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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Susanna Böling, Johan M. Berlin, Helene Berglund and Joakim Öhlén

Considering the great need for palliative care in hospitals, it is essential for hospital staff to have palliative care knowledge. Palliative consultations have been shown to have…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the great need for palliative care in hospitals, it is essential for hospital staff to have palliative care knowledge. Palliative consultations have been shown to have positive effects on in-hospital care. However, barriers to contact with and uptake of palliative consultation advice are reported, posing a need for further knowledge about the process of palliative consultations. The purpose of this study therefore was to examine how palliative consultations in hospitals are practised, as perceived by consultants and health care professionals on receiving wards.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups with palliative care consultation services, health care personnel from receiving wards and managers of consultation services. Interpretive description and constant comparative method guided the analysis.

Findings

Variations were seen in several aspects of practice, including approach to practice and represented professions. The palliative consultants were perceived to contribute by creating space for palliative care, adding palliative knowledge and approach, enhancing cooperation and creating opportunity to ameliorate transition. Based on a perception of carrying valuable perspectives and knowledge, a number of consultation services utilised proactive practices that took the initiative in relation to the receiving wards.

Originality/value

A lack of policy and divergent views on how to conceptualise palliative care appeared to be associated with variations in consultation practices, tentative approaches and a bottom-up driven development. This study adds knowledge, implying theoretical transferability as to how palliative care consultations can be practised, which is useful when designing and starting new consultation services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Johan M. Berlin

The purpose of this paper was to study how psychiatric doctors practise leadership in multidisciplinary healthcare teams. The paper seeks to answer the question: How do…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to study how psychiatric doctors practise leadership in multidisciplinary healthcare teams. The paper seeks to answer the question: How do psychiatric doctors lead multidisciplinary teams during treatment conferences?

Design/methodology/approach

Six psychiatric teams were studied at a university hospital. Each team was observed over a period of 18 months, and data were collected during four years (2008-2011). Data were collected through interviews with doctors (n = 19) and observations (n = 30) of doctors’ work in multidisciplinary psychiatric teams.

Findings

Doctors in a multidisciplinary team use either self-imposed or involuntary leadership style. Oscillating between these two extremes was a strategy for handling the internal tensions of the team.

Research limitations/implications

The study was a case study, performed during treatment conferences at psychiatric wards in a university hospital. This limitation means that there is cause for some caution in generalising the results.

Practical implications

The results are useful for understanding leadership in multidisciplinary medical teams. By understanding the reversible logic of leadership, cooperation and knowledge sharing can be gained, which means that a situation of mere peaceful coexistence can be avoided. Understanding the importance of the informal contract makes it possible to switch leadership among team members. A reversible leadership with an informal contract makes the team less vulnerable. The team’s professionals can thus easily handle difficult situations and internal tensions, facilitating leadership and management of multidisciplinary teams.

Originality/value

Doctors in multidisciplinary psychiatric teams use reversible leadership logic.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Johan M. Berlin and Eric D. Carlström

The purpose of this paper is to study why collaboration among police, fire, and ambulance services is minimised at accident scenes.

2381

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study why collaboration among police, fire, and ambulance services is minimised at accident scenes.

Design/methodology/approach

Observations and semi‐structured interviews were carried out during 2007‐2008. The data material comprises a total of 248 hours of observations on 20 occasions and 57 interviews with 80 people.

Findings

The study identifies the difference between rhetoric and practice in connection with accident work. Collaboration is seen as a rhetorical ideal rather than something that is carried out in normal practice. Asymmetry, uncertainty and lack of incentives are important explanations as to why only limited forms of collaboration are actually implemented.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows a distinction between collaboration as rhetoric and practical collaboration at accident scenes.

Practical implications

The article proposes a multi‐faceted collaboration concept. In this way, collaboration can be developed and refined.

Originality/value

The results of the study show that police, fire, and ambulance services want to develop excellent forms of collaboration at the accident scene, but avoid this as it leads to uncertainty and asymmetries and because of a lack of incentives. However, simpler forms of collaboration may be realistic in the organisation of everyday work at accident scenes.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Johan M. Berlin, Eric D. Carlström and Håkan S. Sandberg

There is a tendency in team research to employ concepts of stepwise models, reaching from the primitive to the excellent, to suggest that a higher level of evolution is better…

9022

Abstract

Purpose

There is a tendency in team research to employ concepts of stepwise models, reaching from the primitive to the excellent, to suggest that a higher level of evolution is better than the basic and simple. This tendency includes typologies of teams. This article aims to question the relevance of this view.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in three steps. In the first step, articles and books analyzing teams and teamwork from stepwise analytical models were collected. In the second step the collected data were classified into different themes. Each stepwise model was classified into one essential denomination. This classification resulted in eight themes. In the third step each theme was analyzed, which led to the fusion of some of the themes.

Findings

The conclusion is that a synchronous, complementary or mature team is not necessarily optimal. Contrary to this, a differentiated, sequential or multi team approach can be optimal for some purposes. Team research needs to establish a more open, inductive and critical attitude than at present.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the need to observe and use team theories in a balanced and critical way.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Johan M. Berlin

– The aim of this paper was to identify and study common incentives for teamwork.

2980

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper was to identify and study common incentives for teamwork.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed as a case study. The case consists of teamwork at a university hospital. At the hospital, ten psychiatric teams were studied for a period of four years (2008-2011). Each team was followed for 12-18 months. Data were collected through interviews (n=48) and observations (n=52) of the teamwork at treatment conferences.

Findings

The common incentives identified consist of shared responsibility, appreciation and long-sightedness. The incidence of a silent contract is highlighted as an explanation for the team's cohesion.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted in a public organisation within one field. The results should therefore be interpreted with some caution.

Practical implications

The study is useful for practitioners to understand the importance of common incentives as a collective driving force. By developing well-adapted common incentives, the practical work can be developed, refined and improved.

Originality/value

The significance of common incentives and the unspoken contract in the team is identified.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Annika Andersson, Eric D. Carlstrom, Bengt Ahgren and Johan M. Berlin

– The purpose of this paper is to identify what is practiced during collaboration exercises and possible facilitators for inter-organisational collaboration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what is practiced during collaboration exercises and possible facilitators for inter-organisational collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 23 participants from four collaboration exercises in Sweden were carried out during autumn 2011. Interview data were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Findings indicate that the exercises tend to focus on intra-organisational routines and skills, rather than developing collaboration capacities. What the participants practiced depended on roles and order of arrival at the exercise. Exercises contributed to practicing leadership roles, which was considered essential since crises are unpredictable and require inter-organisational decision making.

Originality/value

The results of this study indicate that the ability to identify boundary objects, such as injured/patients, was found to be important in order for collaboration to occur. Furthermore, lessons learned from exercises could benefit from inter-organisational evaluation. By introducing and reinforcing certain elements and distinct aims of the exercise, the proactive function of collaboration exercises can be clarified.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Johan M. Berlin and Eric D. Carlström

Earlier studies have identified artefacts, but have only to a lesser degree looked at their effects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how artefacts contribute to…

1268

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier studies have identified artefacts, but have only to a lesser degree looked at their effects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how artefacts contribute to organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A trauma team at a university hospital has been observed and its members interviewed.

Findings

The trauma team showed itself to be rich on artefacts since it had strong internal driving forces, high legitimacy, and tried to live up to high expectations from the outside. Its members were motivated to be in the forefront of trauma care. Through renewal, the team succeeded in maintaining demarcation. It also succeeded in systemising internal work tasks and made for itself a position in relation to the outside. The team's capacity, however, came to be limited by internal conflicts and battles for prestige.

Practical implications

The study shows that informal logic has a strong influence on teams. Teamwork contributed to the development of organisational structure and motivation for the personnel.

Originality/value

Earlier studies advocate the important role of artefacts in order to communicate, collaborate, negotiate or coordinate activities. The conclusion is that artefacts also have an organising and developing effect on teams in a fragmented and differentiated healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Tomas Riha

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and, conversely…

2576

Abstract

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and, conversely, innovative thought structures and attitudes have almost always forced economic institutions and modes of behaviour to adjust. We learn from the history of economic doctrines how a particular theory emerged and whether, and in which environment, it could take root. We can see how a school evolves out of a common methodological perception and similar techniques of analysis, and how it has to establish itself. The interaction between unresolved problems on the one hand, and the search for better solutions or explanations on the other, leads to a change in paradigma and to the formation of new lines of reasoning. As long as the real world is subject to progress and change scientific search for explanation must out of necessity continue.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Jon Bokrantz, Anders Skoogh, Cecilia Berlin and Johan Stahre

Scholars and practitioners within industrial maintenance management are focused on understanding antecedents, correlates and consequences of the concept of “Smart Maintenance,”…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars and practitioners within industrial maintenance management are focused on understanding antecedents, correlates and consequences of the concept of “Smart Maintenance,” which consists of the four dimensions, namely, data-driven decision-making, human capital resource, internal integration and external integration. In order to facilitate this understanding, valid and reliable empirical measures need to be developed. Therefore, this paper aims to develop a psychometric instrument that measures the four dimensions of Smart Maintenance.

Design/methodology/approach

The results from two sequential empirical studies are presented, which include generating items to represent the constructs, assessment of content validity, as well as an empirical pilot test. With input from 50 industrial experts, a pool of 80 items that represent the constructs are generated. Thereafter, using data from 42 industrial and academic raters, the content validity of all items is assessed quantitatively. Finally, using data from 59 manufacturing plants, the dimensionality and factor structure of the instrument are tested.

Findings

The authors demonstrate content validity and provide evidence of good model fit and psychometric properties for one-factor models with 8–11 items for each of the four constructs, as well as a combined 24-item four-factor model.

Originality/value

The authors provide recommendations for scholarly use of the instrument in further theory-testing research, as well as its practical use to assess, benchmark and longitudinally evaluate Smart Maintenance within the manufacturing industry.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sigrid Pauwels, Johan De Walsche and Dra. Lies Declerck

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the intrinsic…

Abstract

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the intrinsic challenges of the academic educational setting, and the way architectural education can fit in and benefit from it, without losing its specific design oriented qualities. Therefore, they unravel the process of architectural design research, as a discipline-authentic way of knowledge production, leading to the identification of a number of implicit features of an academic architectural learning environment. The disquisition is based on educational arguments pointed out by literature and theory. Furthermore, the authors analyze whether this learning environment can comply with general standards of external quality assurance and accreditation systems. Doing so, they reveal the Achilles’ heel of architectural education: the incompatibility of the design jury with formalized assessment frameworks. Finally, the authors conclude with an advocacy for academic freedom. To assure the quality of academic architectural programs, it is necessary that universities maintain a critical attitude towards standardized policy frameworks.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

1 – 10 of 249