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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Fiona Aspinal, Martin Stevens, Jill Manthorpe, John Woolham, Kritika Samsi, Kate Baxter, Shereen Hussein and Mohamed Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from one element of a study exploring the relationship between personalisation, in the form of personal budgets (PBs) for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from one element of a study exploring the relationship between personalisation, in the form of personal budgets (PBs) for publicly funded social care and safeguarding.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 people receiving PBs who had recently been the focus of a safeguarding investigation. Participants were recruited from two English local authority areas and data were subject to thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis identified three main themes: levels of information and awareness; safeguarding concerns and processes; and choice and control. Many of the participants in this small study described having experienced multiple forms of abuse or neglect concurrently or repeatedly over time.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small scale, qualitative study, taking place in two local authorities. The small number of participants may have had strong opinions which may or may not have been typical. However, the study provides some rich data on people’s experiences.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that adults receiving PBs may need information on an ongoing and repeated basis together with advice on how to identify and address poor quality care that they are arranging for themselves. Practitioners need to be aware of the influence of the level of information received and the interaction of organisational or legal requirements when responding to safeguarding concerns when care being supplied tries to reflect the benefits of choice and control.

Originality/value

This paper reports original research asking adults with care and support needs about the interaction between two key policies of safeguarding and personalisation.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Kate Baxter, Marjorie Weiss and Julian Le Grand

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the inter‐ and intra‐organisational relationships in the commissioning of secondary care by primary care trusts in England…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the inter‐ and intra‐organisational relationships in the commissioning of secondary care by primary care trusts in England, using a principal‐agent framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a qualitative study of three case studies. A total of 13 commissioning‐related meetings were observed. In total, 21 managers and six consultant surgeons were interviewed.

Findings

There are a number of different levels at which contractual and managerial control take place. Different strengths of control at one level can affect willingness to comply with agreements at other levels. Agreements at one level do not necessarily result in appropriate or expected action at another.

Research limitations/implications

The system for commissioning in the National Health Service (NHS) has changed with the introduction of payment by results and practice‐based commissioning. However, the dynamics of the inter‐ and intra‐organisational relationships studied remain.

Practical implications

Incentives within organisations are as important as those between organisations. Within a chain of principal‐agent relations, it is important that a strong link in the chain does not result in the exploitation of weaknesses in other links. If government targets and frameworks are to be met through commissioning, it may be advantageous to concentrate efforts on developing incentives that align clinician with NHS trust objectives as well as NHS trust with primary care trust (PCT) and government objectives.

Originality/value

This paper is based on original empirical work. It uses a principal‐agent framework to understand the relationships between PCTs and NHS trusts and highlights the importance of internal NHS trust governance systems in the fulfilment of commissioning agreements.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jill Manthorpe, Martin Stevens, Kritika Samsi, Fiona Aspinal, John Woolham, Shereen Hussein, Mohamed Ismail and Kate Baxter

The purpose of this paper is to report on a part of a study examining the interrelationships between personalisation and safeguarding practice. Specifically the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a part of a study examining the interrelationships between personalisation and safeguarding practice. Specifically the authors aimed to examine how safeguarding practice is affected by the roll out of personalisation in adult social care, particularly when the adult at risk has a personal budget or is considering this.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of annual reports from Adult Safeguarding Boards in England was accessed for content analysis covering the period 2009-2011. One part of this sample of local authorities was selected at random; the other authorities selected had been early adopters of personalisation. The reports were analysed using a pro forma to collect salient information on personalisation that was cross-referenced to identify common themes and differences.

Findings

The authors found variable mentions of personalisation as part of the macro policy context reported in the annual reviews, some examples of system or process changes at mezzo level where opportunities to discuss the interface were emerging, and some small reports of training and case accounts relevant to personalisation. Overall these two policy priorities seemed to be more closely related than had been found in earlier research on the interface between adult safeguarding and personalisation.

Research limitations/implications

There was wide variation in the annual reports in terms of detail, size and content, and reports for only one year were collected. Developments may have taken place but might not have been recorded in the annual reports so these should not be relied upon as complete accounts of organisational or practice developments.

Practical implications

Authors of Safeguarding Adults Board reports may benefit from learning that their reports may be read both immediately and potentially in the future. They may wish to ensure their comments on current matters will be intelligible to possible future readers and researchers.

Originality/value

There does not appear to have been any other previous study of Safeguarding Adult Boards’ annual reports. Documentary analysis at local level is under-developed in safeguarding studies.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Brenda Leese, Kate Baxter, Nick Goodwin, Judith Scott and Ann Mahon

Primary care in the UK has been the subject of numerous changes and reorganizations since 1990. Each innovation in organization, with the exception of fundholding, has…

439

Abstract

Primary care in the UK has been the subject of numerous changes and reorganizations since 1990. Each innovation in organization, with the exception of fundholding, has been the subject of evaluation. However, the complexities of some innovations make the evaluation process problematic and this is further complicated by the trend towards central policy decision making being subject to local interpretation and implementation, by means of simultaneous devolution and centralization. This paper discusses the challenges and problems posed by attempting to evaluate these new organizations, particularly with regard to whether or not they can be considered to be “successful”. It draws specifically on the national evaluation of the total purchasing pilots and indicates how the findings can be applied to primary care groups.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Nicola Headlam

As a network analyst, I am fascinated by social interactions. The ways in which people connect with one another and exercise power and authority by deploying different…

Abstract

As a network analyst, I am fascinated by social interactions. The ways in which people connect with one another and exercise power and authority by deploying different forms of capital. This piece returns to the underlying and changing kinship network structure of the village of Ambridge over time, explores the role of ‘kin-keeping’ as deployed by the matriarchs Peggy and Jill. I am most interested in the ways in which gender as performed by the women of the village intersects with abundance or lack of other forms of capital, and how far inequalities persist and why. It is clear that there is an intergenerational power dynamic at play in the spreading or hoarding of the various dimensions of power layered together and how forms of capital intersect for protection or precarity. Social and cultural capital at birth in the village is defining in terms of both ‘serious’ life outcomes as well as how more minor infractions and foibles are viewed. Further, I return to discuss how my various network-based predictions have fared over time. The Headlam Hypothesis and the fate of Ed Grundy – King of Ambridge are revisited and their durability explored.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Katie Swart, Reem Muharib, Kristi Godfrey-Hurrell, Mark M. D’Amico, Bob Algozzine, Vivian Correa and Kate Algozzine

This paper aims to survey and interview parents of young children with disabilities to document their perspectives on what professionals working with their children need…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to survey and interview parents of young children with disabilities to document their perspectives on what professionals working with their children need to know. Rather than comparing opinions over time or as part of an outcome study, this paper met with participants at a single point in time for a conversation addressing two questions with implications for training, program development and continuing research, namely, to what extent do families believe the Advancing Community College Efforts in Paraprofessional Training (ACCEPT) standards and topics are important to include in educational programs preparing professionals to work with young children with disabilities in inclusive settings (survey)? How satisfied or dissatisfied are families with the practices of early childhood educators working with their children with disabilities in inclusive and other settings (focus group)? What knowledge and skills do families recommend are important for the preparation of early childhood educators working with children with disabilities in inclusive and other settings (focus group)?

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory design was used to gather information for use in future research and program development and research efforts. Descriptive statistics were compiled for the survey data and focus group interviews were content-analyzed for themes consistent with the project’s eight standards and topics.

Findings

Analyzes of survey and focus group interview data indicated that parents/caregivers held consistent views about information and skills needed to prepare teachers and others to work with children with disabilities in inclusive settings. Parents/caregivers were asked to complete a brief survey prioritizing the importance of the eight ACCEPT standards and topics when preparing early childhood educators for working with children with disabilities in inclusive settings. They all (n =21) rated each standard and topic as “very important” (4) and provided 184 comments during follow-up interviews that represented positive examples, negative examples and recommendations distributed across the eight focusing standards.

Originality/value

This research identified the need for educators to understand the high value and importance of communication with parents of children with disabilities. This study further suggests the need for teachers to value each child’s individual needs and differences for their relationships with children and families to thrive.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Rebecca Schiff, Bernie Pauly, Shana Hall, Kate Vallance, Andrew Ivsins, Meaghan Brown, Erin Gray, Bonnie Krysowaty and Joshua Evans

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, Managed Alcohol Programs (MAPs have emerged as an alcohol harm reduction model for those living with severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) and experiencing homelessness. There is still a lack of clarity about the role of these programs in relation to Housing First (HF) discourse. The authors examine the role of MAPs within a policy environment that has become dominated by a focus on HF approaches to addressing homelessness. This examination includes a focus on Canadian policy contexts where MAPs originated and are still predominately located. The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of MAPs as a novel response to homelessness among people experiencing severe AUD and to describe the place of MAPs within a HF context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper outlines the development of discourses related to persons experiencing severe AUD and homelessness, with a focus on HF and MAPs as responses to these challenges. The authors compare the key characteristics of MAPs with “core principles” and values as outlined in various definitions of HF.

Findings

MAPs incorporate many of the core values or principles of HF as outlined in some definitions, although not all. MAPs (and other housing/treatment models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might not fit well with or who might not prefer HF models.

Originality/value

The “silver bullet” discourse surrounding HF (and harm reduction) can obscure the importance of programs (such as MAPs) that do not fully align with all HF principles and program models. This is despite the fact that MAPs (and other models) provide critical housing and support services for populations who might fall between the cracks of HF models. There is the potential for MAPs to help fill a gap in the application of harm reduction in HF programs. The authors also suggest a need to move beyond HF discourse, to embrace complexity and move toward examining what mixture of different housing and harm reduction supports are needed to provide a complete or comprehensive array of services and supports for people who use substances and are experiencing homelessness.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Kate Hamblin

Technology enabled care (TEC) equipment has been a part of adult social care (ASC) in most areas of the UK for decades. More recently, commissioners have been exploring…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology enabled care (TEC) equipment has been a part of adult social care (ASC) in most areas of the UK for decades. More recently, commissioners have been exploring mainstream technologies’ potential to support older people living in the community. The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges and opportunities presented by the growing application of mainstream technologies in ASC against the backdrop of the planned UK-wide switchover from analogue to digital telecommunications by 2025.

Design/methodology/approach

This general review uses research evidence, literature, industry standards and policy documents to address the challenges presented by the UK’s digital switchover and the potential role of mainstream technologies such as “smart speakers” in ASC.

Findings

The use of digital TEC and mainstream devices in ASC brings challenges related to access to reliable internet connections in parts of the UK; the need to update TEC safety standards; the ethics, privacy and data security measures that ensure digital products and services safeguard the interests of users; and evidence and commissioning practice.

Originality/value

This general review explores emerging areas of policy and research related to the planned UK digital switchover and the use of mainstream technologies in ASC. It offers a conceptual approach and suggests ways forward for research, regulatory and commissioning agendas.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Mike O'Donnell

Abstract

Details

Crises and Popular Dissent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-362-5

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