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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Audrey Anthoney, Josephine M. Royle and Ian M. Johnson

Reports the results of the first stage of research (in progress, 1997‐2000), which aims to develop an understanding of the challenges facing publishers who have entered…

Abstract

Reports the results of the first stage of research (in progress, 1997‐2000), which aims to develop an understanding of the challenges facing publishers who have entered the children’s multimedia market in the UK in the 1980s and 1990s. The findings of the first stage of the research amongst established UK publishers producing multimedia for children are described. These point to a number of factors that appear to be critical to the success of publishers in the multimedia market: modification of corporate culture, internal structures and processes; branding of the company’s chosen multimedia identity; focusing on the added value element of multimedia products; promotion of organisational learning, innovation and creativity within the company; and sourcing necessary skills effectively. A second study will examine the perceptions of new media companies which have entered this market.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Ian M. Johnson

This paper considers the impact of the emerging “information society” on the education and development of information professionals, particularly in the area of…

Abstract

This paper considers the impact of the emerging “information society” on the education and development of information professionals, particularly in the area of management. It identifies those features of the “information society” which are significant for teaching and learning: the new information and communication technologies; users’ growing expectations of information services; the changing job market; and convergence in the information sector. It outlines some steps which schools of library and information sciences in the UK have taken to respond to the challenges presented by the new environment: revising the existing curriculum and teaching methods; expanding the range of curricula; and improved support for continuing professional development. It describes some obstacles to progress: particularly the lack of research into the value of information; isolation from other disciplines, such as political science; potential challenges from business schools; and the shortcomings of current distance learning provision.Introduction

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Ian M. Johnson

This paper aims to review traditional forms of international support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences, and traditional approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review traditional forms of international support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences, and traditional approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The review draws evidence from the literature and the author's extensive international experience.

Findings

The study notes that the traditional approaches have not been entirely successful, and that the sources of support for these approaches are changing. In the light of the growth in the number of schools in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, it suggests that traditional approaches may not be practicable. Alternative approaches suggested in the past have included making teaching materials available, including access to them over the internet, but these may be no more appropriate or practicable. The paper then draws on recent research into the emergence of electronic publishing in Latin America. Whilst there are still flaws in the electronic publishing system, it may suggest a possible new way forward.

Practical implications

The challenge now is to determine how to facilitate similar support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences internationally.

Originality/value

The paper challenges orthodox thinking about support for new schools of librarianship and information sciences in developing countries, and invites consideration of how new communications media could play a part in this process.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Ian M. Johnson and Susan M. Copeland

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of OpenAIR, the institutional repository at the Robert Gordon University.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of OpenAIR, the institutional repository at the Robert Gordon University.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the principles that underpinned the development of the repository (visibility, sustainability, quality, and findability) and some of the technical and financial implications that were considered.

Findings

OpenAIR@RGU evolved from a desire to make available an electronic collection of PhD theses, but was developed to become a means of storing and providing access to a range of research output produced by staff and research students: book chapters, journal articles, reports, conference publications, theses, artworks, and datasets.

Originality/value

The paper describes the repository's contribution to collection development.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Ian M. Johnson

This paper identifies six major challenges facing the information profession as the “information society” emerges: assisting users to deal with information overload; the…

Abstract

This paper identifies six major challenges facing the information profession as the “information society” emerges: assisting users to deal with information overload; the high level of technical skills required to manage the new information and communication technologies; the competition with other professions for the management positions in converged library, information, and computing services; the need to incorporate a broader range of knowledge and skills, drawn from those traditionally seen as separate sectors of the information industry such as publishing; the need to develop a higher level of skills in teaching and facilitating the use of information; and the need for a greater ability to work with other people. It points to some solutions which have been adopted by schools of librarianship in the UK, many of them involving collaboration with other disciplines to produce the required depth of knowledge. It also calls for changes in the schools’ approach to teaching, learning, and research, and in the practitioner community’s support for education in general and continuing professional development in particular. Finally, it points to the dangers of inertia.

Details

Library Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Ian M. Johnson

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Ian M. Johnson

This paper points to the challenges arising from the emergency of the “information society”: the high level of skills required to take full advantage of the new…

Abstract

This paper points to the challenges arising from the emergency of the “information society”: the high level of skills required to take full advantage of the new information and communication technologies, and their expanding information content; a greater awareness of information and its potential contribution to all aspects of life; and the social and political challenges of ensuring equality in information provision. It considers the need for information professionals to have a greater commitment to user empowerment; a higher level of skills in facilitating the use of information; and a more visible and effective presence in the “political” arena. It discusses some solutions which have been adopted by schools of librarianship in the UK to help students acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and enthusiasm, and some of the outstanding areas for development: broader perspectives in the context of information work, and the encouragement of continuing professional development.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Ian M. Johnson

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ian M. Johnson, Dorothy A. Williams, Caroline Wavell and Graeme Baxter

This paper examines the relationship between research into the evaluation of the impact of library and information services, policy making in the field, and professional…

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between research into the evaluation of the impact of library and information services, policy making in the field, and professional practice and education. The paper first summarises the background to a recent critical literature review undertaken on behalf of Resource: the Council on Museums, Archives and Libraries. The review was intended to identify any published evidence that Museums, Archives and Libraries are making a contributory impact to developments in the British Government’s key policy areas. Except in the field of learning, little supporting evidence was found. Methodological weakness undermined the validity of much of the related work identified by the review. After considering approaches to ensuring the impact of research on policy making, including a more appropriate publication strategy and greater face‐to‐face dialogue, the paper discusses the attitudes of LIS practitioners towards academic research and the need for closer collaboration. Finally, the paper speculates on some of the implications for LIS educators in developing future researchers better equipped to identify the contribution that libraries make, and more effective in influencing policy makers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 105 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Ian M. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of a project in Latin American university libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of a project in Latin American university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes meetings, focus groups, and shared experiences.

Findings

Guidelines on institutional repositories have been published, and others are expected to appear shortly on information literacy and digital reference.

Research limitations/implications

This work was based on experience, rather than objective assessment.

Practical implications

The guidelines are intended to win the support of university managers as well as their librarians, and tend therefore to be non‐technical.

Originality/value

If implemented, these guidelines will enhance the standing of university libraries in the region, as well as raise the level of professional practice and the contribution of university libraries to social and economic development.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 24 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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