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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Julia Anwar-McHenry, Catherine F. Drane, Phoebe Joyce and Robert J. Donovan

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily…

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Abstract

Purpose

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily targeting student mental health, but it is also intended for staff. This paper presents the results of an impact survey on staff after the implementation of the Framework in a number of schools in Western Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A baseline questionnaire was completed by n = 87 staff at schools that had just signed up to the programme, and a participant questionnaire was completed by n = 146 staff at schools that had been participating for at least 17 months.

Findings

The results show that the Framework has had a substantial impact on many staff in terms of increased mental health literacy and taking action to improve their mental health.

Originality/value

Mental health interventions in schools generally focus on students' well-being and how to deal with student mental health problems. There are few comprehensive interventions that also include staff well-being.

Details

Health Education, vol. 120 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

David M. Ndetei and Patrick Gatonga

The aim of this paper is to review the history of mental health service improvement in Kenya, to discuss current provision of services, challenges to the provision of…

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602

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to review the history of mental health service improvement in Kenya, to discuss current provision of services, challenges to the provision of services and future needs for services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

Mental health care in Kenya has been a progressing field, though the momentum of progress has been less than desired. The reasons for this are complex including a lack of evidence of the size of the mental health burden which has undermined the political will to focus scarce resources in this area, lack of human resources, models of prevention, and robust mental health legislation. Traditional healers have a significant place in mental health care, these plus efforts to increase training on mental health, task shifting for other clinicians and also prevention may be important steps in improving access to care.

Research limitations/implications

The review highlights how much remains to be done to improve mental health services in Kenya. It demonstrates the need for good epidemiological and intervention data to support a multi‐level approach, involving government, non‐governmental organizations, communities, families, affected individuals and other stakeholders. Prevention and treatment strategies should be streamlined and emphasis put on stigma reduction as well as provision of accessible, acceptable, sustainable and affordable care.

Practical implications

A review of the literature is useful to highlight what is known but also what information is missing and is needed to go forward.

Originality/value

This is the first system level historical review of the development of mental health services in Kenya. It offers a model for investigation that may be useful for others.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

A. Fraser

Mental illness affects the majority of prisoners. Mental health issues are beginning to take a central position in the development of prison health services, reflecting…

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478

Abstract

Mental illness affects the majority of prisoners. Mental health issues are beginning to take a central position in the development of prison health services, reflecting this burden of disease. This change in focus is not before time. But prison mental health services cannot exist in isolation. Public health systems should lead provision of care for patients with acute and severe illness. A whole prison approach to health and, specifically, mental health will offer the greatest likelihood that offenders will thrive, benefit from imprisonment, and lead law‐abiding lives after release. Public awareness of the scale and commitment of prisons to mental health and illness, and understanding of prisons’ role in society, are necessary developments that would protect and enhance public mental health, as well as creating a healthier and safer society. This article draws on recent reviews, information and statements to set out a public health agenda for mental health in prisons.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jenny Bywaters

Although public mental health has rarely been an explicit element of national health policy in England, a range of programmes have contributed to moving it up the agenda…

Abstract

Although public mental health has rarely been an explicit element of national health policy in England, a range of programmes have contributed to moving it up the agenda. There is a growing movement for recognition of the potential benefits of a population‐wide approach to promoting mental health and well‐being. This paper describes work streams developed since 1997, under the current government, and outlines opportunities for the future.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Tanja Kamin

Slovenia regained its independence in 1991, and in 2004 became a member of the European Union. Despite some progress in public health policy and practice, mental health

Abstract

Slovenia regained its independence in 1991, and in 2004 became a member of the European Union. Despite some progress in public health policy and practice, mental health has so far barely featured. Mental health literacy is poor, mental health services remain firmly rooted in the medical, institutional model, and public attitudes to mental ill health are predominantly negative. But Tanja Kamin here identifies some key opportunities that may lead to a greater emphasis on prevention of mental ill health and promotion of mental well‐being across the whole population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Jed Boardman and Michael Parsonage

It is nearly eight years since the National Service Framework for Mental Health was published, setting ambitious 10‐year targets. This article draws on findings presented…

Abstract

It is nearly eight years since the National Service Framework for Mental Health was published, setting ambitious 10‐year targets. This article draws on findings presented in a recent Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health report on progress to date. It concludes that although the framework confirmed the status of mental health as a health priority for the government, a likely shortfall in funding means that goals will not be met in full. The authors stress that this is not a criticism of policy; rather it reflects the ambitious nature of the government's mental health agenda.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Estelle Matilda Appiah

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182

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Naomi Russell and Jennifer Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon research into the nature and effects of mental health stigma and discrimination on young people and also outlines the strategy of the Time to Change campaign and its initial outcomes.

Findings

The paper includes testimonies from young people with lived experience of mental health problems about the stigma and discrimination they have faced. It also outlines the aims, objectives and stages of implementation of the Time to Change Children and Young People's Programme. The paper particularly focuses on the campaign work undertaken in secondary schools, the social leadership programme for young people with lived experience of mental health problems and the process of designing effective campaign messaging for social media.

Originality/value

Time to Change is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health. This paper provides a unique insight into the process of developing and rolling out an anti-stigma campaign for young people.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Sophie Corlett

The Policy Watch series reflects on recent and forthcoming developments in mental health policy across the UK. This paper aims to review recent developments in mental

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361

Abstract

Purpose

The Policy Watch series reflects on recent and forthcoming developments in mental health policy across the UK. This paper aims to review recent developments in mental health policy including the mental health implementation framework, draft Mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board, and proposals on shared decision making and integration of social and health care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews and summarizes recent developments in national mental health policy in England and their implications for mental health service provision.

Findings

The paper outlines several developments which contribute towards the realisation of the mental health strategy, No Health Without Mental Health.

Originality/value

The paper updates and discusses knowledge on recent and forthcoming mental health policy initiatives and cites recent evidence from Mind.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Rachel Jenkins

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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