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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

JAMES C. SARROS and ANNE M. SARROS

This paper describes the nature of burnout among teachers, examines the differences in burnout between teachers and school‐based administrators, and explores the extent to…

Abstract

This paper describes the nature of burnout among teachers, examines the differences in burnout between teachers and school‐based administrators, and explores the extent to which specific work factors predict teacher burnout. Teachers were experiencing less Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization burnout, but more Personal Accomplishment burnout than other helping service professionals. Their levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Personal Accomplishment burnout were higher than those for administrators. Both job satisfaction and job challenge were significant predictors of each burnout sub‐scale. The findings indicate that burnout is both the result of organizational factors such as work load, as well as the result of failure of the job to satisfy the motivational needs of teachers to be challenged and rewarded by their work. These results dispute some established research findings, and contribute new evidence to the growing data base on educator burnout.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

JAMES C. SARROS

The increasing incidence of educator stress and burnout is cause for concern. Nonetheless, the findings of this Canadian‐based study indicate that school principals are…

Abstract

The increasing incidence of educator stress and burnout is cause for concern. Nonetheless, the findings of this Canadian‐based study indicate that school principals are experiencing less than average levels of Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization burnout, and an average level of Personal Accomplishment burnout. Work conditions most likely to contribute to burnout were work stress, work overload, a deteriorating sense of status and recognition, and unsatisfactory interpersonal relationships. The implications of the study are discussed in terms of both individual and organizational factors.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Richard P. Winter, James C. Sarros and George A. Tanewski

This paper presents an organizational learning framework for reframing management practices within large bureaucratic organizations. Reviewing the relevant literature, the…

Abstract

This paper presents an organizational learning framework for reframing management practices within large bureaucratic organizations. Reviewing the relevant literature, the paper argues managers' control orientations and practices effectively stifle learning and personal development by severely limiting the ability of employees to exert control or change the nature of their work activities. To encourage organizational learning, a number of reframing tools are proposed The paper concludes by discussing how reframing tools may be used in conjunction with other psychoanalytic techniques to challenge and change managers' control orientations and practices.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

James C. Sarros and Anne M. Sarros

This study of 491 government secondary school teachers in Victoria,Australia, explores the relationship between sources and types of socialsupport and teacher burnout…

Abstract

This study of 491 government secondary school teachers in Victoria, Australia, explores the relationship between sources and types of social support and teacher burnout. Examines both a conceptual model of social support and a social support instrument based on House′s typology developed for the purpose of the study. The major finding that principal support is a significant predictor of burnout is consistent with established research. However, the result that certain types of social support contribute to burnout presents a unique dimension on the social support‐burnout relationship. Also examines the support provided to others by teachers themselves and its impact on burnout. Explains the implications of the findings for theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Joseph C. Santora, James C. Sarros and Mark Esposito

– The aim of this article was to describe successor types of four nonprofit founders.

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983

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article was to describe successor types of four nonprofit founders.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses the previous case study research and participant/nonparticipant observation to illustrate the different nonprofit founder types to prepare for successors.

Findings

Four founder types included destroyer, conscientious, maverick, and controller. Each founder type had several unique characteristics. A common feature across all four types was autocratic control.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the generalizability of the findings based on the sample. Recommendations include re-examination of the ways founders approach succession issues.

Practical implications

Founders involved in succession issues can benefit by better understanding the succession process as well as the legacy they leave as a result of their approach to succession based on type.

Originality/value

This article offers new insights into the approaches nonprofit founders take about selecting a successor. Founders considering a successor can determine their type and adjust accordingly to select the best possible replacement for the organization.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

James C. Sarros and Don S. Woodman

Current changes in Australian and world economic and socialclimates have implications for business leadership, particularly at themiddle and senior management levels…

Abstract

Current changes in Australian and world economic and social climates have implications for business leadership, particularly at the middle and senior management levels. Surveys business executives attending a well‐known Australian management college during 1991 and 1992 and provides an overview of how leadership responds to and interprets these changes. Identifies five main leadership attributes, namely: vision and creativity; setting and achieving objectives; confident decision making; team building; and charisma. Associates these attributes with 16 organizational outcomes such as: organization innovation, direction setting and motivated workforce, among others. The overall results indicate that further research is needed to examine the extent to which team building and charisma as leadership attributes interact with and predict organization outcomes. Also discusses the practical implications of the findings.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

James C. Sarros

Based on a nine‐month research project involving 32 executives inboth private and public sector organizations. Executives wereinterviewed to determine their management and…

Abstract

Based on a nine‐month research project involving 32 executives in both private and public sector organizations. Executives were interviewed to determine their management and leadership styles, and how they cope in a time of economic downturn. Reproduces here the spoken responses and attitudes of some of these key executives. The full interview transcripts, business strategies, and hints for business success are published in The Executives: How to Lead, How to Manage, Lothian Books, Melbourne, Australia.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Joseph C. Santora, James C. Sarros and Mark Esposito

Presents findings of a recent survey conducted on small to mid‐sized nonprofit organizations about the types of leadership development initiatives they offer employees.

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1445

Abstract

Purpose

Presents findings of a recent survey conducted on small to mid‐sized nonprofit organizations about the types of leadership development initiatives they offer employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey and interview methods used to collect data from nonprofit executive directors who participated in this study.

Findings

Most survey participants do not have the financial and other organizational capacities to offer leadership development initiatives to employees. In‐service workshops are the most frequent type of initiative and unfortunately often this learning initiative has a low impact given its limited short‐term exposure to participants. Other leadership development initiatives may be more beneficial to employees in terms of their long‐term impact.

Practical implications

Provides recommendations for small to mid‐sized nonprofit executive directors about ways to fund leadership development initiatives.

Originality/value

Offers nonprofit executive directors with suggestions about not investing in leadership development initiatives.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Iain L. Densten and James C. Sarros

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the effect of cultural and social acceptance on CEO leadership.

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3063

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the effect of cultural and social acceptance on CEO leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Several instruments were used to capture key concepts (i.e. Organisational Culture Profile, Marlowe‐Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Transformational Leadership Inventory, and Leader Reward and Punishment Questionnaire), which were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. Data were collected from 635 Australian CEOs.

Findings

The results of hierarchical multi‐regression analysis clarified the importance of self‐deception and impression management as influential context factors, and how both operate at the pinnacle of organisations. The study also identifies that transformational and transactional leadership behaviours were uniquely influenced by specific cultural dimensions, and suggests that CEOs use combinations of these behaviours to respond to four cultural dimensions (i.e. emphasis on rewards, performance orientation, innovation, and stability) in order to produce competitive advantages.

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights how CEOs are still vulnerable to conforming to the social norms of their organisation and also how CEOs use a repertoire of leadership behaviours, in response to the importance of different cultural dimensions.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the leadership literature by directly addressing how context impacts on CEO leadership in three specific areas: social acceptance needs, demographics and culture. Further, the study investigates CEO transformational and transactional leadership behaviours rather than global constructs, and directly addresses the common method variance issue.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

James C. Sarros, Brian K. Cooper and Joseph C. Santora

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among leadership vision, organizational culture, and support for innovation in not‐for‐profit (NFP) and FP…

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14347

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among leadership vision, organizational culture, and support for innovation in not‐for‐profit (NFP) and FP organizations. It hypothesizes that in NFPs, a socially responsible cultural orientation mediates the relationship between leadership vision and organizational support for innovation, whereas in FPs, a competitive cultural orientation mediates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an empirical study that draws upon a large survey of 1,448 managers and senior executives who are members of the Australian Institute of Management.

Findings

Path analytic modelling provides partial support for the hypotheses. Although the predicted mediation effects occurred in NFPs and FPs, the strength of relationship between leadership vision and the two dimensions of organizational culture did not differ between the sectors. This was despite the observation that NFPs scored higher on a socially responsible cultural orientation than FPs, whereas FPs scored higher on a competitive cultural orientation.

Practical implications

Strategies for building innovative and sustainable organizations in the NFP sector are discussed on the basis of these findings.

Originality/value

The paper describes the first study in Australia that compares the responses of NFP and FP managers on leadership and related constructs, and provides evidence of the impact of organizational culture on leadership and innovation in these two sectors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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