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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Gabrielle Atmarow, Adam Brown, Jane Pinder and Edward Renvoize

The success of Health care professionals (nurses, a midwife, a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist) working in a large NHS Trust hospital who had completed the…

Abstract

The success of Health care professionals (nurses, a midwife, a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist) working in a large NHS Trust hospital who had completed the Certificate in Health Education with the support of their employer, were interviewed. The study objectives were to seek their views on the quality of the course, to determine the extent to which participants were able to apply their new found knowledge and skills in the care they provided to patients and the level of support received to allow them to do this. Barriers that prevented staff from routinely applying health education in their work were identified. The findings indicated that the majority found the course content to be good and relevant to their clinical work but they identified lack of time due to the pressure of routine clinical work as the main barrier to the promotion of health education in their clinical area.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Samantha A. Conroy, Nina Gupta, Jason D. Shaw and Tae-Youn Park

In this paper, we review the literature on pay variation (e.g., pay dispersion, pay compression, pay range) in organizations. Pay variation research has increased markedly…

Abstract

In this paper, we review the literature on pay variation (e.g., pay dispersion, pay compression, pay range) in organizations. Pay variation research has increased markedly in the past two decades and much progress has been made in terms of understanding its consequences for individual, team, and organizational outcomes. Our review of this research exposes several levels-related assumptions that have limited theoretical and empirical progress. We isolate the issues that deserve attention, develop an illustrative multilevel model, and offer a number of testable propositions to guide future research on pay structures.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-824-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Chris Pinder

The article surveys the general academic library response within the UK to disability legislation and the growing numbers of students declaring disabilities entering…

Abstract

Purpose

The article surveys the general academic library response within the UK to disability legislation and the growing numbers of students declaring disabilities entering higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief review of the provisions of legislation, particularly the Spe,"Integrated Manufacturing Systems" }Integrated_Manufacturing_Systemscial Educational Needs And Disability Act of 2001, and the response of funding and other bodies, the article addresses specific regional – that is, collaborative – and individual institutional initiatives.

Findings

Responses from libraries are found to be very positive and offer a service‐level benchmark to libraries in other sectors or elsewhere.

Research limitations/implications

This is a geographically focussed paper, looking at the UK and in particular the Scottish position, and other countries may present different findings.

Practical implications

An account of the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at disabled users, with much relevance to practitioner concerns.

Originality/value

The paper gives a valuable overview of the progress made in academic libraries to date on disability issues in Scotland, and in the UK, and shows that both the legislation combined with the inherent customer‐service values of the library profession have helped raise the standard of library performance in this regard.

Details

Library Review, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Tanya Fitzgerald and Sally Knipe

Abstract

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Historical Perspectives on Teacher Preparation in Aotearoa New Zealand
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-640-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Reva Berman Brown

The purpose of this paper is to describe linkages between the techniques of poetical expression and the language used by scholars to communicate management practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe linkages between the techniques of poetical expression and the language used by scholars to communicate management practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to consider the stylistic perspective of the language used for management theorising or research, viewing the documents produced by management researchers as communicating devices and cultural products which contribute to the creation or construction of the reality that they seek to describe and analyse.

Findings

The paper uncovers the poetic aspects buried – often deeply – in the language of management studies through which the concepts of, and ideas about, management are expressed.

Originality/value

The links between ways of saying usually considered to be in opposition are made known, and enjoyed.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1985

LESLIE R BALDWIN, BRIAN REDFERN, OWEN SURRIDGE, TERRY HANSTOCK, TONY WARSHAW, EDWIN FLEMING, ALLAN BUNCH and WILFRED ASHWORTH

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points…

Abstract

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points must be challenged.

Details

New Library World, vol. 86 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Emma Pauncefort

2019 was a big year. The Great Hack and investigative journalism of Carole Cadwalladr exposed the machinations of Cambridge Analytica. The US senate summoned Mark…

Abstract

2019 was a big year. The Great Hack and investigative journalism of Carole Cadwalladr exposed the machinations of Cambridge Analytica. The US senate summoned Mark Zuckerberg to face an extended interrogation on the ways in which Facebook screens content. Greta Thunberg fomented a global ‘climate emergency’ movement with attacks on lying political leaders. If 2016 saw ‘post-truth’ rise to prominence as a concept, 2019 was characterised by myriad efforts to champion truth and counter misinformation. And then the COVID-19 crisis hit. The urgency we began to feel in 2019 to address the ills in our society and hunt for a cause and cure has intensified. We now daily ask at whose door we can lay the blame and, from there, what solutions we can implement. For now, we have drawn the battle lines between tech and society and looked to pit governments against technologies which have changed the face of media. But amidst this flurry of activity, we need to stop and ask ourselves: are we setting our sights on the right actors and are we taking the right next steps?

Written in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, this contribution responds to the burning debate on how to overcome our current infodemic and immunise against future outbreaks. It offers an alternative narrative and argues for a much more radical course of action. It posits that we have misidentified the root cause of our current post-truth reality. It argues that we are in fact experiencing the extreme consequence of decades of poor education the world over. It champions a shift from drilling young people in so-called facts and figures to developing those deep levels of literacy in which critical thinking plays a fundamental part. This is not to exculpate the Facebooks and Twitters of our time – new tech has no doubt facilitated the dissemination of half-truths and untruths. But it is to insist upon contextualising our current albeit horrifying reality within a much more complex and longer-running societal challenge. In other words, this chapter makes a fresh clarion call for rethinking how we have got to where we are and where we might most meaningfully go next, as well as how, indeed, we might conceptualise the links between technology, government, media and education.

Details

Media, Technology and Education in a Post-Truth Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-907-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Xiao Zhang and Jane Yan Jiang

The purpose of this study is to examine knowledge-sharing phenomena from the perspective of recipients’ characteristics. Specifically, this study examines the influence of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine knowledge-sharing phenomena from the perspective of recipients’ characteristics. Specifically, this study examines the influence of knowledge recipients’ competence, learning attitude and personal relationship with knowledge sharer on knowledge sharers’ willingness to share.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two studies, a scenario experimental study and a field survey study to test their hypotheses about the effects of recipients’ characteristics on knowledge sharers’ willingness to share.

Findings

The results revealed that recipients’ characteristics play different roles in different situations (responsive and proactive knowledge sharing) in triggering the knowledge sharers’ motivation to share. In responsive knowledge sharing, a recipient’s learning attitude and personal relationship with the knowledge sharer affected the sharer’s willingness to share. In proactive knowledge sharing, a recipient’s professional ability and personal relationship with the sharer significantly affected the sharer’s willingness to share.

Research limitations/implications

The scenario experiment may suffer from the problem of social desirability and the external validity; this study only focuses on the simple main effect of knowledge recipients’ characteristics.

Practical implications

First, managers should encourage employees to seek information and knowledge from other colleagues, and organizations could provide support for their interaction. Second, managers need to consider the composition of team members. Third, team managers may encourage each member to develop their own special skill or knowledge. Fourth, managers could make some efforts to develop a climate of trust among employees.

Social implications

Some organization can also use practice like recognition of internal copyright or patent to protect employees’ new ideas or knowledge.

Originality/value

First, this study clarifies the relationship between knowledge sharing and other working behaviors. Second, this study contributes to the understanding of how episodic factors affect working behaviors, which has been given little attention in previous research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

The Amelia Frances Howard‐Gibbon medal of the Canadian Library Association, established in 1971 to honour outstanding illustrators of Canadian children's books, has been…

Abstract

The Amelia Frances Howard‐Gibbon medal of the Canadian Library Association, established in 1971 to honour outstanding illustrators of Canadian children's books, has been awarded this year to William Kurelek for A Prairie Boy's Summer, published in Montreal by Tundra Books. Kurelek was born near Whitford in Alberta but spent most of his early life in a Ukrainian farming community in Manitoba and his illustrations vividly capture life on a prairie farm in the '30s.

Details

Library Review, vol. 25 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1910

Very much more might be done to improve the quality of our food supplies by the great organisations that exist for the avowed object of furthering the interests of traders…

Abstract

Very much more might be done to improve the quality of our food supplies by the great organisations that exist for the avowed object of furthering the interests of traders in foodstuffs. It is no exaggeration to say that these organisations claim, and rightly claim, to speak in the aggregate on behalf of great commercial interests involving the means of livelihood of thousands of people and the most profitable disposal of millions of money. The information that they possess as to certain trade methods and requirements is necessarily unique. Apart from the commercial knowledge they possess, these organisations have funds at their command which enable them to obtain the best professional opinions on any subjects connected with the trades they represent. Their members are frequently to be found occupying positions of responsibility as the elected representatives of their fellow‐citizens on municipal councils and other public bodies, where the administration of the Food Laws and prosecutions under the Food and Drugs Acts are often under discussion. Such organisations, then, are in a position to afford an unlimited amount of valuable help by assisting to put down fraud in connection with our food supply. The dosing of foods with harmful drugs is, of course, only a part of a very much larger subject. It is, however, typical. Assuming the danger to public health that arises from the treatment of foods with harmful preservatives, the continued use of such substances cannot but be in the long run as harmful to the best interests of the traders as it is actually dangerous to public health. The trade organisations to which reference has been made might very well extend their sphere of usefulness by making it their business to seriously consider this and similar questions in the interests of public health, as well as in their own best interests. It is surely not open to doubt that a great organisation, numbering hundreds, and perhaps thousands of members, has such a membership because individual traders find it to their interest, as do people in all walks of life, to act more or less in common for the general advantage ; and, further, that it would not be to the benefit of individual members that their connection with the organisation should terminate owing to their own wrong‐doing. The executives of such trade organisations hold a sufficiently strong position to enable them to bring strong pressure to bear on those who are acting in a way that is contrary to the interests of the public generally, and of honest traders in particular, by adulterating or misbranding the food products that they gain their living by selling. It should also be plain that such trade organisations could go a long way towards solving many of the very vexed questions that arise whenever food standards and limits, for example, form the subject of discussion. These problems are not easy to deal with. The difficulties in connection with them are many and great; but such problems, however difficult of solution, are still not insoluble, and an important step towards their solution would be taken if co‐operation between those who are acting in the interests of hygienic science and those who are acting in the interests of trade could be brought about. If this could be accomplished the unedifying spectacle of alleged trade interests and the demands of public health being brought, as is so often the case, into sharp conflict, would be less frequent, and there can be no doubt that general benefit would result.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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