Search results

1 – 10 of 182
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Jurgita Lazauskaite-Zabielske, Ieva Urbanaviciute, Tinne Vander Elst and Hans De Witte

Using the framework of fairness heuristic theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of perceived overall justice in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the framework of fairness heuristic theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of perceived overall justice in the relationship between qualitative job insecurity and attitudinal outcomes. In line with both theories, job insecurity is hypothesized to negatively relate to perceived overall organization-focused justice that subsequently relates to employees’ attitudes toward the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 291 white-collar employees were surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Overall justice was found to mediate the association between qualitative job insecurity and affective commitment, turnover intention and satisfaction with the organization.

Originality/value

The study is the first study to highlight the explanatory role of overall organization-focused justice (in contrast to the justice types) in the qualitative job insecurity–outcomes relationship.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Nele De Cuyper, Hans De Witte and Hetty Van Emmerik

The purpose of this paper is to answer two questions: How do temporary workers achieve well‐being and optimal functioning? and how is it possible to promote commitment and…

Downloads
4933

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer two questions: How do temporary workers achieve well‐being and optimal functioning? and how is it possible to promote commitment and productive behaviours among temporary workers?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review and synthesis.

Findings

Temporary employment can no longer be seen as exclusively bad or as a signal of labour market segmentation. Instead, mechanisms to promote commitment and productive behaviour that are beneficial for all parties involved can be identified. Temporary employment is a reality that is here to stay and that searches for mechanisms to reconcile the sometimes conflicting perspectives of employees and employers. This new approach is promising but researchers should also account for and create awareness about potential and sometimes less visible drawbacks associated with temporary employment (e.g. social isolation or negative implications for career success).

Originality/value

The paper shows a new approach to temporary work from both the employer and employee perspective.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Ieva Urbanaviciute, Jurgita Lazauskaite-Zabielske, Tinne Vander Elst and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to test two hypotheses. First, an indirect relationship between qualitative job insecurity and turnover intention through basic psychological…

Downloads
1377

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test two hypotheses. First, an indirect relationship between qualitative job insecurity and turnover intention through basic psychological need satisfaction was investigated. Second, a moderated mediation analysis was conducted to explore potential sectoral differences in this indirect relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used to collect and analyze the data. In total, 358 employees participated in the study (private sector n=178, public sector n=180). The data were collected through an online survey platform.

Findings

Qualitative job insecurity was indirectly related to turnover intention through the satisfaction of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness. The indirect relationships were more salient in the private sector.

Research limitations/implications

Basic psychological needs may explain the relationship between qualitative job insecurity and turnover intention. Furthermore, sector differences may exist in the way job insecurity is responded to. However, a longitudinal study is necessary to confirm the sequential effects.

Originality/value

The study provides a constructive replication of the findings on basic psychological need satisfaction as a mediator between job insecurity and employee outcomes. A novel aspect is the authors’ focus on sector differences, which draws attention to contextual factors that may shape the way employees respond to job-insecure situations.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Beatrice Piccoli, Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini, Antonio Chirumbolo, Emanuela Ingusci and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about theoretical explanations of the job insecurity-performance relationship. Specifically, the authors examine how and…

Downloads
1115

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend knowledge about theoretical explanations of the job insecurity-performance relationship. Specifically, the authors examine how and why job insecurity is negatively associated with task and contextual performance (i.e. organizational citizenship behavior) and whether organizational identification may account for these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The mediational hypotheses were examined using structural equation modeling in a heterogeneous sample of Italian employees.

Findings

Consistent with social identity theory, results show that job insecurity is related to reduced levels of identification with the organization and, consequently, to low task and contextual performance. These findings suggest that employees’ behaviors in job insecure contexts are also driven by evaluations about the perceived belongingness to the organization.

Practical implications

The research supports initial evidence that it is possible to prevent low performance resulting from job insecurity by designing interventions to boost organizational identification. By ensuring a sense of belonging and providing a positive basis for employees’ social identity, managers may increase involvement and attachment to the organization.

Originality/value

This study provides a deeper understanding of behavioral reactions to job insecurity and adds a path unexplored so far, by introducing a theoretical perspective from social psychology. Job insecurity may represent a specific condition that leads organizational identification to be a key mechanism for employees and their behaviors.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Dragos Iliescu, Irina Macsinga, Coralia Sulea, Gabriel Fischmann, Tinne Vander Elst and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating effects of the broad personality traits associated with the five-factor model (FFM) of personality, on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating effects of the broad personality traits associated with the five-factor model (FFM) of personality, on the relationship between qualitative and quantitative job insecurity (JI) and physical and mental health complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-report data collected in a cross-sectional study from a heterogeneous sample of 469 Romanian employees was analyzed with hierarchical regressions in order to identify moderation effects between each personality trait, JI and health outcomes.

Findings

Neuroticism and introversion amplify the relationship between JI and mental health complaints. None of the other personality traits showed any significant interaction with JI. No moderating effects were found for physical health complaints. Quantitative and qualitative JI show a high correlation and similar relationships with other variables, but may not be part of the same larger factor.

Practical implications

The FFM has a lower contribution than expected in explaining the JI-health dynamic, with only 2 out of 5 reaching significance. The personality traits of neuroticism and introversion function as moderately strong vulnerability factors in the JI-mental health relationship, and may be used by managers in identifying employees who are at risk in situations when JI is likely to appear.

Originality/value

The authors offer overall support for the main effect model in the relationship between JI and health, showing that, while some broad personality traits buffer the negative effect of JI in a fairly strong manner, this effect may be very difficult to completely abolish. The authors further show that quantitative and qualitative JI are very closely related facets of the broader JI construct.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Hans De Witte, Jan Vandoorne, Roel Verlinden and Nele De Cuyper

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case…

Downloads
1630

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re‐employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case studies of companies, regarding interventions during organizational restructuring.

Design/methodology/approach

Comprises a literature review, qualitative (semi‐structured and in‐depth) interviews with workers and experts, and case studies of companies.

Findings

The literature on interventions suggests the importance of “traject‐counselling” for affected workers as a most valuable intervention during organizational restructuring. In‐depth interviews with job‐insecure workers highlight the importance of fair treatment, and especially of interactional justice. Case studies and interviews delineate the components that make re‐employment initiatives successful: outplacement interventions include emotional support, training of skills and individual coaching or guidance. Belgian legislation regarding outplacement and re‐employment initiatives is unique and extensive. Possible weaknesses, however, are the complexity of procedures, the unfamiliarity of the public with the legislation and the lack of legislation at an international level.

Research limitations/implications

The reported results are based on qualitative research only. In the future, quantitative evaluation studies need to be performed, in order to evaluate the outcomes of re‐employment initiatives and of the implemented legislation.

Practical implications

The results highlight the need for training of all partners involved in organizational restructuring: workers, managers and outplacement consultants.

Originality/value

This study offers the first integrated account of research results on measures needed to re‐employ workers during (and after) organizational restructuring in Belgium. Various methods (literature review, qualitative interviews and case studies) are used. The results include valuable suggestions for other European countries.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2013

Anja Van den Broeck, Joris Van Ruysseveldt, Els Vanbelle and Hans De Witte

Several job characteristics have been suggested to influence workers’ well-being. For example, Herzberg (1968) differentiated job characteristics that offset…

Abstract

Several job characteristics have been suggested to influence workers’ well-being. For example, Herzberg (1968) differentiated job characteristics that offset dissatisfaction such as social relations from job aspects that foster job satisfaction such as opportunities for advancement. While Hackman and Oldham (1976) focused on the motivational potential of job characteristics such as task identity and feedback, Karasek (1979) accentuated time pressure as a pivotal job demand. Together these models point out that various job characteristics may influence workers’ functioning.

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Lara Christina Roll, Oi-ling Siu, Simon Y.W. Li and Hans De Witte

The recent economic crisis gave rise to job insecurity and had a seemingly greater effect on western than eastern countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent economic crisis gave rise to job insecurity and had a seemingly greater effect on western than eastern countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine cross-cultural differences of the influence of job insecurity on employees’ wellbeing, innovative work behaviour (IWB) and safety outcomes in the form of attention-related cognitive errors (ARCES) in Germany as compared to mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples from both Germany and China rate their job insecurity, work engagement, burnout, IWB and ARCES in a survey.

Findings

For both German and Chinese employees there was an indirect relationship between job insecurity and ARCES through burnout. In the German sample, there was an indirect relationship between employees’ job insecurity and IWB through work engagement. In contrast, the Chinese sample only showed the direct relationship between quantitative job insecurity and IWB, but not a mediation effect.

Practical implications

For organizations to be effective and their employees to work safely, it is essential to understand the nature and process of job insecurity in different national contexts.

Originality/value

The present research is unique by relating job insecurity to employee’ innovation on the one hand and safety outcomes on the other. Furthermore, these relationships are examined in the cultural contexts of Germany and China, contributing to the gap of research carried out in eastern contexts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Jasmina Tomas, Darja Maslić Seršić and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesized mediation model that specifies psychological climate dimensions as antecedents of job insecurity, while accounting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesized mediation model that specifies psychological climate dimensions as antecedents of job insecurity, while accounting for occupational self-efficacy. Stemming from the conservation of resources theory, the authors hypothesize that job challenge, role harmony, leader support and co-worker cooperation negatively relate to job insecurity due to its positive correlation with occupational self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with a sample of 329 white-collar employees from the ICT sector who were employed full-time and for a period of at least six months in their current organization. All hypotheses were tested via structural equation modeling using the bootstrap method to test the significance of indirect effects.

Findings

Among the four work environment domains, only job challenge had a significant contribution in explaining job insecurity variance. This relationship was fully mediated by occupational self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research design limits the ability to make causality inferences, while the convenience sampling method limits the generalizability of findings.

Practical implications

The study results indicate that well-designed (i.e. challenging, autonomous and important) job tasks may be advantageous in organizational interventions aimed at reducing job insecurity due to their potential to strengthen employees’ efficacy beliefs.

Originality/value

The study results contribute to current knowledge regarding the relative importance of work environment antecedents of job insecurity, as well as the prominent role played by occupational self-efficacy in explaining some of these relationships.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of 182