Search results

1 – 10 of 57
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Johnna Capitano, Kristie L. McAlpine and Jeffrey H. Greenhaus

A core concept of work–home interface research is boundary permeability – the frequency with which elements from one domain cross, or permeate, the boundary of another domain…

Abstract

A core concept of work–home interface research is boundary permeability – the frequency with which elements from one domain cross, or permeate, the boundary of another domain. Yet, there remains ambiguity as to what these elements are and how these permeations impact important outcomes such as role satisfaction and role performance. The authors introduce a multidimensional perspective of work–home boundary permeability, identifying five forms of boundary permeation: task, psychological, role referencing, object, and people. Furthermore, based on the notion that employee control over boundary permeability behavior is the key to achieving role satisfaction and role performance, the authors examine how organizations’ HR practices, leadership, and norms impact employee control over boundary permeability in the work and home domains. The authors conclude with an agenda for future research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-852-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Jeffrey H. Greenhaus, Tammy D. Allen and Paul E. Spector

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of work–family conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of work–family conflict and then…

Abstract

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of work–family conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of work–family conflict and then present a theoretical model that depicts the psychological process by which work–family conflict affects negative emotions, dissatisfaction with life and its component roles, health-related behavior, and physical health. We conclude with suggestions regarding the development of a future research agenda.

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Barrie Litzky and Jeffrey Greenhaus

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of gender, work factors, and non‐work factors with aspirations to positions in senior management. A process model of…

4950

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of gender, work factors, and non‐work factors with aspirations to positions in senior management. A process model of senior management aspirations was developed and tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey that resulted in a sample of 368 working professionals. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to analyze results.

Findings

Women were less likely than men to desire promotion into a senior management position. Moreover, women's lower desired aspirations for promotion to senior management were due in part to the smaller degree of congruence that women perceive between personal characteristics and senior management positions and in part to the less favorable prospects for career advancement that women perceive relative to men.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional, correlational research design does not permit strong inferences regarding the causal direction of observed relationships. In addition, the specific nature of the sample (working professionals enrolled in graduate study at one university in the USA) may limit the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Because women's career aspirations are affected by their perceived congruence with senior management positions and by their perceived opportunity to reach senior management, organizations should assure that senior management roles are not predominantly associated with masculine characteristics and should evaluate their promotion systems to eliminate artificial barriers to women's advancement into senior management.

Originality/value

This research distinguishes between desired and enacted aspirations as well as provides insights into some factors that explain why women hold weaker desired aspirations for senior management positions than men.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2023

Ellen Ernst Kossek, Brenda A. Lautsch, Matthew B. Perrigino, Jeffrey H. Greenhaus and Tarani J. Merriweather

Work-life flexibility policies (e.g., flextime, telework, part-time, right-to-disconnect, and leaves) are increasingly important to employers as productivity and well-being…

Abstract

Work-life flexibility policies (e.g., flextime, telework, part-time, right-to-disconnect, and leaves) are increasingly important to employers as productivity and well-being strategies. However, policies have not lived up to their potential. In this chapter, the authors argue for increased research attention to implementation and work-life intersectionality considerations influencing effectiveness. Drawing on a typology that conceptualizes flexibility policies as offering employees control across five dimensions of the work role boundary (temporal, spatial, size, permeability, and continuity), the authors develop a model identifying the multilevel moderators and mechanisms of boundary control shaping relationships between using flexibility and work and home performance. Next, the authors review this model with an intersectional lens. The authors direct scholars’ attention to growing workforce diversity and increased variation in flexibility policy experiences, particularly for individuals with higher work-life intersectionality, which is defined as having multiple intersecting identities (e.g., gender, caregiving, and race), that are stigmatized, and link to having less access to and/or benefits from societal resources to support managing the work-life interface in a social context. Such an intersectional focus would address the important need to shift work-life and flexibility research from variable to person-centered approaches. The authors identify six research considerations on work-life intersectionality in order to illuminate how traditionally assumed work-life relationships need to be revisited to address growing variation in: access, needs, and preferences for work-life flexibility; work and nonwork experiences; and benefits from using flexibility policies. The authors hope that this chapter will spur a conversation on how the work-life interface and flexibility policy processes and outcomes may increasingly differ for individuals with higher work-life intersectionality compared to those with lower work-life intersectionality in the context of organizational and social systems that may perpetuate growing work-life and job inequality.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-389-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Jeffrey H. Greenhaus

This chapter explores the impact of employee mobility on career sustainability, that is, the extent to which a career enables an individual to remain happy, healthy, and

Abstract

This chapter explores the impact of employee mobility on career sustainability, that is, the extent to which a career enables an individual to remain happy, healthy, and productive over the life course. I argue that whether employee mobility strengthens or weakens career sustainability depends on the extent to which the mobility experience increases (sustainable) or diminishes (unsustainable) person-career fit. I suggest that different forms of mobility (e.g., upward versus lateral) may have different effects on fit and subsequent career sustainability. Moreover, it is possible that a mobility experience can enhance fit in some respects but still have a negative effect on the long-term sustainability of a career. Research is necessary to address these and other questions regarding the relationship between employee mobility and career sustainability.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Gary N. Powell and Jeffrey H. Greenhaus

The relationship between work‐family enrichment (WFE), representing positive interdependencies between individuals' work and family roles, and work‐family conflict (WFC)…

3260

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between work‐family enrichment (WFE), representing positive interdependencies between individuals' work and family roles, and work‐family conflict (WFC), representing negative interdependencies between the same roles, has been discussed but never fully clarified in the scholarly literature on the work‐family interface. The purpose of this article is to increase understanding of the relationship between these two constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between WFE and WFC is conceptualized at the level of a “resource” that may be generated in one role, work or family, and applied to the other role. This approach offers an alternative to the more typical approach of analyzing this relationship at the aggregate level across all possible resources.

Findings

The answer to the question posed in the title of the article is “yes or no”, or “it depends”. At the resource level, it is suggested that WFE is either unrelated or negatively related to WFC depending on the specific process under consideration by which experiences in one role may affect experiences in the other role.

Research limitations/implications

Future research that examines the relationship between WFE and WFC at the resource level is recommended. For this research to be conducted, new measures are needed that assess these two constructs at the resource level.

Originality/value

This article sheds light on the resource‐level conditions under which positive vs negative interdependencies between work and family roles may occur. In addition, it argues that research on the work‐family interface that goes beyond the aggregate level of analysis is sorely needed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2016

Ambrose Jones and Cynthia P. Guthrie

This study, based on our analysis of survey data from 1,242 partners and employees of a U.S. national public accounting firm, examines the impact on psychological well-being from…

Abstract

This study, based on our analysis of survey data from 1,242 partners and employees of a U.S. national public accounting firm, examines the impact on psychological well-being from the moderating effects of flexibility and role clarity on work-home conflict experienced by public accountants. Most prior research in public accounting deals with the antecedents and consequences of role stress and primarily focuses on job outcomes of turnover intentions and job satisfaction as dependent variables. Public accounting firms have responded to stressors with worker-friendly policies, largely by introducing flexibility and clarity in their organizational culture. Using a multi-disciplinary research model, we analyze the causal relationships of flexibility and clarity as moderators of the bi-directional nature of work-home conflict (work interference with home and home interference with work) on psychological well-being. Our study finds that perceptions of flexibility and role clarity drawn from a career position in public accounting can mitigate role conflict between work and home environments and contribute to enhanced psychological well-being. We also find that certain relationships described in the model are moderated by family status and age, but not by gender. Results of our study have implications to both individual public accountants and to their firms.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-977-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2023

Abstract

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-389-3

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Jeffrey H. Greenhaus, Gerard A. Callanan and Eileen Kaplan

Examines the conditions under which career goal setting contributesto effective career management. Views career management as a process bywhich individuals can make informed…

15407

Abstract

Examines the conditions under which career goal setting contributes to effective career management. Views career management as a process by which individuals can make informed decisions regarding their work lives. Highlights the role of the career goal in the career management process, and identifies the useful features of the goal‐setting process. Reviews the concepts of career indecision and career decidedness, and specifies four subtypes – developmental indecision, chronic indecision, hypervigilant decidedness, and vigilant decidedness. Discusses the implications for organizations and their employees.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Gede Riana, Lusia Adinda Dua Nurak and I. Gede Rihayana

The purpose of this paper is to examine and analyze the effect of Lamaholot culture and role conflict on occupational stress and its impact on the performance of ikat weaving…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and analyze the effect of Lamaholot culture and role conflict on occupational stress and its impact on the performance of ikat weaving female craftspeople. This research is conducted in East Nusa Tenggara Province (NTT) based on consideration of the spread of weaving industry center.

Design/methodology/approach

The study population is 388 ikat weaving craftspeople in 20 industrial centers spread over 11 sub-districts in East Flores Regency. Inferential statistics which is often called as inductive statistics or probability statistics is statistical techniques for analyzing sample data and the results are applied to the population. This analysis is used to test the relationship between variables in the hypothesis (Sugiono, 2014, p. 207). This research uses structural equation modeling with variance-based or component-based approach with partial least square to test hypothesis and produce a fit model.

Findings

Lamaholot culture has a negative effect on occupational stress, on the other hand, role conflict has a positive effect on occupational stress. The higher the Lamaholot culture and the lower the role conflict will have an impact on the reduction of weaving workers’ stress. The higher the Lamaholot culture, and the lower the role conflict and the occupational stress will have an impact on the improvement of performance of weaving craftspeople. Occupational stress mediates the effect of Lamaholot culture and role conflict on the performance of weaving craftspeople.

Originality/value

The originality of this research lies in the use of occupational stress as a mediator between relationship of Lamaholot culture and role conflict on performance. On the other hand, the use of Lamaholot culture variable has a function as a derivative of organizational culture theory derived from the local culture of NTT, Indonesia. With the discovery of novelty from this research, it is expected to enrich the literature related to the field of behavioral organizational science, especially about role conflict, occupational stress and organizational culture using local cultural values of Lamaholot.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 57