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1 – 10 of 164
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Baek-Kyoo (Brian) Joo, Gil Bozer and Kathryn J. Ready

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of learning organization culture (LOC), learning goal orientation (LGO) and psychological empowerment (PsyEmp) on employee…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of learning organization culture (LOC), learning goal orientation (LGO) and psychological empowerment (PsyEmp) on employee engagement, focusing on the mediating role of each dimension of PsyEmp (meaning, competence, self-determination and impact).

Design/methodology/approach

Individual perceptions of 329 employees in 9 South Korean for-profit companies were obtained by a cross-sectional survey. Construct validity of each measurement model was examined using confirmatory factor analysis, and the hypothesized structural model was tested by structural equation modeling. Bootstrap analyses were used for testing mediation effects of PsyEmp.

Findings

The authors found that PsyEmp had a significant effect on job engagement, and that LOC and LGO significantly predicted the level of PsyEmp and engagement. The four dimensions of PsyEmp partially mediated the relationship between the two predictors (i.e. LOC and LGO) and job engagement. LGO had a stronger effect than LOC on both PsyEmp and job engagement.

Practical implications

Employees who are high in LGO and perceive that an organization provides opportunities for continuous learning with supportive leadership are more likely to experience improved meaning in their work, competence in their knowledge and skills, and foster self-determination with respect to their personal impact on their work and organization. These important facets of PsyEmp that promote employee engagement should be considered by human resource and OD professionals when recommending workplace changes to improve organizational effectiveness and sustainability.

Originality/value

This study complements the trend to use employee engagement as a proxy for understanding both individual and organizational performance by investigating the relationships among LOC, goal orientation, empowerment and engagement.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Mohammed Idress, Jamal A. Al‐Khatib, Mohammed I. Al‐Habib and Kathryn J. Ready

Job satisfaction studies have recognized gender differences in the U.S. but have failed to address job limitations and occupational segregation for females as a result of cultural…

Abstract

Job satisfaction studies have recognized gender differences in the U.S. but have failed to address job limitations and occupational segregation for females as a result of cultural and religious restrictions experienced by women in many developing countries. This study aids in bridging this gap in the job satisfaction literature by empirically investigating job satisfaction among dual‐working couples in Saudi Arabia. Despite restrictions imposed by culture and religion, our findings indicate that women in Saudi Arabia experience higher levels of job satisfaction than men in ability utilization and achievement levels.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 3 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Baek‐Kyoo (Brian) Joo and Kathryn J. Ready

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of personal characteristics (proactive personality and performance goal orientation) and contextual characteristics…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of personal characteristics (proactive personality and performance goal orientation) and contextual characteristics (organizational learning culture and leader‐member exchange quality) on employees' career satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were drawn from 232 employees in a Fortune Global 500 company in Korea. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted for measurement model assessment. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to explain the variance in career satisfaction.

Findings

As a result of correlation analysis, all the constructs were found to be significant predictors of career satisfaction. Accounting for 22 percent of the variance in career satisfaction, employees exhibited the highest career satisfaction, when they had higher performance goal orientation, and when they perceived higher learning culture and better relationship with supervisor. LMX turned out to moderate the relationship between performance goal orientation and career satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The contributions of this study to theory lie in the fact that it: took an integrative approach encompassing both personal and contextual factors; examined little researched constructs in career development, organizational learning culture and goal orientation; and was an international study, based on the Korean cultural context.

Practical implications

To support employees' career satisfaction in the Korean cultural context, the contextual factors (i.e. organizational learning culture and LMX quality) are more important than the personality factors. HR/OD practitioners can play a pivotal role in improving career satisfaction by adopting such practices as cultural change and leadership development using coaching/mentoring.

Originality/value

This paper is original in that it takes an integrative approach encompassing both personal and contextual factors, examines organizational learning culture and goal orientation, which have previously been the subject of little research, and has an international dimension, being based on the Korean cultural context.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Alfred C. Holden and Patricia A. Monter

While export‐credit insurance is traditionally utilized by exporters to protect foreign receivables, to facilitate domestic financing, or to match credit terms of competitors…

Abstract

While export‐credit insurance is traditionally utilized by exporters to protect foreign receivables, to facilitate domestic financing, or to match credit terms of competitors, there is an interesting fourth function. The exporter targeting a creditworthy foreign customer within a country undergoing a temporary economic disruption can use export‐credit insurance to provide a key addition to the foreign customer's working capital needs. This paper quantifies the working capital gains for a Mexican importer when a U.S. exporter liberalizes payment terms by using export‐credit insurance and so alleviates the importer otherwise confronting sharply higher short‐term domestic borrowing costs and a depreciating peso.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Olga Epitropaki and Charalampos Mainemelis

In the present chapter, we present the case study of the only woman film director who has ever won an Academy Award for Best Director, Kathryn Bigelow. We analyzed 43 written…

Abstract

In the present chapter, we present the case study of the only woman film director who has ever won an Academy Award for Best Director, Kathryn Bigelow. We analyzed 43 written interviews of Kathryn Bigelow that have appeared in the popular press in the period 1988–2013 and outlined eight main themes emerging regarding her exercise of leadership in the cinematic context. We utilize three theoretical frameworks: (a) paradoxical leadership theory (Lewis, Andriopoulos, & Smith, 2014; Smith & Lewis, 2012); (b) ambidextrous leadership theory (Rosing, Frese, & Bausch, 2011), and (c) role congruity theory (Eagley & Karau, 2002) and show how Bigelow, as a woman artist/leader working in a complex organizational system that emphasizes radical innovation, exercised paradoxical and ambidextrous leadership and challenged existing conventions about genre, gender, and leadership. The case study implications for teaching and practice are discussed.

Details

Leadership Lessons from Compelling Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-942-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Kathryn J. Lively

To determine how the correlational structure of emotion differs for individuals age 60 and above, compared to those under age 60, and to discuss the profound implications these…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine how the correlational structure of emotion differs for individuals age 60 and above, compared to those under age 60, and to discuss the profound implications these differences may have for the experience and management of emotion.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and shortest path analysis of emotion items from the General Social Survey (GSS)’s (1996) emotions module.

Findings

Some positive and negative emotion pairs are more distant for individuals over age 60, while others are in fact closer. This variability leads to differences in available shortest paths between emotions, especially when emotional transitions require segueing through intermediary feelings. The segueing emotions most readily available to those over 60 are limited to the poles of affective meaning, whereas those used by ones under age 60 are more variable. The majority of negative emotions are more tightly correlated, whereas the majority of positive emotions are less so, among those over age 60.

Research limitations/implications

Although the measures are limited to 18 of the 19 emotions recorded by the GSS, and are based on self-report data regarding feelings felt over a period of seven days, these results suggest that attempts at intrapersonal and interpersonal emotion management may differ depending up the age of the actor/object.

Originality/value

Addresses the need for more nuanced analyses of emotional experience that goes moves beyond simple frequencies. Also suggests potential bridges between sociological and psychological approaches to the study of emotion.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2002

Kenneth Culp and Kathryn J. Cox

Leadership educators must consider how to most effectively develop youth knowledge, skills, attitudes, aspirations and leadership abilities when facilitating leadership…

Abstract

Leadership educators must consider how to most effectively develop youth knowledge, skills, attitudes, aspirations and leadership abilities when facilitating leadership development. During the first two millennia, leadership was adult-centered, with little focus on development. To develop effective leadership programs, it is essential that leadership educators: consider the implications of societal trends; project the contexts of 21st century leadership; understand and apply the principles of effective youth leadership development; and, develop meaningful adult and adolescent partnerships to prepare youth for success in the third millennium.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Kathryn Woods

This study examined university students’ perceptions of generational issues in the workplace. Baby Boomers are retiring rapidly (their knowledge and experience retiring along with…

Abstract

This study examined university students’ perceptions of generational issues in the workplace. Baby Boomers are retiring rapidly (their knowledge and experience retiring along with them), and Millennials are now the largest generational group represented in the workforce. Students at a mid-sized university in the southeast region of the United States, majoring in Leadership or attending a leadership skills development workshop, were surveyed to determine their views on challenges and opportunities that exist due to the current generational landscape of the workforce. Results of the study indicated that reconciling various perspectives was both the top challenge and benefit when working with members of other generations, and that opportunities for reciprocal mentorship were valued by members of each generation surveyed. Recommendations for leadership educators and future researchers are provided.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Premaratne Samaranayake, Ann Dadich, Anneke Fitzgerald and Kathryn Zeitz

The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt through the development of an evaluation framework for a clinical redesign programme – the aim of which was to improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt through the development of an evaluation framework for a clinical redesign programme – the aim of which was to improve the patient journey through improved discharge practices within an Australian public hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the evaluation framework involved three stages – namely, the analysis of secondary data relating to the discharge planning pathway; the analysis of primary data including field-notes and interview transcripts on hospital processes; and the triangulation of these data sets to devise the framework. The evaluation framework ensured that resource use, process management, patient satisfaction, and staff well-being and productivity were each connected with measures, targets, and the aim of clinical redesign programme.

Findings

The application of business process management and a balanced scorecard enabled a different way of framing the evaluation, ensuring measurable outcomes were connected to inputs and outputs. Lessons learnt include: first, the importance of mixed-methods research to devise the framework and evaluate the redesigned processes; second, the need for appropriate tools and resources to adequately capture change across the different domains of the redesign programme; and third, the value of developing and applying an evaluative framework progressively.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation framework is limited by its retrospective application to a clinical process redesign programme.

Originality/value

This research supports benchmarking with national and international practices in relation to best practice healthcare redesign processes. Additionally, it provides a theoretical contribution on evaluating health services improvement and redesign initiatives.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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