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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Caroline Norrie, Jenny Weinstein, Ray Jones, Rick Hood and Sadiq Bhanbro

The purpose of this paper is to report on the introduction of individual personal budgets for older people and people with mental health problems in one local authority (LA) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the introduction of individual personal budgets for older people and people with mental health problems in one local authority (LA) in 2011.

Design/methodology/approach

Jenny Weinstein is a Hon Senior Lecturer at Kingston University, Professor Ray Jones and Rick Hood are based at the Joint Faculty of Health and Social Care, St George's, University of London and Kingston University, London, UK.A qualitative study is described in which structured interviews were carried out with participants belonging to each service user group. The study aimed to explore the following issues: first, service users’ experiences of the assessment process, second, whether service users wanted full control of their budgets and third, if personal budgets make a difference to quality of life.

Findings

xService users (n=7 older people and carers; n=7 people with mental health problems) found the personal budgets system and assessment process difficult to understand and its administration complex. Older people in particular were reluctant to assume full control and responsibility for managing their own personal budget in the form of a Direct Payment. Participants in both groups reported their continued reliance on traditional home care or day care services. These findings were reported back to the LA to help staff review the implementation of personal budgets for these two user groups.

Research limitations/implications

Study participant numbers are low due to difficulties recruiting. Several potential participants were not interviewed due to their frailty.

Practical implications

Studies of this type are important for constructing local knowledge about national policies such as the implementation of personal budgets in social care.

Originality/value

Studies of this type are important for constructing local knowledge about national policies such as the implementation of personal budgets in social care.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Jenny Weinstein and Markella Boudioni

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the need for a more holistic approach to mental health training that brings together the medical and the social knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the need for a more holistic approach to mental health training that brings together the medical and the social knowledge and skills required by today's practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the authors' experience of developing, delivering and evaluating a joint mental health programme at London South Bank University between 2004 and 2008.

Findings

The authors suggest some advantages of the model as indicated by the scant literature, the findings of a small pilot evaluation study and from information recorded and shared by other university providers of joint programmes – the Joint Programmes Forum. Further investigation is recommended.

Research limitations/implications

The absence of systematic evaluation of joint programmes over the 20 years of their existence and the limitations of the evaluation undertaken by the authors is acknowledged.

Originality/value

It is suggested in the paper that a specialist holistic training that incorporates nursing, social work (and in the future possibly occupational therapy and psychology) knowledge and skills would create well‐prepared professionals to work with mental health and learning disability service user groups (and a similar model could equally be explored for older people and people with physical disabilities or long‐term health conditions). This may be considered as a more successful solution to the effective integration of interprofessional education than the current struggles to superimpose it on uni‐professional courses.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Di Bailey

331

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Deborah N. Brewis and Sarah Taylor Silverwood

Annotation is a practice that is familiar to many of us, and yet it is a practice so natural that it is hard to pin down its characteristics, to find where its edges are, and…

Abstract

Annotation is a practice that is familiar to many of us, and yet it is a practice so natural that it is hard to pin down its characteristics, to find where its edges are, and identify what it does for us. In this piece, we use reflections on the practices of annotation in four fields of work: academia, software engineering, medical sonography and visual art as a point of departure to theorise annotation as a set of practices that bridge reading, writing and thinking. We think about annotation being performative and consider what and how it brings into being. Revealing hidden practices in our working lives, such as annotation, helps us to understand how knowledge comes to be created, disseminated, legitimated and popularised. To this end, we make the practices of annotation involved in writing the present piece visible in an effort to write differently in management and organisation studies, unpicking and exposing it as ever dialogical and unfinished.

Details

Writing Differently
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-337-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jenny Karlsson and Per Skålén

– This paper aims to study front-line employees’ contribution to service innovation, when they contribute and how they are involved in service innovation.

3981

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study front-line employees’ contribution to service innovation, when they contribute and how they are involved in service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a multiple-case study on service innovation in four organizations with extensive front-line employee involvement. The main data collection methods are interviews and observations.

Findings

The paper suggests that front-line employees contribute customer knowledge, product knowledge and practice knowledge during five phases of the service innovation process – project formation, idea generation, service design, testing and implementation – and that front-line employee involvement ranges from active to passive.

Research limitations/implications

Statistical generalization of the results is needed.

Practical implications

The paper reveals that early and active front-line employee involvement in the service innovation process creates conditions for a positive contribution to service innovation.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that early and active knowledge contributions by front-line employees to the service innovation process are associated with the creation of attractive value propositions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jenni Romaniuk and John Dawes

Investigates the purchasing of brands across different price tiers. The purpose was to determine if buying across price tiers followed the same pattern widely found in brand…

3132

Abstract

Purpose

Investigates the purchasing of brands across different price tiers. The purpose was to determine if buying across price tiers followed the same pattern widely found in brand purchasing, known as the Duplication of Purchase Law.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses a consumer survey methodology, using bottled wine as an example category. It provides evidence that while buyers exhibit repeat‐purchase loyalty to price tiers, they also buy from a repertoire of different price tiers.

Findings

Finds that sharing of purchases with other price tiers does approximate the Duplication of Purchase Law. That is, a price tier shares customers with other price tiers approximately in line with the overall popularity of those other price tiers. This suggests that competition between price tiers is largely predictable, and based on the prevalence of purchases at each tier. However, there is also consistent “partitioning” where adjacent price tiers share customers to a greater extent than would be expected under the Duplication of Purchase Law.

Originality/value

This research is valuable to both marketers and researchers, as it provides a quantifiable context and structure to those examining competition from a pricing perspective. It provides insights into where new brands should be launched and potential cannibalization effects. Finally, the presence of a price repertoire suggests that researchers should be wary of categorizing buyers to specific segments based on single answers to questions about “last” or “typical” price paid for purchases. Several fruitful areas for further research also emerge from this study, in particular the examination of what price levels or tiers actually constitute break‐points in markets, whereby brands residing in one tier are recognized as markedly different to those in other tiers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Lake Sagaris and Ignacio Tiznado-Aitken

Sustainable transport is often defined according to energy efficiency and environmental impacts. With global approval during Habitat III, however, a set of Sustainable Development…

Abstract

Sustainable transport is often defined according to energy efficiency and environmental impacts. With global approval during Habitat III, however, a set of Sustainable Development Goals have become the focus for human development until 2030, underlining the relevance of health, equity and other social issues.

These goals raise the challenge of achieving significant progress towards ‘transport justice’ in diverse societies and contexts. While exclusion occurs for different reasons, discrimination, based on cultural roles, combines with sexual harassment and other mobility barriers to limit women’s mobility. This makes gender an area of particular interest and potential insight for considering equity within sustainability and its social components.

Using data from Metropolitan Santiago to ground a conceptual exploration, this chapter examines the equity implications of women’s travel patterns and sustainable transport. Key findings underline the importance of considering non-work trip purposes and achieving better land-use combinations to accommodate care-oriented trips. Moreover, barriers linked to unsafe public transport environments limit women’s mobility and, therefore, their participation. Women account for a disproportionately high number of walking trips, a situation that can be interpreted as ‘greater sustainability’ in terms of energy use and emissions, but suggests significant inequalities in access. Environmental and economic sustainability gains may be achieved at a high social cost, unless specific measures are taken.

Details

Urban Mobility and Social Equity in Latin America: Evidence, Concepts, Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-009-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Katie Beavan

This chapter takes the form of an open feminist letter, a complaint and a manifesto presented to the Critical Management Studies (CMS) Academy. It is posted with urgency at a time…

Abstract

This chapter takes the form of an open feminist letter, a complaint and a manifesto presented to the Critical Management Studies (CMS) Academy. It is posted with urgency at a time when Patriarchy is resurging across the globe. My complaint is against the misogyny and the moral injury done to all of us and to our participants through our detached, disembodied, non-relation, pseudo-objective, masculine ways of becoming and being CMS scholars. Drawing on the thinking of Hélène Cixous, I offer five gifts as strategies to break with the masculine reckoning and open up our scholarship to féminine multiplicity and generativity: loving not knowing, return to our material bodies, rightsizing theory, knowledge made flesh-to-flesh and women’s writing. I visit, and suggest our scholarship will benefit from visiting, Cixous’s School of the Dead and her School of Dreams. I advocate for social theatre/performative auto/ethnography as a way to effect change in organisations. Finally, I present a manifesto for women’s writing that can help take our scholarship ‘home’ and contribute to the creation of flourishing organisations. This letter is a Call to Arms.

Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Elisabeth Dunne, Jenny Wren and Alex Janes

This chapter presents two case studies to address the challenge of how students in large, diverse classes can become effectively engaged in their learning through the support of…

Abstract

This chapter presents two case studies to address the challenge of how students in large, diverse classes can become effectively engaged in their learning through the support of technology. Implementation of two modules in the University of Exeter Business School is explored: a first-year management module wherein students make use of camcorders and a master's module where students use wikis. Each has been important in coming to understand the inter-relationship of pedagogic processes and technology use, in particular in the context of group work. Data on student outcomes and perceptions have been collected through ongoing monitoring, individual and group reflective accounts, tutor and student-led surveys and informal verbal feedback. Overall, the use of both technologies is highly valued by most students and by the teachers, despite the many (and sometimes unexpected) difficulties associated with their management. The main benefits are in the way that they can be used to support attendance, group cohesion and quality of work, in an ethos where the importance of group work is central to learning and where individuals are recognised for what they can contribute despite the large cohort size and the many different nationalities.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Online Learning Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-236-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Dineke van der Walt and Monika Fabijanska

Monika Fabijanska's groundbreaking exhibition The Un-Heroic Act showcased 20 representative artworks to survey the iconographic variety of representations of rape in contemporary…

Abstract

Monika Fabijanska's groundbreaking exhibition The Un-Heroic Act showcased 20 representative artworks to survey the iconographic variety of representations of rape in contemporary women's art in the United States since the 1960s. Organized by the Andrew and Anya Shiva Gallery at John Jay College, City University of New York in 2018, the exhibition's wide range of pieces was brought together in dialogue for the first time to confront prevailing sexual violence misconceptions, rape myths, and to fill the void in women's art history.

In this chapter, Fabijanska is interviewed to glean insight into the curatorial strategies she deploys as challenges and sensitivities surrounding rape play out in the context of an art exhibition and catalog. Although The Un-Heroic Act has attracted substantial media coverage and scholarly attention, the role of curatorial intention and considerations in mediating difficult content to viewers in an educational setting, and shaping understanding of a complex issue, has not yet been explored in depth. Through this interview, these pertinent questions are unpacked.

Addressing some of the curatorial challenges she faced, Fabijanska brings to light the value that exhibition texts, audience engagement programs, contextualizing comments, and teaching hold. She shares her careful selection process, highlighting the necessity of taking a collaborative approach and working toward crafting “safe spaces” within which difficult questions can be broached.

Details

Trauma-Informed Pedagogy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-497-7

Keywords

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