manufacturing sector. Thenew technology, however, has developed…

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2353

Abstract

Quality improvement decisions are the catalyst for substantial technological improvements being made in the manufacturing sector. The new technology, however, has developed faster than techniques for evaluating capital investments in such improvements. This is largely because the benefits of quality improvement technology are difficult to quantify. The Taguchi loss function is incorporated into a net present value capital budgeting technique to provide an estimate of these benefits. Describes the loss function in relation to key quality costs: appraisal and prevention costs, and internal and external failure costs. External failure cost savings are generated by reducing variability in the manufacturing process. These savings are then compared with the cost of the quality improving technology. Results indicate that these savings can be substantial, depending on the achieved reduction in the process variability, the cost of capital, and on the estimate of the cost of processing a customer’s return of the product.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Muhsin Halis and Ahmet Oztas

The aim of this paper is to determine the quality costs in ISO‐9000‐certified business organisations deriving from the application of the standards. In the beginning, the…

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1982

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to determine the quality costs in ISO‐9000‐certified business organisations deriving from the application of the standards. In the beginning, the quality costs in implementing ISO‐9000 are investigated. The importance of the quality cost system is emphasised. Then, a quality cost system is proposed and quality cost analysis is performed on ISO‐9000‐certified Turkish companies. To determine the quality cost data, a questionnaire was prepared and sent to the selected companies. Collected quality costs data were then analysed using a number of analysis methods.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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