Search results

1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Henk J. Voorbij

In order to compare the value of subject descriptors and title keywords as entries to subject searches, two studies were carried out. Both studies concentrated on monographs in…

1204

Abstract

In order to compare the value of subject descriptors and title keywords as entries to subject searches, two studies were carried out. Both studies concentrated on monographs in the humanities and social sciences, held by the online public access catalogue of the National Library of the Netherlands. In the first study, a comparison was made by subject librarians between the subject descriptors and the title keywords of 475 records. They could express their opinion on a scale from 1 (descriptor is exactly or almost the same as word in title) to 7 (descriptor does not appear in title at all). It was concluded that 37 per cent of the records are considerably enhanced by a subject descriptor, and 49 per cent slightly or considerably enhanced. In the second study, subject librarians performed subject searches using title keywords and subject descriptors on the same topic. The relative recall amounted to 48 per cent and 86 per cent respectively. Failure analysis revealed the reasons why so many records that were found by subject descriptors were not found by title keywords. First, although completely meaningless titles hardly ever appear, the title of a publication does not always offer sufficient clues for title keyword searching. In those cases, descriptors may enhance the record of a publication. A second and even more important task of subject descriptors is controlling the vocabulary. Many relevant titles cannot be retrieved by title keyword searching because of the wide diversity of ways of expressing a topic. Descriptors take away the burden of vocabulary control from the user.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Henk Voorbij

The union catalogue of monographs published before 1976 is maintained by the Dutch National Library in card form and contains five to six million records from 95 libraries. The…

Abstract

The union catalogue of monographs published before 1976 is maintained by the Dutch National Library in card form and contains five to six million records from 95 libraries. The extent to which these records need to be converted into machine‐readable form depends on several factors. Does the holding library still exist? Does the holding library participate in the Pica shared cataloguing system and has it converted its own card catalogue? Did the holding library convert its card catalogue using another library system? Are the cards in the union catalogue still reliable or did the holding library discard volumes from its collection without notifying the National Library? A feasibility study showed that the holding data of 59 libraries could be removed without any further processing; this amounts to 72.6 per cent of the cards. For the remaining 27.4 per cent of the cards from 36 libraries, priorities for the retrospective conversion of their data in the union catalogue were determined.

Details

Program, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Henk Voorbij

The purpose of this paper is to determine the percentage of recently published books provided with tags drawn from LibraryThing for Libraries, the nature of these tags, the…

1804

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the percentage of recently published books provided with tags drawn from LibraryThing for Libraries, the nature of these tags, the relation of the tags with keywords in the record and the percentage of records actually enhanced by tags.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 600 records from a catalog of a large academic library was examined to determine whether or not they carry tags. A random sample of 160 records was taken to assess their nature and added value for retrieval purposes.

Findings

It was found that: about one third of the records are provided with tags; 80 percent of the tags are subject terms; 50 percent of the subject tags are covered by a keyword in the record; 25 percent are broader than a keyword and another 25 percent are related, narrower or new. Almost 40 percent of the records with tags can be considered as enriched.

Research limitations/implications

In some cases the determination of the added value required a subjective judgement. It was not examined whether the tags properly reflect the content of the book.

Originality/value

Unlike earlier studies, this study is based on a large and random sample. Tags are compared not only with subject headings, but also with other keywords and differences between disciplines are examined.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Henk Voorbij

This paper aims to describe some of the unique features of the Dutch academic library benchmarking system.

1197

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe some of the unique features of the Dutch academic library benchmarking system.

Design/methodology/approach

The Dutch system is compared with similar projects in the USA, the UK and Germany.

Findings

One of the most distinguishing features of the Dutch system is the method by which the results are analysed and presented. Absolute values of performance indicators are converted to median relative scores and, as a result, a graph can be created for each library that shows at a glance its relative position for a whole range of indicators.

Practical implications

Similar benchmarking projects may benefit from the Dutch experience regarding the selection of raw data, the choice of performance indicators, the validity of the performance indicators, methods for analysis and presentation, and interpretation of the results.

Originality/value

The paper provides detailed and critical information on a long‐running project. It questions the validity of some established performance indicators.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Henk Voorbij

One of the aims of the LIBER strategic plan 2009‐2012 was to stimulate the use of LibQUAL+ by European research libraries. The purpose of this study is to investigate how far this…

1004

Abstract

Purpose

One of the aims of the LIBER strategic plan 2009‐2012 was to stimulate the use of LibQUAL+ by European research libraries. The purpose of this study is to investigate how far this initiative has been successful.

Design/methodology/approach

All 385 LIBER libraries were invited to complete an online survey, mounted on Survey Monkey. The questionnaire was meant for all libraries, whether or not they performed a user survey during the last five years and, if so, whether or not they used LibQUAL + as the survey instrument.

Findings

The study shows that the use of LibQUAL+ in Europe is widespread and that there is a great potential for further growth. LibQUAL+'s strong areas are the ease of administering and opportunities for benchmarking. A weak area is the user unfriendliness: 50 per cent of the libraries having experience with LibQUAL+ find the survey difficult to complete for the participants. Carrying out a LibQUAL+ survey has great practical implications. More than 75 per cent of the respondents took measures to improve their performance on weak areas or to promote their existing services better among the user community. About one third established new services.

Practical implications

The results point at the need to improve the user friendliness of LibQUAL+.

Originality/value

This is the first study that covers the experience of European research libraries with LibQUAL+ on a broad scale.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Henk Voorbij

This paper aims to describe the use of web statistics by libraries, archives and museums in The Netherlands.

1250

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the use of web statistics by libraries, archives and museums in The Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

Three methods were applied: a survey among more than 100 institutions, interviews and content analysis of annual reports.

Findings

Most institutions gather web statistics. A large variety of packages is used, which hinders comparison among institutions. Web statistics are used for practical purposes, such as adapting the web site or setting priorities for further digitization, and as a critical success factor. Most archives and museums mention web statistics in their annual report. Usually, they do not explain the data and do not provide background information, which makes it difficult to interpret them.

Research limitations/implications

The sample represented institutions with above average interest in, or experience with, digitizing.

Practical implications

This inventory may stimulate large‐scale use of web statistics in cultural heritage institutions and be the first step towards standardization.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to investigate the use of web statistics in cultural heritage institutions in The Netherlands.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

227

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Steve Thornton

118

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Steve Thornton

413

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Abdul Mannan Khan and Naved Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to find out the level of awareness and use of e‐journals by the researchers of the Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) and the Banaras Hindu University…

2003

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the level of awareness and use of e‐journals by the researchers of the Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) and the Banaras Hindu University (BHU) – both central universities funded by the University Grants Commission.

Design/methodology/approach

A well‐structured questionnaire is administered to the research scholars of the AMU and BHU to collect data regarding the use of e‐journals.

Findings

The survey reveals that most of the research scholars are aware of the availability of e‐journals and largely use them for reference purposes in their research work. They fully agree that with the usage of e‐journal the quality of research work improves with enrichment of appurtenant contents and materials leading to high‐quality manuscript. It is however found that lack of training is the obstacle in proper and full utilization of e‐journals.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper consists only of e‐journal users and the geographical area is restricted to AMU, Aligarh and BHU, Varanasi. The scope of the paper can be extended to additional centrally funded universities. An intra‐comparative study could also be made between some select central and state universities for users of e‐journal.

Originality/value

There are a number of studies on the use of e‐journals, but this is the first of its kind within Indian central universities. As such, it should pave the way for research in other Indian universities as well as elsewhere.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

1 – 10 of 11