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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Kate V. Morland, Dermot Breslin and Fionn Stevenson

This paper aims to examine multiple learning cycles across a UK housebuilder organization following changes made to their quality management routine at the organizational level…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine multiple learning cycles across a UK housebuilder organization following changes made to their quality management routine at the organizational level, through to subsequent understanding and enactment at the level of the individuals involved.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative case study methodology based on an analysis of six-weeks of participant observation, semi-structured ethnographic interviews and documentation within three of the organization’s regional offices. Through an abductive process, it draws on gathered data and extant literature to develop a multi-level learning model.

Findings

Four levels of learning cycles are observed within the model: individual, team (within which inter-organizational relationships nest), region and organization. Three inter-related factors are identified as influencing feed-forward and feedback across the levels: time, communication and trust. The impact of these levels and factors on the process of learning is conceptualized through the metaphor of coupling and decoupling and discussed using examples from housing development projects.

Originality/value

While previous models of organizational learning highlight important multi-level interaction effects, they do not explore how the different levels of learning synchronize over time for learning to move between them. This paper addresses this gap by shedding important light on how layers of learning synchronize and why and when this can occur within multi-level organizations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Norah Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ways in which Derridean deconstruction can be used for image research.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ways in which Derridean deconstruction can be used for image research.

Design/methodology/approach

Derridean concepts, mainly located in literary criticism, are adapted to image research.

Findings

The paper presents four concepts of visual deconstruction: logocentric vision; close reading images; seeing the Other; and problematising not solutionising the image.

Research limitations/implications

Many more aspects of Derridean deconstruction can be related to the economy of the image.

Originality/value

Little work to date in management studies has considered how Derridean deconstruction can be used to investigate images.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Robert van Krieken

This chapter examines the differing ways in which the criminal responsibility of children has been understood in English and Australian common law. The doctrine of “doli incapax”…

Abstract

This chapter examines the differing ways in which the criminal responsibility of children has been understood in English and Australian common law. The doctrine of “doli incapax” has for many centuries worked to establish a presumption in law that children between the ages of around 10 and 14 are incapable of forming criminal intent, unless it can be shown that they are capable of ‘guilty knowledge’ about their actions. In this approach, children are presumed to be ‘naughty’ until it can be shown that they are ‘bad’. However, events such as the murder of James Bulger in 1993 have led to the abolition of the doctrine in the UK, and its questioning in Australia. The chapter will outline how and why the law’s distinction between adults and children in relation to crime has become unstable, and explain the implications of the legal conception of childhood for the sociology of childhood more broadly. It will also explore how a closer look at the history of the doli incapax presumption sheds considerable light on the central and active role played by the judiciary and the legal profession, as opposed to other social and professional groups, in the development of a particular legal construction of childhood.

Details

Victim, Perpetrator, or What Else?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-335-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Hélène de Burgh‐Woodman and Jan Brace‐Govan

The purpose is to investigate the concepts of subculture, subculture of consumption and brand community with a view to better understanding these three groups and their distinct…

9411

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to investigate the concepts of subculture, subculture of consumption and brand community with a view to better understanding these three groups and their distinct differences.

Design/methodology/approach

The method relies on a literature review and a case study of sporting subculture. Using commentary from the surfing community as an example of subcultural groups we see how they define themselves against consumption oriented groups.

Findings

Subcultures are completely different from brand communities (or subcultures of consumption) and while they can be said to share certain common traits the broad philosophical foci of these two groups are vastly incommensurate with one another.

Practical implications

Marketing discourse has perpetually conflated subculture with forms of consumption, i.e. brand communities, yet they are different. By acknowledging and interrogating the key differences marketers may better apprehend the needs, character and activities of subcultural participants and market more strategically.

Originality/value

By dissecting the differences between subculture, subculture of consumption and brand community, this paper offers a re‐conceptualisation of these terms in marketing discourse. In doing so, this paper seeks to dispel some fundamental misapprehensions in marketing and offer an entirely fresh perspective on the value and meaning of subculture.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1946

THE Librarian faces one of the turning times in library history. The flow of progress has not yet begun, the shortages and consequent imperious demands for food, housing and…

Abstract

THE Librarian faces one of the turning times in library history. The flow of progress has not yet begun, the shortages and consequent imperious demands for food, housing and clothing stand in the way of the beginning, except on paper. How long the interregnum will last none can say. The authorities, which are a reflection in some ways of the Parliamentary party in power, are well‐disposed towards libraries; the official handbook of the Labour Party proves that; but the clamour of the needs we have mentioned deafens everybody to library needs—except in certain instances. For example, the rebuilding and enlarging of the staff at Holborn is an encouraging sign. Of more potential significance is the working out of the so‐called National Charter. It has involved many towns in the task of creating an establishment for each public department. Thus, in one library system we hear that each branch or department may claim a librarian and a deputy both on the A.P.T. scale, but all the assistants are either general or clerical. Some assistants we hear have applied to be of clerical grade as the maximum salary is greater than in the general. This we suggest is putting cash before status because it is accepted as an axiom that a clerk has only clerical qualifications and potentialities, while a general assistant may aspire, when there is a vacancy and if he have certificates, to the professional status. The grading in the particular library mentioned has rather a petrifying effect in that no assistant can get into the professional grade unless his librarian or deputy departs. Possibly this sort of thing may alter, but the fact remains for good or ill—it is not all ill by any means—that no library is able to attract men from another except to a definitely higher post.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1963

Even those most skilled in the art of diagnosis occasionally need to be reminded that common things occur most commonly; it saves them chasing obscure signs to uncommon…

Abstract

Even those most skilled in the art of diagnosis occasionally need to be reminded that common things occur most commonly; it saves them chasing obscure signs to uncommon conclusions. Having spent several uncomfortable days in snuffling and snivelling, sneezing, streaming; sequestered with the piles of wet handkerchiefs mounting, with which we believe we have developed entirely novel and hitherto untried methods of nose‐drying; in all this, we felt the urge to write a little to those who search for uncommon things in food about that commonest of all common things—the common cold! This may not be so important after all, as there has at last been developed satisfactory culture‐techniques for the common cold viruses and cold vaccines are now distinctly probable, so that for generations unborn, the common cold may become an uncommon infection. Who knows?

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Karen Daly, Emer Isdell, Leona Moynihan, Kate O'Callaghan, Sonia O'Leary, Andrea Pepper and Yvonne Pennisi

The COVID-19 pandemic transformed the delivery of occupational therapy (OT) community mental health services nationally, resulting in the rapid expansion and delivery of services…

1503

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic transformed the delivery of occupational therapy (OT) community mental health services nationally, resulting in the rapid expansion and delivery of services through telehealth. While telehealth technology and its use are not new, widespread adoption was precipitated by the cessation of face-to-face services due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Research in this field has been conducted previously; however, it is not specific to OT in the Irish context. This study aims to explore service users’ experience of telehealth OT interventions in adult mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive qualitative approach was used to explore service users’ experience of mental health telehealth OT services. Five service users were recruited to participate in a focus group to explore their experience of OT via telehealth. The themes identified from this focus group were then further explored via individual interviews. Four of the service users who participated in the focus group chose to complete in-depth interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis was then completed.

Findings

Two key themes emerged from the data. The theme of positive telehealth experiences included subthemes of gratitude for the option of telehealth and accessibility. The second theme of learning from experience, included subthemes of human connection, preferred platforms of telehealth methods and future considerations for telehealth interventions.

Originality/value

These findings provide a unique insight into the importance of continuing OT services via telehealth, from the service users’ perspective.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

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