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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Kate V. Lewis

The aim of this paper is to focus on the meaning of entrepreneurial work for young female entrepreneurs. Specific domains of exploratory emphasis are: the link between the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to focus on the meaning of entrepreneurial work for young female entrepreneurs. Specific domains of exploratory emphasis are: the link between the individual and the business; the entwinement of self-esteem and business outcomes; and the language of attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

Four longitudinal case studies using multiple in-depth, phenomenologically oriented interviews inform the paper.

Findings

The nature of the relationship between the entrepreneurs and their work was intense and all-encompassing. Further, this sample overlaid their stories with an emotional dimension that was inseparable from the narratives of “business life” and openly advocated this emotional way of working.

Originality value

Coverage of age and gender in relation to entrepreneurship is virtually non-existent.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Colette Henry, Lene Foss and Kate V. Lewis

568

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Sue Cassells and Kate V. Lewis

Micro and small enterprises face growing expectations from stakeholders to behave responsibly in respect of environmental management. However, many continue to exhibit patterns of…

Abstract

Purpose

Micro and small enterprises face growing expectations from stakeholders to behave responsibly in respect of environmental management. However, many continue to exhibit patterns of relative disengagement with both environmental management and associated training. The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes and experiences that underpin both.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on survey data from 148 owner-managers of micro and small firms in New Zealand’s manufacturing sector. Binary logit regression and non-parametric testing were employed to examine influences on engagement with both environmental management and environmental training.

Findings

There is a lack of knowledge of, and participation in, training related to environmental management. Awareness tends to be from firms already engaged in training; signalling a potential circularity of exposure effect. A distinct division in attitude exists between those who identify with personal responsibility and autonomy as the pathway to responsibility in respect of their firm’s environmental impact and those who cede to the collective actions of other communities to dictate engagement (i.e. industry associations and government).

Research limitations/implications

The survey is based on the perceptions of the respondents to the survey statements and as such it is a self-assessment.

Originality/value

The paper is one of few that investigate the challenge of securing engagement with training and development in environmental management by micro and small enterprises in the New Zealand context.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Kate V. Lewis, Marcus Ho, Candice Harris and Rachel Morrison

This paper aims to report an empirically grounded theoretical framework within which to understand the role of entrepreneurial identity development in the discovery, development…

2253

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report an empirically grounded theoretical framework within which to understand the role of entrepreneurial identity development in the discovery, development and exploitation of opportunity, and to elaborate on how these identity transitions both mobilise and constrain female entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study-based research design was used in this study. Primary and secondary data were collected from eight female participants (all of whom can be categorised as “mumpreneurs”) and analysed to inform the theoretical framework that is the foundation of the paper.

Findings

The authors describe how identity conflict, role congruence and reciprocal identity creation play a critical role in venture creation as a form of entrepreneurship. Drawing on the constructs of identification, self-verification and identity enactment, the authors build a theoretical framework for understanding entrepreneurial identity transitions in relation to opportunity-seeking behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

The work is theoretical in character and based on a sample that, whilst rich in the provision of theoretical insight, is small in scope. Additionally, the sample is located in one geographical context (New Zealand) which likely has implications for the way in which the key constructs are perceived and enacted.

Originality/value

This paper is an attempt to integrate conceptualisations of entrepreneurial identity development with opportunity-related processes in the context of venture creation. A holistic focus on identity transitions and their relevance to perception and action in relation to opportunity (the root of entrepreneurial behaviour) is novel; at this point, it is exploratory in intention and tentative in reach.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2013

Kate V. Lewis and Elizabeth A. Walker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the self‐employment experiences of a group of “third age entrepreneurs” from a business assistance perspective. As well as examining what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the self‐employment experiences of a group of “third age entrepreneurs” from a business assistance perspective. As well as examining what sources of business assistance are utilised, and what influences such decisions, methods of access and perceived impact are also considered – as are the reasons for non‐use.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on data from in‐depth interviews with 14 individuals who entered self‐employment when they were 50 years of age or older.

Findings

The findings from the interviews suggest that there is limited engagement by these older entrepreneurs with the business support infrastructure. Interactions tend to be with a limited number of trusted professionals with whom relationships are already established. There is a lack of demand for initiatives, targeted or otherwise, and a desire to remain independent and self‐reliant.

Research limitations/implications

The paper reports on a small‐scale qualitative study, and therefore the results are not generalisable.

Originality/value

The paper make a contribution to the small, but critical, knowledge base focused on better understanding third age entrepreneurship. Specifically, it is one of few studies to explore the phenomenon from a support infrastructure perspective.

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Sue Cassells, Kate V. Lewis and Alec Findlater

New Zealand firms display reluctance in embracing the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) standard. The low adoption rate suggests that the benefits of doing so are…

1018

Abstract

Purpose

New Zealand firms display reluctance in embracing the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) standard. The low adoption rate suggests that the benefits of doing so are not adequately understood by New Zealand firms. The purpose of the paper is to report success factors for the implementation of ISO 14001, as well as the barriers to, and benefits of, adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on data from a survey of all ISO 14001 certified firms in New Zealand.

Findings

The key factors reported as being critical to the successful implementation of an ISO 14001 driven EMS for the respondent firms are planning and strategy, and capability building, with process management of lesser importance. Factors recognised as potential barriers to successful ISO 14001 adoption are primarily implementation processes and costs, with external engagement, information and infrastructure, and contractor commitments deemed lesser barriers. Perceived benefits of ISO 14001 adoption are reported as environmental operating performance, compliance related performance, environmental outcomes and perceptions and, lastly, competitive orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to data from externally certified firms (i.e. it excludes any data from firms who “self‐declare”). The data are also post‐implementation (i.e. there is no measurement of whether the reported benefits, barriers and success factors were what the firm had expected pre‐implementation).

Originality/value

The paper is one of few that explore the phenomenon of ISO 14001 adoption by firms in the New Zealand context.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 54 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Kate V. Lewis, Candice Harris, Rachel Morrison and Marcus Ho

The purpose of this paper is to use boundaryless career theory as a perspective from which to explore understanding related to the interplay between life-stage and career…

1916

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use boundaryless career theory as a perspective from which to explore understanding related to the interplay between life-stage and career transitions in women; and, specifically, the life-stage-related event of motherhood relative to the transition from corporate employment to self-employment.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative longitudinal research design was operationalized over a four-year period and data from both primary and secondary sources were collected in relation to four New Zealand case studies.

Findings

The findings highlight how life-stage events such as motherhood can have a profound influence on both the perception and enactment of careers and career transitions. In total, two primary micro-processes were identified in relation to the career transitions of the female participants into self-employment and were labeled “traditional employment” (relating to role change; integrating work and life domains; opportunity seeking; and support) and “creating boundaries” (relating to: compartmentalization of responsibility, life-stage events, work models, and business growth and success).

Research limitations/implications

Exploratory in nature; small in scale; limited to one geographic context.

Originality/value

The authors attempt to add a more nuanced understanding of the notion of boundaryless careers in relation to entrepreneurship generally and the transition of a group of women into self-employment specifically. Both the discourse and pragmatics of boundaries between work/life and past careers/new careers is more salient in terms of success than possibly historically understood in this domain, and the enactment of boundaries richer and more diverse than theory may currently account for.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Candida G. Brush, Patricia G. Greene and Friederike Welter

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief history of the evolution of the Diana Project and the Diana International Research Conference. The authors examine the impact of…

1621

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief history of the evolution of the Diana Project and the Diana International Research Conference. The authors examine the impact of the publications, conferences and research contributions and consider key factors in the success of this collaborative research organization. They discuss the ongoing legacy, suggesting ways to extend this into the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an historical narrative and a citation analysis.

Findings

The Diana Project was founded by five women professors in 1999 with the purpose of investigating women’s access to growth capital. Following a series of academic articles, and numerous presentations, the first Diana International Conference was held in Stockholm, Sweden. At this convening, 20 scholars from 13 countries shared their knowledge of women’s entrepreneurship, venture creation and growth, culminating in the first volume of the Diana Book Series. Since then, 14 international conferences have been held, resulting in 10 special issues of top academic journals and 11 books. More than 600 scholars have attended or participated in Diana conferences or publications.

Research limitations/implications

Contributions from the Diana International Conferences’ special issues of journals and books have advanced theory across topics, levels, geographies and methods. Articles emerging from Diana scholars are some of the top contributions about women’s entrepreneurship and gender to the field of entrepreneurship. Future research directions are included.

Practical implications

This analysis demonstrates the success of a unique woman-focused collaborative research initiative and identifies key success factors, suggesting how these might be expanded in the future.

Social implications

To date, more than 600 scholars have participated in the Diana International Conferences or publications. Diana is the only community dedicated to rigorous and relevant research about gender and women’s entrepreneurship. Going forward, efforts to expand work on education for women’s entrepreneurship, women entrepreneurship faculty and careers, and women entrepreneurs, gender and policy will take place to extend this legacy.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in that it is the first to show the substantial legacy and impact of the Diana project since its inception in 1999. Further, it demonstrates how a feminist approach to entrepreneurial principles can yield insights about this unique research initiative and collaborative organization.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2014

Julianne C. Turner

I address the question, Is theory useful when collaborating with teachers to improve student engagement?

Abstract

Purpose

I address the question, Is theory useful when collaborating with teachers to improve student engagement?

Design/methodology

We based our work on four principles of motivation drawn from the research literature: students are more likely to engage in learning if teachers support their perceptions of competence, autonomy, belongingness, and make learning meaningful. To bridge the gap between theory and practice, we suggested that teachers use certain instructional strategies, like open-ended questions, related to supporting student engagement. These strategies were both more complex than the standard practices and more challenging to implement, given the current U.S. emphasis on standardized testing. In two longitudinal studies, we provided rationales for engagement principles and instructional strategies related to student engagement and encouraged teachers to use new practices. Mixed methodology included online observation measures and video of classroom instruction, retrospective interviews with teachers, and student interviews and experience sampling self-reports.

Findings

Short case studies of teachers change illustrate the examples of implementation. In both studies, about half the teachers made significant instructional changes, which were related both to teacher perceptions of student engagement and to student self-reports.

Originality/value

Insights gained from the studies may offer researchers practical information about how to work with teachers to improve engagement in the classroom. They include whether teachers can understand abstract motivation terminology, consider students’ “basic needs” when planning instruction, and implement strategies so that they are likely to support student engagement. Other learnings include the strong impact of teacher culture on change efforts and the need to consider teachers’ “basic needs” if we are to support them in instructional change. Long-term collaboration and establishing mutual trust may be the best way for both researchers and teachers to develop common understandings for supporting student motivation in the classroom.

Details

Motivational Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-555-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Hannah Kate Lewis and Una Foye

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However, evidence on how…

Abstract

Purpose

The current policy landscape advocates for the involvement of people with lived experience in the co-production and co-delivery of mental health services. However, evidence on how to do this safely and effectively for people with eating disorders (EDs) is lacking. The purpose of this study was to explore and synthesis the implementation of ED interventions which involved lived-experience and to evaluate the associated benefits and risks to participants.

Design/methodology/approach

This study will conduct a systematic review of ED interventions which involve people with lived experience of an ED. A total of seven databases and four subject-specific journals were searched using Boolean search terms.

Findings

The search yielded ten eligible studies. Involvement procedures were extracted which highlighted variation with some roles being continuous and active and others being isolated and passive. Qualitative results were extracted and thematically analysed which demonstrated many benefits from involving people with lived experience, such as normalisation of experiences, inspiration to recover and the sharing of insight, as well as some risks such as disingenuity and exposure to triggering content.

Practical implications

The implications of this review highlight the need for policy and guidance to minimise variation across procedures and implementation of co-production to ensure positive outcomes and benefits for participants, given the current landscape. More research in the benefits and risks for those involved in the delivery of the interventions is needed to ensure that co-production and peer support is delivered as safely and effectively as possible.

Originality/value

This was the first systematic review since 2016 (Fogarty et al., 2016) to assess peer-mentorship programmes in ED treatments, whilst expanding the remit to include wider definitions of peer-support and peer-mentorships such as co-production and co-design in research.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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