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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Lorena Ronda, Andrea Ollo-López and Salomé Goñi-Legaz

This paper aims to establish to what extent family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices are positively related to work–family balance and to identify the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish to what extent family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices are positively related to work–family balance and to identify the role played by job satisfaction and working hours as mediators of this relationship

Design/methodology/approach

We use data for a representative sample of almost 17,000 employees of dual-earner couples from European countries. To test the mediation mechanism implied by our hypotheses, we follow the procedure outlined in Baron and Kenny (1986). Given the nature of the dependent variables, ordered probit and regression models were estimated in the analysis.

Findings

The results show that, in general, family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices increase work–family balance and that these positive relationships are partially mediated by job satisfaction and working hours. While both family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices increase job satisfaction, only the first increase working hours. Moreover, job satisfaction increases work–family balance, while working hours reduces it. The net effect of these opposing forces on work–family balance is positive.

Research limitations/implications

The use of secondary data posits some constraints, such as the type of measures and the failure to control for a higher number of family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices. Additionally, the non-longitudinal nature of the data set implies that some relationships cannot be considered causal in the intended direction.

Practical implications

Managers should implement family-friendly practices and high-performance work practices, as, in general, they increase work–family balance. A significant portion of this positive effect is channeled through job satisfaction and working hours.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to understanding the relationship between different subsets of human-resources management practices and work–family balance, proposing a model that aims to disentangle the mediating mechanisms through which this relationship occurs.

Details

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Anthea Zacharatos, M. Sandy Hershcovis, Nick Turner and Julian Barling

This article aims to provide a quantitative review of the range and effects of human resource management (HRM) practices in the North American automotive industry.

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5438

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide a quantitative review of the range and effects of human resource management (HRM) practices in the North American automotive industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 14 studies provided data for an employee‐level meta‐analysis of the relationships comprising high performance work systems in the automotive manufacturing sector. As an extension of research in this context, we hypothesized that three clusters of organizational practices (work systems, HR policies, and leadership) would be associated with two clusters of employee‐level psychosocial outcomes (person‐focused, organizational‐focused) which, in turn, would be related to employee performance.

Findings

It was found that work systems and HR policies related to both person‐focused (comprising individual job satisfaction, health, self‐esteem, and social support) and organization‐focused (comprising organizational commitment and perceptions of organizational justice) outcomes. The leadership cluster had a strong association with the person‐focused outcomes. Organizational – but not personal‐focused outcomes were associated with employee performance comprising employee effectiveness, self‐ratings of performance, turnover, and absenteeism.

Research limitations/implications

The results from this study provide support for the role of employee‐level psychosocial outcomes as mechanisms between HRM practices and employee performance, supporting an idea that is often discussed but rarely tested in the literature. These results need to tempered by the fact that this meta‐analysis was based on a relatively small number of studies in one industrial sector, thereby limiting the generalizability of the model.

Practical implications

These data suggest that managing with a high‐involvement orientation is associated with positive consequences for individuals and organizations within the automotive industry. The paper is not espousing the view that technologically‐focused systems are of little value in manufacturing industries, but rather that taking a more humanistic approach to how they are implemented may benefit all parties involved.

Originality/value

This paper provides an empirical review of HRM practices and outcomes in the automotive manufacturing context. The role of leadership in these systems is highlighted. The results offer guidance to researchers and practitioners interested in researching and managing the human side of automobile manufacturing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Deybbi Cuéllar-Molina, Antonia Mercedes García-Cabrera and Ma de la Cruz Déniz-Déniz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the emotional intelligence (EI) of the person in charge of making human resource management (HRM) decisions on the…

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8877

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the emotional intelligence (EI) of the person in charge of making human resource management (HRM) decisions on the adoption of high-performance human resource (HR) practices in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes evidences from 157 HR decision makers in SMEs who autonomously make the decisions in the HR area and were responsible for the HR practices in their firm. The authors used multiple linear regression analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that both the EI and the different EI competencies of which it is comprised affect the adoption of various HR practices. Thus, the main theoretical contribution of this work stems from the incorporation of a psychological variable (EI) as an antecedent of HRM. Managers of the SME will find guidance about which emotional competencies are the most important for them to be more successful in their roles and for improving HRM.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample of firms the authors studied is limited to a specific geographic area in one country – Spain (Canary Islands) – that will necessarily limit generalisation of the results obtained to other populations of SMEs. Researchers should replicate the current model in other geographic areas. Second, and with regard the methodology, researchers could explore other tools to measure EI and emotional competencies. It would be interesting to measure this construct using qualitative analytical techniques, with 360 – or 180 – degree tools. Finally, the current study is cross-sectional in nature, which limits our ability to draw causal inferences from the data. This cross-sectional design prevents us, for example, from analysing EI’s influence on the continued development of high-performance HR practices over time. Future research using longitudinal methodologies to study these variables could provide additional advances in this area. This work makes important contributions to both the literature and the business world. With regard to the theoretical implications, results confirm that EI as a whole, as well as in terms of its specific emotional competencies, affects the decision making related to the adoption of high-performance HR practices, which is known to contribute to the organisational performance.

Practical implications

With regard its practical implications, SMEs’ owners-managers and HR practitioners may find our results and conclusions interesting. Indeed, recommendations in business management have often been accompanied by new approaches in HRM (Kent, 2005), as this study proposes. In particular, managers will find evidence of how a decision-maker’s higher EI propitiates the adoption of high-performance HR practices, thus being able to improve HRM in their SMEs. Moreover, managers will obtain guidance on which emotional competencies are the most important for adopting each HR practice, and so find greater success in their HRM roles. SMEs could organise programmes to develop the HR decision-maker’s emotional competencies, as large firms do for their executives.

Originality/value

Thus, the main theoretical contribution of this work stems from the incorporation of a psychological variable (EI) as an antecedent of HRM. Managers of the SME will find guidance about which emotional competencies are the most important for them to be more successful in their roles and for improving HRM.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8494

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Lars U. Johnson, Cody J. Bok, Tiffany Bisbey and L. A. Witt

Decision-making in human resources management is done at both the micro and macro level of organizations. Unfortunately, the decisions at each level are often executed…

Abstract

Decision-making in human resources management is done at both the micro and macro level of organizations. Unfortunately, the decisions at each level are often executed without consideration of the other, and current theory reflects this issue. In response to a call for integration of micro- and macro-level processes by Huselid and Becker (2011), we review the extant literature on strategic human resources and high-performance work systems to provide recommendations for both research and practice. We aimed to contribute to the literature by proposing the incorporation of the situation awareness literature into the high-performance work systems framework to encourage the alignment of human resources efforts. In addition, we provide practical recommendations for integrating situation awareness and strategic decision-making. We discuss a process for the employment of situation awareness in organizations that might not only streamline human resources management but also result in more effective decisions. Additional considerations include implications for teams, boundary conditions (e.g., individual differences), and measurement.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Jeevan Jyoti and Asha Rani

The purpose of this paper is to explore the high performance work system through ability, motivation and opportunity model (Jiang et al., 2013) and its impact on…

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2400

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the high performance work system through ability, motivation and opportunity model (Jiang et al., 2013) and its impact on organisational performance. Further, the mediating role of knowledge management between high performance work system and organisational performance has also been evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire technique has been used to collect the data from managers (n=58) and employees (n=246) working in telecommunication organisations in Jammu and Kashmir (North India). Data collected have been validated using the exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Hypotheses have been tested through structural equation modelling with the help of AMOS and SmartPLS3 softwares. Further, theoretical, managerial and socio-economic implications have also been discussed.

Findings

The study indicates that high performance work system positively affects organisational performance. Further, knowledge management act as a mediator between high performance work system and organisational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been conducted only in the private telecommunication sector (Airtel, Aircel, Tata Indicom, Idea, Reliance, Vodafone). Further, the study being limited to telecommunication sector can be extended in other sectors also.

Practical implications

In order to create superior work system, management should focus on ability-enhancing initiatives such as extensive job training, computer-based training, etc. on regular basis. Employees should be rewarded extrinsically as well as intrinsically to keep them motivated to achieve higher levels of performance. Further, management should empower the employees through decentralisation of authority, participative decision making, etc. Besides this, management should also instil the knowledge culture in the organisation in order to enhance the knowledge capability of the employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by identifying the black box using knowledge management to understand the relationship between high performance work system and organisational performance in the telecommunication sector.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Ashutosh Muduli and Gary N. McLean

Benchmarking research has explored the role of organizational practices and business processes rooted with human capabilities for achieving growth performance. The role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Benchmarking research has explored the role of organizational practices and business processes rooted with human capabilities for achieving growth performance. The role of high performance work system as an organizational practice and business process is yet to be studied. Even if studied, no study has been conducted on the role of training transfer climate on high performance work system and organizational performance. The current research aims at examining high performance work system on organizational performance. Further, the study also examine training transfer climate as a mediating variable between HPWS and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 415 executives of a high performance-based power sector company of Gujarat, India. The survey instrument consists of high performance work system, training transfer climate and organizational performance. Confirmatory factor analysis was used for a simultaneous assessment of overall and specific elements of measurement validity and reliability. Structural equation modelling used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

The result proved the capability of high performance work system to predict organizational performance. Further, the result supports the hypothesis that training transfer climate acts as a mediator between high performance work system and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The result has important theoretical and managerial implications. Theoretically, the research extends the scope of benchmarking to high performance work system. The managerial implications have been discussed from the training transfer climate perspectives.

Originality/value

The originality of the study lies with proving the role of high performance work system and training transfer climate as an organizational practice and business process within benchmarking research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Na Mao, Heyi Song and Ying Han

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between employee perspectives of high-performance work systems and employee outcomes, i.e. job satisfaction and…

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3654

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between employee perspectives of high-performance work systems and employee outcomes, i.e. job satisfaction and affective commitment, and to propose ways of increasing the positive effects of high-performance work systems on firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 370 employees in the Chinese manufacturing industry during 2010. The Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) method was used to test each of the eight hypotheses deriving from the conceptual framework.

Findings

The paper finds that: employee perspectives of high-performance work systems have a positive effect on both job satisfaction and affective commitment; and breadth of behavioural script and level of autonomy mediate the relationship between employee perspectives of high-performance work systems and their attitudes towards that organisation (job satisfaction and affective commitment); however, skill variety did not mediate the relationship between employee perspectives of high-performance work systems and employees’ attitudes in the data set used.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper suggest that managers can improve employees’ attitudes by integrating effective high-performance work systems in their working environment. Even more interestingly, it appears that by encouraging broad behavioural scripts or allowing employees more freedom to apply their skills, managers can improve employees’ attitudes more significantly than by encouraging employees to acquire a variety of skills.

Originality/value

Using signalling and psychological-contract theory, the paper shows the dominant influence of employees’ perceived high-performance work systems on employees’ attitudes via behavioural scripts and autonomy.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Kangyin Lu, Jinxia Zhu and Haijun Bao

Human resources have become a key issue in relation to the strong competition between service firms. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship…

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5403

Abstract

Purpose

Human resources have become a key issue in relation to the strong competition between service firms. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between high-performance human resource management (HRM) within this field to firm performance, making a useful attempt to explore the “black box” of enterprise human resources management effect on firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to validate the relationship between high-performance HRM and firm performance, Chinese service industry samples were collected. Structural equation modeling and regression are adopted to estimate the direct effect of high-performance HRM on firm performance and the mediating role of innovation.

Findings

The results show that the impacts of high-performance HRM on firm performance are significant. Moreover, innovation plays a partial mediating role between them. Training, work analysis and employee participation has a significantly positive impact on firm performance, while effects of profit sharing, employee development and performance evaluation on enterprise performance is not significant. The results strongly support the hypothesis that innovation holds intermediary variables between high-performance HRM and firm performance.

Practical implications

Studying the relationship between high-performance HRM and firm performance can help Chinese enterprises more reasonable and effective learning foreign advanced management ideas and methods. And then can help Chinese enterprises to establish a high-performance HRM system that is suitable for Chinese enterprises; the research can help enterprises to identify meaningful practice of human resources management, outstanding keys, and perfect the HRM system of enterprises; research on innovation and innovative thinking is conducive to develop employees’ innovation motive, promote employee’ innovative behavior, and improve firm performance.

Originality/value

This paper takes innovation as a mediating variable into the model and studies the intermediary role of innovation.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Kevin Murphy and Michael Olsen

The objective of this research is to conduct an exploratory study that will gain consensus among restaurant industry professionals, academics and outside industry experts…

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4408

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to conduct an exploratory study that will gain consensus among restaurant industry professionals, academics and outside industry experts on the set of work practice dimensions in a high performance management systems (HPMS) for restaurant managers in the US casual restaurant sector.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study method was employed that used a combination of data collection techniques: interviews for the pilot study, the Delphi method and secondary data collection. Restaurant experts were chosen to consider the components of an HPMS construct for unit management in the US casual restaurant business. Assumptions were made based on a review of strategic human resource management literature, then experts were interviewed and a Delphi was conducted to gain consensus.

Findings

The authors find thirteen dimensions of an HPMS, which are common to unit management in US casual restaurants. Three work practices that were not considered relevant dimensions to the casual restaurant industry were removed from the Delphi. This translates into a difference of seven work practices between a manufacturing work system and a restaurant work system, which are either excluded or included in a restaurant work system.

Originality/value

Previous strategic human resource management research has dubbed HR work practiceshigh performance work practices”. With few exceptions these studies have been conducted in contextual settings that do not possess similar operational characteristics to the restaurant service industry. That there are differences in the business models between these industries and hence in the work practices between them is apparent from the results. Additionally, this study was targeted to management in the restaurant industry, not overall employment as the other studies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Mansoor Ahmad and Matthew Allen

Despite a growing literature on human resource management (HRM) in emerging economies, evidence from Pakistan is limited. There is scant information on both the human…

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1846

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a growing literature on human resource management (HRM) in emerging economies, evidence from Pakistan is limited. There is scant information on both the human resource (HR) practices that indigenous workplaces adopt and their associations with HR-related outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap by examining whether universalistic assumptions about the applicability of “high-performance” HR practices are valid in Pakistan, a country with religious values and organizational traditions that differ to those in the west.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on the, to date, most comprehensive survey of indigenous establishments in Pakistan. The authors use logistic regressions to analyze the data.

Findings

Workplaces, in general, adopt several “high-performance” HR practices, such as extensive training, career breaks, rigorous pre-employment candidate assessment, and the sharing of strategic information with employees. Attitude surveys and the provision of training in a variety of jobs to non-managerial employees are consistently associated with better HR-related outcomes (absenteeism, quit rates, and labour productivity). Overall, the paper finds some limited support for the applicability and efficacy of high-performance HRM practices in Pakistan. Such practices conform to Islamic principles. The results also indicate, however, that cultural traits play a role in how those practices are implemented.

Social implications

Increased adoption of certain HR practices by establishments in Pakistan may help to improve the working conditions and employment prospects of employees and may also ameliorate the country’s sluggish economic growth rates.

Originality/value

HRM in Pakistani establishments has received relatively scant attention. Existing research either focuses on a relatively small number of firms, assesses HR in MNC subsidiaries, or examines a limited range of HR practices. Understanding the HR practices that are (and are not) adopted and their associations with performance outcomes will not just enhance the knowledge of HR in emerging economies, but will also provide insights into how to improve establishment performance and economic growth rates.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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