Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Steven Davies, Gareth Reginald Terrence White, Anthony Samuel and Helen Martin

Covid-19 has caused many businesses to rethink their short- and potentially long-term workforce operations. The use of lateral flow serology can provide a clinically…

Abstract

Purpose

Covid-19 has caused many businesses to rethink their short- and potentially long-term workforce operations. The use of lateral flow serology can provide a clinically convenient approach for the assessment of prior infection with Covid-19. However, its widespread adoption in organisations seeking to use it to test for workforce immunity is controversial and confusing. This paper aims to explore the paradoxical dilemmas and dialectics immunity workforce testing creates.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved capturing the ethnographical participation of a chief executive officer (CEO) dealing with the experience of managing the outcomes of Covid-19 workforce immunity testing. The aim was to take a snapshot in time of the CEO's empirical world, capturing their lived experiences to explore how management actions resulting from Covid-19 immunity testing can played out.

Findings

Providing staff with immunity tests at first glance appears sensible, decent and a caring action to take. Nevertheless, once such knowledge is personalised by employees, they can, through dialectic dialogue, feel disadvantaged and harbour feelings of unfairness. Subsequently, this paper suggests that immunity testing may only serve to raise awareness and deepen the original management dilemma of whether testing is a worthwhile activity.

Originality/value

This paper aims to be amongst the first works to empirically explore the workforce management challenges that arise within small businesses within the service sector following the completion of Covid-19 immunity testing of their staff. It seeks to achieve this via utilising the robust theoretical framework of the paradox theory to examine Covid-19's impact upon small business workforce management thinking and practice.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Anthony Samuel, Gareth R.T. White, Helen Martin and Martyn Rowling

This study aims to expand understanding of servant leadership beyond organisational boundaries by making an examination of its role in the establishment and growth of a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expand understanding of servant leadership beyond organisational boundaries by making an examination of its role in the establishment and growth of a social movement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper’s findings are developed from four sequential, semi-structured interviews and a narrated tour of Garstang with the founder of the Fairtrade Towns (FTT) movement. It follows a theoretical framework of servant leadership (SLship) from Spears (1996; 2009). Evidence is gathered through in-depth investigation of the activities of Bruce Crowther, the architect and driving force behind the FTT initiative.

Findings

The findings discovered how SLship operates in a social, place-based setting to influence Fairtrade consumption. The paper argues the success of the FTT movement is linked to Bruce Crowther’s leadership. The findings presented draw and expand upon Spears’ ten characteristics of SLship. Utilisation of this framework sees Crowther emerge as a servant leader operating at a community level to influence FT consumption via the FTT movement.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to theory by identifying the novel characteristic of servant leaders that is exploring affinity and proffers it as an extension of Spears’ framework. It also provides valuable information about the impact and importance of SLship in the efficacious advance of ethical consumerism.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Helen Clare Martin, Colin Rogers, Anthony John Samuel and Martyn Rowling

The police service in England and Wales faces unprecedented challenges as it moves further into the twenty-first century. Globalisation, increases and changes in types of…

1725

Abstract

Purpose

The police service in England and Wales faces unprecedented challenges as it moves further into the twenty-first century. Globalisation, increases and changes in types of crime, including cybercrime alongside perennial terrorist threats, coupled with budgetary constraints, mean that the way the police service has traditionally operated needs to change. In part, the police service sees the drive for professionalisation as assisting in providing an efficient and effective answer to the challenges ahead. Previous approaches to leadership styles, based upon hierarchy and rank, may not be the best approach for leaders in such a dynamic and professional organisation. The purpose of this paper is to argue for a debate and a rethink regarding the leadership styles employed by the police in their current role in the context of the influx of new graduate officers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a discursive argument based upon servant leadership (SL) models that aspire to address the multi-faceted challenges faced by the police service.

Findings

Leaders in the police service may well consider SL for its ability to release the potential and manage the aspirations of graduate officers. SL is also recognised for its potential in helping the police to better engage with important societal changes that will impact on its organisation and its structure in the future.

Social implications

Previous approaches to leadership styles, based upon hierarchy and rank, may not be the best approach for leaders in such a dynamic and professional organisation. This is discussed in relation to a suggested style of leadership.

Originality/value

This paper considers the problems faced in leading a professionalised police service and the suitability of a novel approach to leadership, that of the “Servant Leader”.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2020

Ian Pepper, Colin Rogers and Helen Martin

As the education of new police constables moves to degree level, this paper explores the introduction of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP) as a pillar of the evolution of the…

12244

Abstract

Purpose

As the education of new police constables moves to degree level, this paper explores the introduction of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP) as a pillar of the evolution of the police service as a profession.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining a review of key literature and explorations of practice, the current situation, challenges, and benefits of the adoption of EBP as philosophy are explored.

Findings

The benefits to the police service and individuals of wholeheartedly adopting EBP are huge; however, such adoption does not come without challenges.

Originality/value

This paper provides a contemporary snapshot in relation to the process of embedding EBP across the new educational routes to joining the police service. The opportunities provided by adopting EBP as philosophy across the service will assist in supporting and strengthening the sustainability of policing locally, nationally, and internationally.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Helen Martin and David Nicholas

Journalists at The Guardian have had access to online databases for some ten years now and many of them have taken to searching the databases themselves. This paper…

Abstract

Journalists at The Guardian have had access to online databases for some ten years now and many of them have taken to searching the databases themselves. This paper examines, through the results of a questionnaire survey, why journalists choose to search themselves, what kind of searches they conduct and what problems they experience in carrying out their searches. The survey's major findings are that journalists are generally high‐volume online users (although female journalists lag behind their male colleagues); their searching tends to be of the ‘quick and dirty type’ (probably through lack of training and the pressures of work), though most journalists are reasonably satisfied with the product of their searches; they are not particularly interested in viewing an electronic facsimile of the cutting; and they are generally happy to delegate the online search to the librarians.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Jeanie Wills and Krystl Raven

This paper uses archival documents to begin to recover a history of women’s leadership in the advertising industry. In particular, this paper aims to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses archival documents to begin to recover a history of women’s leadership in the advertising industry. In particular, this paper aims to identify the leadership styles of the first five presidents of the New York League of Advertising Women’s (NYLAW) club. Their leadership from 1912 to 1926 set the course for and influenced the culture of the New York League. These five women laid the foundations of a social club that would also contribute to the professionalization of women in advertising, building industry networks for women, forging leadership and mentorship links among women, providing advertising education exclusively for women and, finally, bolstering women’s status in all avenues of advertising. The first five presidents were, of course, different characters, but each exhibited the traits associated with “transformational leaders,” leaders who prepare the “demos” for their own leadership roles. The women’s styles converged with their situational context to give birth to a women’s advertising club that, like most clubs, did charity work and hosted social events, but which was developed by the first five presidents to give women the same kinds of professional opportunities as the advertising men’s clubs provided their membership. The first five presidents of the Advertising League had strong prior professional credibility because of the careers they had constructed for themselves among the men who dominated the advertising field in the first decade of the 20th century. As presidents of the NYLAW, they advocated for better jobs, equal rights at work and better pay for women working in the advertising industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on women’s advertising archival material from the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe and Wisconsin Historical Society to argue that the five founding mothers of the NYLAW provided what can best be described as transformational feminist leadership, which resulted in building an effective club for their members and setting it on a trajectory of advocacy and education that would benefit women in the advertising industry for the next several decades. These women did not refer to themselves as “leaders,” they probably would not have considered their work in organizing the New York club an exercise in leadership, nor might they have called themselves feminists or seen their club as a haven for feminist work. However, by using modern leadership theories, the study can gain insight into how these women instantiated feminist ideals through a transformational leadership paradigm. Thus, the historical documents provide insight into the leadership roles and styles of some of the first women working in American advertising in the early parts of the 20th century.

Findings

Archival documents from the women’s advertising clubs can help us to understand women’s leadership practices and to reconstruct a history of women’s leadership in the advertising industry. Eight years before women in America could vote, the first five presidents shared with the club their wealth of collective experience – over two decades worth – as advertising managers, copywriters and space buyers. The first league presidents oversaw the growth of an organization would benefit both women and the advertising industry when they proclaimed that the women’s clubs would “improve the level of taste, ethics and knowledge throughout the communications industry by example, education and dissemination of information” (Dignam, 1952, p. 9). In addition, the club structure gave ad-women a collective voice which emerged through its members’ participation in building the club and through the rallying efforts of transformational leaders.

Social implications

Historically, the advertising industry in the USA has been “pioneered” by male industry leaders such as Claude Hopkins, Albert Lasker and David Ogilvy. However, when the authors look to archival documents, it was found that women have played leadership roles in the industry too. Drawing on historical methodology, this study reconstructs a history of women’s leadership in the advertising and marketing industries.

Originality/value

This paper helps to understand how women participated in leadership roles in the advertising industry, which, in turn, enabled other women to build careers in the industry.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1907

WE have to announce with deep regret the death of Mr. I. Chalkley Gould, founder and director of the Library World since its establishment in 1898. Mr. Gould was a member…

22

Abstract

WE have to announce with deep regret the death of Mr. I. Chalkley Gould, founder and director of the Library World since its establishment in 1898. Mr. Gould was a member of an old Essex family associated with Loughton and its neighbourhood, and was born in 1844, his father being the late George Gould, of Traps Hill House, Loughton. His connection with the firm of Marlborough, Gould & Co. and other stationery and printing concerns led him many years ago to give some attention to library and museum work, towards which he had always been attracted because of his personal interest in archaeology and literature. In this way he became associated with many museums, libraries and antiquarian societies, and identified himself more particularly with the movement for the preservation of ancient British earthworks. He was a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, vice‐president of the Essex Archaeological Society, the Essex Field Club, and the British Archaeological Association. Within recent years he acted as hon. secretary of the Committee for Recording Ancient Earthworks and Fortified Enclosures—a committee for the formation of which he was largely responsible and in the work of which he took a very deep interest. He was chairman of the Committee for the Exploration of the Red Hills of Essex—an important undertaking which is not yet completed. He also contributed several valuable papers to the Victoria History of Essex, and assisted the editor of that publication in revising the earthworks sections of other counties.

Details

New Library World, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Helen Martin

Provides an update of the British Library funded project ‘The changing information environment’, which featured an analysis of Internet use at The Guardian/Observer…

243

Abstract

Provides an update of the British Library funded project ‘The changing information environment’, which featured an analysis of Internet use at The Guardian/Observer. Desktop access to the Web has made a difference, but searching skills have not improved significantly. Nor have attitudes to training or indeed library staff. In the light of the events at The Guardian/Observer considers the status and future of librarians in the media.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Helen Martin

Charts and evaluates changes to The Guardian/Observer library over the period 1983 ± 1998. Examines these developments in the light of wider changes to the newspaper…

633

Abstract

Charts and evaluates changes to The Guardian/Observer library over the period 1983 ± 1998. Examines these developments in the light of wider changes to the newspaper industry as a whole. Discusses the early arrival and impact of FT Profile; the setting up of the Association of UK Media Librarians; the increasing professionalism of newspaper library staff; computer assisted reporting (CAR), changes in service provision and a consequent change of name for the library, and the role of the Internet and intranet in the work of the unit. Identifies areas of future change.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

David Nicholas, Peter Williams, Helen Martin and Peter Cole

The Internet looks set to have a major influence on information seeking behavior, although there is very little hard data around as to what these changes will be or where…

Abstract

The Internet looks set to have a major influence on information seeking behavior, although there is very little hard data around as to what these changes will be or where they will occur. This British Library funded study set out to gather such data from the media using open‐ended interview techniques. Several hundred journalists, editors and media librarians were interviewed. The early findings indicate that the Internet is not impacting in the way forcasted. Change appears to be slow and variable; the issues of information overload and the authority of Web data seem not to worry users; and there is little evidence that other information sources are being significantly displaced because of Internet use. However, it is still too early to determine the full impact of the Internet although it is best judged away from the Information Centre/Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

1 – 10 of over 1000