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Article

Paul Lyons

This paper serves several purposes. It provides a brief exposition on the general definitions and features of skills and competence in organizations, presents an overview…

Abstract

This paper serves several purposes. It provides a brief exposition on the general definitions and features of skills and competence in organizations, presents an overview of skill charting, offers specific methods to demonstrate training for skill development using constructivist approaches (skill charting/competency mapping); and then presents the results of a brief study that encompasses the approaches discussed. The findings of the study indicate that the skill charting methods have value, promise, and that they require further study.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part

Katty Marmenout and Muriel Mignerat

This chapter explains how HR executives can leverage social network understanding in order to facilitate post-merger integration. We describe two social network mechanisms…

Abstract

This chapter explains how HR executives can leverage social network understanding in order to facilitate post-merger integration. We describe two social network mechanisms (brokerage and contagion) and explain their effect on organizational functioning. We then present a framework incorporating interventions in three core areas of HR involvement in mergers and map those interventions on the timeline of the merger so as to provide a roadmap for developing and implementing interventions based on social network insight. We argue that an understanding of social networks and the proposed interventions would allow HR executives to better monitor and steer post-merger integration.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-090-6

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Article

Christine Wee, Trixie Mottershead, Sarah Wright, Sujeet Jaydeokar and Mahesh Odiyoor

This paper aims to improve community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism. Lack of coordination between agencies leads to children and young…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism. Lack of coordination between agencies leads to children and young people with the most complex needs falling between services. The North West Operational Delivery Network (ODN) for learning disability and autism set out to develop a model of care for mental health services for children and young people with ID and/or autism in North West England that would improve coordination between services and lead to better community care.

Design/methodology/approach

The ODN held a series of good practice events and consultations with stakeholders in North West England to look at gaps in service provision, national guidelines and agree on a pathway for services.

Findings

The ODN decided to use the THRIVE framework as the basis for a specific model of care. Interventions were mapped against the THRIVE groupings, including pathways and team specifications for assessment and support for children with autism, and models for child and adolescent mental health service support for ID and/or autism, for keeping children and young people with behaviour that challenges in the community and transition.

Originality/value

This model aims to provide the North West England region with a clear multi-agency approach for supporting the needs of this population and supports multi-agency commissioning, gap analysis, earlier intervention and improving health outcomes for this population.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article

Alexandria Macmadu, Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Ian Gonsher, Jennifer G. Clarke and Bradley W. Brockmann

The purpose of this paper is to describe the course, “Designing Education for Better Prisoner and Community Health,” which provided students with the knowledge, skills and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the course, “Designing Education for Better Prisoner and Community Health,” which provided students with the knowledge, skills and resources needed to build real-world health education materials for persons who are criminal justice involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiphase engaged scholarship course was designed and implemented through the Brown University School of Public Health in Rhode Island, USA.

Findings

Students collaborated closely with instructors, subject matter experts and affected community members to develop highly tailored health education projects across six topic areas. The structure and outcomes of the paper are described with the hope that other instructors and institutions might replicate components of the model.

Originality/value

Engaged scholarship in public health can provide students with rich, collaborative learning experiences, and when executed effectively, these endeavors can provide underserved communities with robust and informed health education interventions and programs.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Content available
Article

Bart Penders

The purpose of this paper is to critically engage with societal origins of public (dis)trust and public credibility of nutrition science and offer suggestions for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically engage with societal origins of public (dis)trust and public credibility of nutrition science and offer suggestions for addressing its public dismissal.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint presents a conceptual analysis of public dismissal of nutrition science, drawing together perspectives on the relationships between science and society from the history, sociology and philosophy of science.

Findings

The origin of trust amongst scientists relies is actively tied to their social and moral status and science as a cultural activity is inextricably linked to institutions of power. Accordingly, trust in science relies heavily on public perceptions of those institutions, the ways in which citizens feel represented by them, and to what extent citizens consider these institutions to be held accountable. Ignoring this origin leads to expectations of science and scientists they cannot live up to and inevitable disappointment in those holding such expectations.

Social implications

Managing responsible expectations asks that we first dismiss dominant portrayals of science as pure, neutral, value-free and fuelled by curiosity. Second, we should pursue a reorganisation of science, favouring social inclusiveness over scientific exceptionalism.

Originality/value

Post-truth dynamics are a source of concern in the dissemination of nutrition science. Rather than dismissing it as a consequence of public ignorance, a comprehensive engagement with post-truth arguments allows a constructive repositioning of nutrition science organisation and communication. It asks that we design research programmes and studies differently, incorporate different voices. Above all else, it asks humility of researchers and tolerant approaches to other perspectives.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Gerjo Kok

Mental health promotion can learn from achievements in the field of health education and promotion. Health education and promotion has seen four major developments in the…

Abstract

Mental health promotion can learn from achievements in the field of health education and promotion. Health education and promotion has seen four major developments in the last decades: the need for planning, the need for evaluation, the behaviour‐environment issue, and the use of theory. A recently presented protocol for developing theory‐based and evidence‐based interventions, Intervention Mapping, is described here in more detail. Implementation is prominent in planning models and intervention protocols. The same expertise and professionalism that we put into the development of health promotion interventions for our target groups should be put into implementation interventions for programme users and decision‐makers.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article

E. Reinaerts, J. De Nooijer and N.K. De Vries

The purpose of this paper is to show how the intervention mapping (IM) protocol could be applied to the development of two school‐based interventions. It provides an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the intervention mapping (IM) protocol could be applied to the development of two school‐based interventions. It provides an extensive description of the development, implementation and evaluation of two interventions which aimed to increase fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption among primary school children.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how information drawn from relevant literature and theory, as well as additional data collected from primary school children, their parents and teachers, were applied to the development, implementation and evaluation of the interventions. The IM protocol consists of five steps: defining proximal program objectives; applying methods and strategies for behavioural change; creating a program plan; preparing program implementation; and evaluation. An extensive assessment of the perceived health problem was conducted prior to beginning step 1 of IM.

Findings

Application of the protocol resulted in two school‐based interventions aimed at making F&V consumption habitual: a free F&V distribution program; and a multi‐component, age‐specific program consisting of a classroom curriculum and parental involvement.

Practical implications

The matrices presented can provide health educators with a foundation for the development of future dietary interventions for children.

Originality/value

By providing a detailed description of the application of the IM, it was shown that the protocol can be used as a practical aid for the development of planned health promotion interventions. It proved to be an effective means for making well‐considered choices in every step of program development and implementation.

Details

Health Education, vol. 108 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article

Lyne M.G. Blanchette, Vivian M. van de Gaar, Hein Raat, Jeff French and Wilma Jansen

This paper aims to present a description of the development and implementation of a combined school- and community-based intervention for the prevention of overweight…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a description of the development and implementation of a combined school- and community-based intervention for the prevention of overweight among children, using the combined methods of social marketing (SMk) and intervention mapping (IM).

Design/methodology/approach

The SMk total process planning (TPP) framework was used, a simple but robust framework that consists of five stages: scoping, development, implementation, evaluation and follow-up. In addition, IM tools were embedded in the development stage to strengthen the development element of the campaign.

Findings

The use of the SMk TPP framework led to the selection of one specific target segment and behaviour. IM tools helped to select the most important and modifiable determinants and behaviours in the target segment, as well as to select and appropriately apply theoretical methods for influencing determinant and behaviour change. The resulting “Water Campaign” was aimed at Turkish and Moroccan mothers and their 6-12-year-old-children (target segment). This intervention addresses the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages through the promotion of tap water drinking (target behaviour). The systematic involvement of key stakeholders resulted in capacity-building and co-creation.

Originality/value

A key finding of the present work is that the SMk TPP framework and IM tools can be successfully combined in intervention development, helping to develop enhanced interventions. Combining these methods led to a theory-based and client-oriented intervention, which was directed at multiple ecological levels and which systematically involved key stakeholders. With this detailed description of the intervention development, this paper aims to assist other researchers and practitioners in their quest to develop better interventions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article

Birte Dohnke, Tanja Dewitt and Amina Steinhilber

Unhealthy eating among adolescents from families with lower social status is a major concern. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a…

Abstract

Purpose

Unhealthy eating among adolescents from families with lower social status is a major concern. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a prototype-targeting intervention for the promotion of healthy eating in this target group.

Design/methodology/approach

The planning model intervention mapping (IM) was chosen to proceed systematically, to use theory and evidence herein and to make decisions transparent. A controlled study with three times of data assessment was conducted to evaluate process characteristics and effects (N=108).

Findings

“Provide opportunities for social comparison” (behavioural change technique 6.2) was chosen as change method and “perceived similarity” was identified as the condition for its effectiveness. An intervention unit was designed for application. The evaluation results show the feasibility of the unit; materials and activities successfully applied the change method and its condition for effectiveness; and intervention objectives were generally achieved.

Practical implications

A prototype-targeting intervention is provided that is based on theory and evidence, and is suitable for implementation. More generally, the paper can serve as a blueprint for the systematic planning of theory- and evidence-based interventions targeting specific personal determinants for behaviour change.

Originality/value

The paper makes an important contribution to the application of the prototype-related theory and a useful addition of IM to the growing field of intervention development and design.

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Book part

Kelley S. Regan, Thomas E. Scruggs and Margo A. Mastropieri

This chapter provides a descriptive review of recent intervention research practices intended to improve the literacy skills of students with emotional or behavioral…

Abstract

This chapter provides a descriptive review of recent intervention research practices intended to improve the literacy skills of students with emotional or behavioral disabilities (EBD). A systematic search procedure identified 21 investigations that had been published in the past five years. These studies are described within the categories of peer-mediated literacy interventions, reading interventions, and writing interventions. Generally, it has been found that such practices as peer mediation, direct instruction (DI), cognitive text mapping, and writing strategy instruction including the Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model have led to substantial improvement in the literacy skills of students with EBD. These strategies were apparently successful because they served generally to focus student attention and to provide cognitive models for executing literacy tasks. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

Details

Policy and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-311-8

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