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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Isaac Doku, John Akuma and John Owusu-Afriyie

This study aims to examine the quantitative effect and direction of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on economic growth in Africa using a sample of 20 African…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the quantitative effect and direction of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on economic growth in Africa using a sample of 20 African countries from 2003 to 2012 with data obtained from United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and the World Bank.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used panel least squares regression, specifically fixed effect model to examine the quantitative effect of Chinese FDI on economic growth in Africa. The study also used Granger causality test to examine whether a causal relationship exists between economic growth and China’s FDI in Africa.

Findings

The study finds that a 1 per cent increase in China’s FDI stock in Africa significantly increases Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth by 0.607 per cent, all things being equal. Furthermore, the study finds that a causal link exists between GDP growth in Africa and China’s FDI and the nature of causality is unidirectional.

Practical implications

The study recommends that to stimulate Chinese FDI in Africa, free visas must be given to Chinese investors coming into the continent, low tariffs should be imposed on inputs and intermediate goods from China and grant of business operation permit to Chinese investors must be made less bureaucratic.

Originality/value

This research has not been presented to any journal for publication and is originally written by the authors.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Kofi Kamasa, Isaac Mochiah, Andrews Kingsley Doku and Priscilla Forson

This paper aims to empirically investigate the impact that financial sector reforms have on foreign direct investment (FDI) in Ghana.

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1513

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically investigate the impact that financial sector reforms have on foreign direct investment (FDI) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Composite financial sector reform index was constructed, which was made up of various forms of reform policies that were implemented from 1987 to 2016. The auto regressive distributed lag bounds test was used to establish cointegration between variables. Having controlled for other covariates that affect FDI such as trade openness, exchange rate, gross domestic product per capita, inflation and by using the fully modified ordinary least squares method, the estimations are robust as it uses a semi-parametric correction to avoid for any possible issues of endogeneity and serial correlation.

Findings

Results from the paper reveal that financial sector reform deepening boost FDI with a 2.167% increase in FDI following from a unit percentage improvement of the financial sector reforms. Considering the various categories of reforms, the results reveal that competitive reforms have the highest impact on FDI followed by privatization reforms with positive and significant elasticity coefficients of 2.174% and 0.726%, respectively. Behavioral reforms revealed a positive effect on FDI, albeit insignificant.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to policy by providing empirical evidence on the effect of financial sector reform on FDI inflows in Ghana. As far as the review of literature is concerned, this paper provides the foremost empirical evidence on the subject with sole emphasis on Ghana. Thus, this paper suggests the deepening of the financial sector reforms, improving competition and maintaining macroeconomic stability.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Thomas Fischer and Heike Neuroth

Project SSG‐FI at the Lower Saxony State and University Library, Göttingen (Germany) provides special subject gateways to international high quality Internet resources for…

Abstract

Project SSG‐FI at the Lower Saxony State and University Library, Göttingen (Germany) provides special subject gateways to international high quality Internet resources for scientific users. Internet sites are selected by subject specialists and described using an extension of qualified Dublin Core metadata. A basic evaluation is added. These descriptions are freely available and can be searched and browsed. There are now subject gateways for three subject areas: earth sciences (Geo‐guide); mathematics (Mathguide); and Anglo‐American culture (split into History guide and Anglistik guide). Together they receive about 3,300 “hard” requests per day, thus reaching over 1 million requests per year. The project SSG‐FI behind these guides is open to collaboration. Institutions and private persons wishing to contribute can notify the SSG‐FI team or send full data sets. Regular contributors can request registration with the project to access the database via the Internet and create and edit records.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1961

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked *, which may be consulted in the Library.

Abstract

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked *, which may be consulted in the Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 13 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Henry Gyarteng-Mensah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David Edwards, Isaac Baidoo and Hatem El-Gohary

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-Institute of Distance Learning, Ghana and also rank the attributes of a job they deem important.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a positivist epistemological design contextualised within a deductive approach and case study strategy. Primary survey data was collected from a stratified random sample of 128 postgraduate students with multi-sectorial career prospects. Sample students were subjected to a DCE in which their stated preferences were collected using closed-ended questionnaires with 28 pairs of hypothetical job profiles. Respondents’ preferences from the DCE data were then modelled using the conditional logit.

Findings

The research reveals that: salary in the range GHC 2,800.00 to GHC 3,400.00 ($1 = GHS 5.3); supportive management; very challenging jobs; and jobs located in the city were the top attributes that were significant and had the most impact in increasing the utility of selecting a particular job. Interestingly, jobs with no extra hours workload were not significant hence, had a negative impact upon student preferences.

Originality/value

This novel research is the first to use a DCE to better elicit preference and trade-offs of postgraduate students in a developing country towards varying job characteristics that have an impact on their future employment decisions. Knowledge advancements made provide invaluable insight to employers and policymakers on the key criteria that should be implemented to retain the best candidate.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Isaac Akomea-Frimpong, Xiaohua Jin, Robert Osei-Kyei and Augustine Senanu Kukah

The contribution of the public–private partnership (PPP) model towards the achievement of the United Nation (UN)'s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been widely…

Abstract

Purpose

The contribution of the public–private partnership (PPP) model towards the achievement of the United Nation (UN)'s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been widely acknowledged. However, limited studies have shed light on the connection between PPPs and the achievement of these coveted goals in Ghana. In this study, the authors aimed at analysing and synthesising the existing literature on the use of PPP to achieve sustainability in infrastructure projects in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-step approach was used to retrieve and review 60 selected articles aided by content analysis.

Findings

The analysis showed that all existing relevant publications on the application of the PPP model to attain UN’s SDGs in the country are organised around dominant themes, such as poverty alleviation, urban development, waste management and risk management. However, the review revealed little studies exist on pertinent issues relating to PPPs and sustainable development goals, such as climate action, critical resilience, sustainable finance and clean energy.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study is limited to 60 articles in Ghana, the results reveal pertinent gaps for further research studies to achieve sustainable infrastructural development in Ghana and other countries.

Practical implications

Holistically, the outcome of this study will serve as a guide to project managers to understand essential issues on attaining sustainability on public projects.

Originality/value

This article contributes to the literature and practice on the significance of PPP in mainstreaming UN's SDGs in public infrastructure projects.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Chunqiu Li and Shigeo Sugimoto

Provenance information is crucial for consistent maintenance of metadata schemas over time. The purpose of this paper is to propose a provenance model named DSP-PROV to…

Abstract

Purpose

Provenance information is crucial for consistent maintenance of metadata schemas over time. The purpose of this paper is to propose a provenance model named DSP-PROV to keep track of structural changes of metadata schemas.

Design/methodology/approach

The DSP-PROV model is developed through applying the general provenance description standard PROV of the World Wide Web Consortium to the Dublin Core Application Profile. Metadata Application Profile of Digital Public Library of America is selected as a case study to apply the DSP-PROV model. Finally, this paper evaluates the proposed model by comparison between formal provenance description in DSP-PROV and semi-formal change log description in English.

Findings

Formal provenance description in the DSP-PROV model has advantages over semi-formal provenance description in English to keep metadata schemas consistent over time.

Research limitations/implications

The DSP-PROV model is applicable to keep track of the structural changes of metadata schema over time. Provenance description of other features of metadata schema such as vocabulary and encoding syntax are not covered.

Originality/value

This study proposes a simple model for provenance description of structural features of metadata schemas based on a few standards widely accepted on the Web and shows the advantage of the proposed model to conventional semi-formal provenance description.

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