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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Reijo Savolainen

To elaborate the nature of critique presented in the models and concepts of human information behaviour (HIB) research by identifying the issues to which the critique is directed…

2182

Abstract

Purpose

To elaborate the nature of critique presented in the models and concepts of human information behaviour (HIB) research by identifying the issues to which the critique is directed and the ways in which the critique is conducted.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis focusing on 58 key studies on the topic. First, the objects and ways of conducting the critique were identified. Thereafter, three levels of depth at which the critique is conducted were specified. The conceptual analysis is based on the comparison of the similarities and differences between the articulations of critique presented at these levels.

Findings

At the lowest level of depth, critique of HIB research is directed to the lack of research by identifying gaps and complaining the neglect or paucity of studies in a significant domain. At the level of critiquing the shortcomings of existing studies, the attention is focused on the identification and analysis of the inadequacies of concepts and models. Finally, constructive critiques of research approaches dig deeper in that they not only identify weaknesses of existing studies but also propose alternative in which the shortcomings can be avoided, and the conceptualizations of HIB enhanced.

Research limitations/implications

As the study focuses on critiques addressed to HIB models and concepts, the findings cannot be generalized to concern the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) as a whole. Moreover, due to the emphasis of the qualitative research approach, the findings offer only an indicative picture of the frequency of the objects critiqued in HIB research.

Originality/value

The study pioneers by providing an in-depth analysis of the nature of critiques presented in a LIS research domain.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Jack Carlsen, Tommy D. Andersson, Jane Ali‐Knight, Kari Jaeger and Ruth Taylor

The paper seeks to examine the concepts, types and implications of festival innovation and failure.

15250

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the concepts, types and implications of festival innovation and failure.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of extant literature is undertaken and examples of innovation and failure in three festivals are used to demonstrate the simultaneity and co‐dependency of innovation and failure in the process of festival management.

Findings

It is apparent that many forms of program, market, service, organisational and financial innovation are available to festival managers. Many involve risk of failure due to the resource dependency theory postulated in the literature, as well as more pragmatic reasons including bad weather and managerial incompetence.

Practical  implications

Festival managers responses to the dual challenges of embracing innovation and avoiding failure will determine the future of festivals, so it is vital that knowledge is developed.

Originality/value

There is limited literature on festival management innovation and failure and limited information available to festival managers regarding the nature of festivals that facilitate innovation or failure. This paper makes an original contribution to these important issues in festival management.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Leo Jago and Jack Carlsen

347

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

854

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinström

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response to the…

Abstract

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response to the need by early humans to benefit from information that could not be immediately accessible in the nearby environment or obtained through communication. Humans developed an information behaviour ability, including processes of information sense making, foraging, seeking, organising and using. Information behaviour brought several benefits to early humans, including greater influence and control over their environment, and the degree in which they could use the environment for their own gain and survival. Information behaviour thus brought several advantages for the survival of early humans, and consequently emerged as a genetically favoured trait (Spink, 2010).

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

David Bawden is professor of information science at City University London, UK. He has a first degree in organic chemistry (Liverpool University) and masters and doctoral degrees…

Abstract

David Bawden is professor of information science at City University London, UK. He has a first degree in organic chemistry (Liverpool University) and masters and doctoral degrees in information science (Sheffield University). He worked in research information services in the pharmaceutical industry before joining City University in 1990. His academic interests include the history and philosophy of the information sciences, information-related behaviour, knowledge organisation, scientific information, digital literacy and academic-practitioner research collaboration. He is editor of the Journal of Documentation, the leading European journal of library/information science, and is a member of the board of EUCLID, the European Association for Library and Information Teaching and Research. His interests in individual differences in information behaviour stem from studies of ‘information for creativity’ in the 1980s, and he has a particularly interest in ways of understanding individual attitudes and preferences as a way of improving information provision. His email address is db@soi.city.ac.uk.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2023

Lisa M. Given, Donald O. Case and Rebekah Willson

Abstract

Details

Looking for Information
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-424-6

Abstract

Details

Looking for Information
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-424-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2017

Abstract

Details

Rural and Small Public Libraries: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-112-6

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