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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Quan Lin, Wanchao Guan and Nana Zhang

This study aims to examine the consequences of work–family conflict and explore the mechanism by which it influences organizational citizenship behavior from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the consequences of work–family conflict and explore the mechanism by which it influences organizational citizenship behavior from the perspective of changes in and preservation of family well-being (emotional resources).

Design/methodology/approach

Work–family conflict has always been an important research topic in the field of organizational behavior; scholars have studied the relationship between it and organizational citizenship behavior from different perspectives. To better understand the mechanism of work–family conflict on organizational citizenship behavior, we use a longitudinal design and analyze the multi-stage matching data of 209 employees and their superiors from six cities in southern China. The authors construct a theoretical model based on the conservation of resources theory to explore the mechanism by which work–family conflict influences organizational citizenship behavior when taking employees’ family well-being as a mediator and work–family segmentation preference as the boundary condition.

Findings

Work–family conflict has a significant negative effect on family well-being and this effect is moderated by work–home segmentation preferences. Work–family conflict also has a significant indirect effect on organizational citizenship behavior through family well-being and this indirect effect is enhanced by an increase in the level of preference for work–home segmentation.

Originality/value

This study enriches our knowledge of the moderating variables in the study of work–family relationships from the perspective of individual personality traits. It also provides a new perspective for the study of such relationships in the context of Chinese family culture.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Ilhami Yucel, Muhammed Sabri Şirin and Murat Baş

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention and whether work engagement has a mediating effect and supervisor support has a moderated mediation effect in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the study is composed of public hospital employees in Erzincan province. After removing the missing and incorrect ones from the questionnaires distributed to 1,044 employees of the hospital, 350 were evaluated. The data of the survey were analyzed and interpreted with statistical package programs. Regression analysis is used to investigate the association between the variables.

Findings

This paper finds significant negative associations of work–family conflict with work engagement and work engagement with turnover intention. A significant positive association is found between work–family conflict and turnover intention. In the meantime work engagement has a partial mediating effect on this relationship. Another important result of the research is that supervisor support has a moderator role between work–family conflict and work engagement and has a moderated mediation role at the model in which work–family conflict is independent, turnover intention is dependent and work engagement is a mediator variable.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted only in Erzincan province with a limited number of participants, and only health sector employees were examined. It is possible to obtain distinct results in future research studies conducted on different sector employees. Moreover, only the work–family conflict variable was examined in the research. It is possible to expand the scope by also including the family–work conflict variable in future studies.

Originality/value

This research is the first study examining the mediating role of work engagement in the relationship between work–family conflict and turnover intention on healthcare employees in Turkey. Also, this paper is the first attempt to investigate moderated mediation model with the specified variables (work–family conflict, turnover intention, work engagement and supervisor support) in the model by using the frameworks of leader–member exchange and social exchange theories. This research answers research calls to study the moderating function of supervisor support during mediating role of work engagement, since the moderation impact clarifies the circumstances under which supervisor support is connected with the favorable results. This study also revealed how effective the supervisor support is on employees experiencing work–family conflict and their attitudes like work engagement and turnover intention. The consequences of such studies influence the way organizations handle and solve the problems in their organizations today. It takes into account moderated mediation modeling with the management subject in hospital employees.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2007

Cynthia A. Thompson, Steven A.Y. Poelmans, Tammy D. Allen and Jeanine K. Andreassi

In this chapter, we review empirical research evidence regarding coping and work–family conflict. Limitations and gaps associated with the existing literature are…

Abstract

In this chapter, we review empirical research evidence regarding coping and work–family conflict. Limitations and gaps associated with the existing literature are discussed. Of special note is the finding that there is little systematic research that examines the process of coping with work–family conflict. Building on the general stress and coping literature, we present a theoretical model that is specifically focused on the process of coping with work–family conflict, and highlight presumed personal and situational antecedents. Finally, the chapter concludes with an agenda for future research.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Meral Erdirençelebi

In recent years, preparations for the transition from the Post-industrial society to Community 5.0 have been continuing at full speed. The change in this process…

Abstract

In recent years, preparations for the transition from the Post-industrial society to Community 5.0 have been continuing at full speed. The change in this process necessitates changes in the roles and structure of the labour force in societies. While work and family living spaces of the individual change the dimensions of his/her interaction, they increase the importance of work–family life balance gradually. The basis of conflicts (imbalances) in roles in work and family life is based on three pillars: time, tension and behaviour. The conflicts in the work and family life spaces take place in two sub-dimensions, namely ‘work-family conflict’ which is directed from work to family and ‘family-work conflict’ which is directed from family to work. The conflict between work and family life leads to individual, organisational and familial consequences. Effective communication with the social support of the organisation and the members of family is of great importance for individuals not to experience a work–family conflict.

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Tharindu C. Dodanwala and Pooja Shrestha

Work–family conflict plays a vital role in employees’ work-related satisfaction and emotional exhaustion measures. Yet, the theoretical interrelationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

Work–family conflict plays a vital role in employees’ work-related satisfaction and emotional exhaustion measures. Yet, the theoretical interrelationship between work–family conflict, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction has not been fully explored in the construction literature. Hence, this study aims to assess emotional exhaustion’s mediating role in the relationship between work–family conflict and job satisfaction of the construction professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a cross-sectional survey of 308 project-level construction professionals in Sri Lanka. A confirmatory factor analysis followed by three structural equation models was used in analyzing the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results support the mediation model of emotional exhaustion, in which the emotional exhaustion fully mediated the relationship between work–family conflict and job satisfaction. Hence, the authors concluded that a higher level of work–family conflict would directly contribute to a greater degree of emotional exhaustion, which in turn lessens the job satisfaction of the project employees.

Originality/value

In identifying how work–family conflict, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction are linked together, the present study added the mediating role of emotional exhaustion to the previous empirical research on the relationship between work–family conflict and job satisfaction in the context of the construction industry.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Jeffrey H. Greenhaus, Tammy D. Allen and Paul E. Spector

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of work–family conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of work–family conflict

Abstract

In this chapter, we review the literature on the relationship of work–family conflict with health outcomes and well-being. We discuss the meaning of work–family conflict and then present a theoretical model that depicts the psychological process by which work–family conflict affects negative emotions, dissatisfaction with life and its component roles, health-related behavior, and physical health. We conclude with suggestions regarding the development of a future research agenda.

Details

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Leah Ruppanner

To investigate the association between country-level differences in childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the association between country-level differences in childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary representation and individual-level conflict between work and family.

Methodology/approach

This study applies data from the 2002 International Social Survey Program (n = 14,000 + ) for respondents in 29 countries and pairs them with macro-level measures of childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary representation. I estimate the model using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM 7) and also assess cross-level interactions by gender and parental status.

Findings

The models show that female parliamentary representation has a robust negative association with individual-level reports of work–family and family–work conflict. These associations do not vary by gender or parental status. Also, mothers report less family–work conflict in countries with more expansive childcare enrollment, indicating that this welfare policy benefits the intended group.

Research limitations/implications

This research implies that greater female parliamentary representation has widespread benefits to all citizens’, rather than just women’s or mothers’, work–family and family–work conflict. Additional longitudinal research would benefit this area of study.

Practical implications

This research suggests that increasing female parliamentary representation at the country-level may promote work–life balance at the individual-level. It also indicates that public childcare enrollment benefits women through lower family–work conflict which may encourage continuous maternal labor force participation and reduce economic gender inequality.

Originality/value

This chapter builds on an emerging area of work–family research applying multilevel modeling to draw empirical links between individual work–family experiences and macro-level structural variation.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Anja-Kristin Abendroth and Mareike Reimann

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the context dependence of the implications of telework for work–family conflict. It examines whether and how the implications of…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the context dependence of the implications of telework for work–family conflict. It examines whether and how the implications of telework for strain-based and time-based work–family conflict depend on work–family-supportive and high-demand workplace cultures. Based on a sample of 4,898 employees derived from a unique linked employer–employee study involving large organizations in different industries in Germany, multilevel fixed-effects regressions were estimated.

The results show that telework is associated with perceived higher levels of both time-based and strain-based work–family conflict, and that this is partly related to overtime work involved in telework. However, teleworkers experience higher levels of work–family conflict if they perceive their workplace culture to be highly demanding, and lower levels if supervisor work–family support is readily available.

Future research is required to investigate how the conclusions from this research vary between heterogonous employees and how work–family-supportive and high-demand workplace cultures interrelate in their implications on the use of telework for work–family conflict.

The findings show how important it is to implement telework in a way that not only accommodates employers’ interest in flexibilization, but that it also makes it possible to reconcile work with a family life that involves high levels of responsibility.

This is the first study which examines whether telework is either a resource that reduces or a demand that promotes work–family conflict by focusing on whether this depends on perceived workplace culture.

Details

The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Hsiang-Lan Cheng, Tung-Ching Lin, Wee-Kheng Tan and Chao-Min Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex relationships between permeability, work-family conflict, moral disengagement, behavioral disengagement, job strain and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex relationships between permeability, work-family conflict, moral disengagement, behavioral disengagement, job strain and job engagement. In addition, this study aims to determine whether moral disengagement acts as a moderator and mediator in the relationship between work-family conflict and behavioral disengagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply partial least squares structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses, using a sample of 176 valid responses.

Findings

The results indicate that permeability is likely to promote work-family conflict, which in turn may trigger moral disengagement. Moral disengagement may lead to behavioral disengagement, which in turn may increase job strain and decrease job engagement. The findings also show that work-family conflict does not have a significant effect on behavioral disengagement, suggesting that moral disengagement fully mediates the influence of work-family conflict on behavioral disengagement. In addition, the moderating effect of moral disengagement is not significant.

Originality/value

Applying the transactional model of stress and coping theory and the moral disengagement theory, this study contributes to a better understanding of employees' experience of job strain caused by work-family conflict (induced by permeability of IM usage), as well as the employee's coping response.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Navaneethakrishnan Kengatharan

Drawing on the role theory and work–family border theory, this study aims to examine the relationship between work/family demands and sui generis forms of work–family

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the role theory and work–family border theory, this study aims to examine the relationship between work/family demands and sui generis forms of work–family conflict and further investigates the gender role ideology as a moderator of the relationship between work/family demands and work–family conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were garnered with a self-reported questionnaire from randomly selected 569 employees working in the banking sector. As a caveat, nonresponse bias, common method variance and the reliability and validity of the measure were examined.

Findings

The results revealed that work demand and family demand were strongly related to both time- and strain-based work–family conflict; however, the relationship was not established with behavioural-based conflict. Notably, the findings affirmed the existence of a neglected form of psychological-based work–family conflict as the pièce de résistance and established a strong connection with its precursor. The dogma of gender role ideology, as a moderator, was indubitably confirmed and strengthened the positive relationship between family demand and family-to-work conflict.

Practical implications

The present study emphasises the importance of work/family demands and gender role ideology on work–family conflict. Consequently, it behoves human resource managers, strategists and practitioners to frame the organisational arrangements to alleviate the work–family conflict.

Originality/value

The present study fills a hiatus by establishing the relationship between work/family demand and work–family conflict with its cultural beliefs in the context of a collectivist culture.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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