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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Anthony Wake, Jill Davies, Celia Drake, Michael Rowbotham, Nicola Smith and Rowena Rossiter

This collaborative paper (working together) describes collaborative practice development and research by and with people from the learning disabilities community. This paper aims…

Abstract

Purpose

This collaborative paper (working together) describes collaborative practice development and research by and with people from the learning disabilities community. This paper aims to show some of the activities which supported the collaborative practice development and research to show and encourage others to do more collaboration. The paper format is based on a previous collaborative paper published in the Tizard Learning Disability Review (Chapman et al., 2013).

Design/methodology/approach

The collaborative practice development and feasibility study [1] focuses on an intervention called Keep Safe. This is an intervention for young people with learning disabilities who are 12 years and older and have shown “out-of-control” or harmful sexual behaviour.

Findings

The paper gives examples of activities of the Keep Safe Advisory Group in planning, doing and thinking about Keep Safe development and feasibility. The authors list some good things and some difficulties in collaborating. They look at which parts of Frankena et al.’s (2019a) Consensus Statement on how to do inclusive research were done, which ones were not, and why.

Social implications

The paper ends with some thoughts about collaborating with people from the learning disabilities community: for people with learning disabilities, practitioners and researchers.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its illustration of collaborative practice development and research and measuring the activities against the inclusive research consensus statement.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Jill Davies and George Matuska

Research into the skills and competencies required by staff working with people with learning disabilities has concentrated on staff views. The purpose of this paper is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into the skills and competencies required by staff working with people with learning disabilities has concentrated on staff views. The purpose of this paper is to explore what people with learning disabilities want from the workforce supporting them. The evaluation was commissioned by Health Education England working across Kent, Surrey and Sussex (HEE KSS).

Design/methodology/approach

An easy read questionnaire, co-produced with people with learning disabilities, was completed with 70 participants, 65 of whom attended one of 10 workshops. Two questionnaires were also completed by parents on behalf of their child. The workshops also allowed for open discussion.

Findings

People with learning disabilities value a workforce with a positive attitude, with staff who are skilled in supporting people to gain independence and have a voice.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are relevant to staff recruitment, matching of staff to services and staff training.

Originality/value

Although there is some previous research around service user views, this evaluation had a larger sample size. The findings were similar to previous studies, particularly around the kind of qualities required from staff, which were the ability to listen, have trust and be able to learn specific skills. Although the highest representation was from young people and young adults, participants ranged from 12 to over 65 years. Differences in views according to participant age ranges are also noted.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13619322200600025. When citing the…

103

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13619322200600025. When citing the article, please cite: Jill Davies, Alison Giraud-Saunders, (2006), “Support and Services for Young People with Learning Disabilities and Mental Health Problems”, Mental Health Review Journal, Vol. 11 Iss: 3, pp. 8 - 15.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00346659710157240. When citing the…

1063

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00346659710157240. When citing the article, please cite: Suzanne Owen, Pam Schickler, Jill Davies, (1997), “Food choice: how to assess attitudes of pre-adolescent children”, Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 97 Iss: 1, pp. 5 - 11.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Jill Davies

This condition is very common but candiet help? Jill Davies PhD reports

Abstract

This condition is very common but can diet help? Jill Davies PhD reports

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Jill Davies, Peter Dettmar and Roger Hoare

It is well documented that women are prone to constipation‐type symptoms premenstrually. An increase in non‐starch polysaccharide intake of 5.9 g/d in the form of palatable drink…

159

Abstract

It is well documented that women are prone to constipation‐type symptoms premenstrually. An increase in non‐starch polysaccharide intake of 5.9 g/d in the form of palatable drink has proved to be of symptomatic benefit during the premenstrual phase of the cycle resulting in a significant increase in stool frequency, significant decreases in straining at the end of defecation and feelings of incomplete evacuation and the production of less well formed stools.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Jill Davies

Discusses practical issues about dietary survey methods for usewith free‐living individuals. Reviews prospective and retrospectivemethods indicating that no single method is…

Abstract

Discusses practical issues about dietary survey methods for use with free‐living individuals. Reviews prospective and retrospective methods indicating that no single method is flawless. Likely sources of error include bias as a result of sampling and response; changes in diet; variation with time; frequency of consumption; reporting food weight and matching foods with those in tables of food composition. Concludes that the choice of method will depend on the purpose of the investigation, and factors such as interest in food requirements, association between diet and disease and the need to know about the intake of individuals or groups of people will be highly relevant.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Helen Lightowler and Jill Davies

Discusses the non‐dairy alternatives to milk and dairy products. Looks at a range of products suitable for the “vegan dairy” and compares the nutrient profiles with those of…

3139

Abstract

Discusses the non‐dairy alternatives to milk and dairy products. Looks at a range of products suitable for the “vegan dairy” and compares the nutrient profiles with those of traditional milk and dairy products. Concludes that vegans should choose non‐dairy alternative products which have been fortified. The way forward is to expand the range of fortified “vegan dairy” products, to increase the availability of these foods and, in time, to reduce their price.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Jill Davies and Hazel Morgan

This article describes a project that explored the views, experiences and aspirations of young people with Down's Syndrome and their family carers. Each young person had gone or…

Abstract

This article describes a project that explored the views, experiences and aspirations of young people with Down's Syndrome and their family carers. Each young person had gone or was going through the transition to adulthood. Following a scoping study, young people who were leading the lives of their choice, for example through use of person‐centred planning or direct payments, were interviewed, and their stories were published in a booklet. The next phase brought other young people and their families together in workshops to support them in planning for their future, based on the information from the booklet. Interviews with the young people and their families dispelled the myth that parents are obstacles to progress and change. All families actively supported their son or daughter to achieve their aspirations and had high expectations for them.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Jill Davies and Helen Lightowler

Discusses the plant‐based alternatives to meat. Looks at the production and uses of a range of meat alternatives from different sources including: soya beans; wheat protein; pea…

4908

Abstract

Discusses the plant‐based alternatives to meat. Looks at the production and uses of a range of meat alternatives from different sources including: soya beans; wheat protein; pea and wheat protein; and myco‐protein. Compares the nutrient profiles with those of meat. Concludes that the way forward is to create new products based on plant proteins and to veganise existing vegetarian meat alternatives.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 169