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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Chinedu James Obiegbu, Gretchen Larsen and Nick Ellis

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the act of expressing criticism against a music brand fits with the identity and practices associated with being a loyal fan of…

4194

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the act of expressing criticism against a music brand fits with the identity and practices associated with being a loyal fan of that brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from theories of brand loyalty and fandom, this interpretive inquiry makes use of data from an online forum dedicated to the band, U2, and interviews with forum members. A combination of online ethnography and discourse analysis is employed.

Findings

The findings reveal how interpretations of the act of expressing criticism within a space that ostensibly functions as a place to celebrate all things U2 related, shape the construction of loyalty to the b(r)and in diverse ways. The apparent in-group tensions between being loyal and being critical pose a challenge to the taken for granted nature of brand loyalty and fandom, highlighting the nuanced ways with which they manifest.

Originality/value

By examining the role of criticality within otherwise loyal spaces, the authors contribute to brand loyalty theory by revealing the malleability of the concept, as meaning is constantly being reshaped depending on individual realities.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Daragh O’Reilly, Kathy Doherty, Elizabeth Carnegie and Gretchen Larsen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how music consumption communities remember their past. Specifically, the paper reports on the role of heritage in constructing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how music consumption communities remember their past. Specifically, the paper reports on the role of heritage in constructing the cultural memory of a consumption community and on the implications for its identity and membership.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon insights from theories of cultural memory, heritage, and collective consumption, this interpretive inquiry makes use of interview, documentary, and artefactual analysis, as well as visual and observational data, to analyse an exhibition of the community’s popular music heritage entitled One Family – One Tribe: The Art & Artefacts of New Model Army.

Findings

The analysis shows how the community creates a sense of its own past and reflects this in memories, imagination, and the creative work of the band.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study, but one whose exploratory character provides fruitful insights into the relationship between cultural memory, imagination, heritage, and consumption communities.

Practical implications

The paper shows how consumption communities can do the work of social remembering and re-imagining of their own past, thus strengthening their identity through time.

Social implications

The study shows clearly how a consumption community can engage, through memory and imagination, with its own past, and indeed the past in general, and can draw upon material and other resources to heritagise its own particular sense of community and help to strengthen its identity and membership.

Originality/value

The paper offers a theoretical framework for the process by which music consumption communities construct their own past, and shows how theories of cultural memory and heritage can help to understand this important process. It also illustrates the importance of imagination, as well as memory, in this process.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Chinedu James Obiegbu, Gretchen Larsen, Nick Ellis and Daragh O’Reilly

This paper aims to answer the following question: How can a discursive approach to how music fans construct loyalty in a digital context contribute to a theoretical…

2341

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to answer the following question: How can a discursive approach to how music fans construct loyalty in a digital context contribute to a theoretical understanding of brand loyalty?

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from theories of brand loyalty and fandom, this interpretive inquiry makes use of data from an online forum dedicated to the rock music band, U2, and interviews with forum members. A combination of online ethnography and discourse analysis are used.

Findings

The analysis shows that music fans mobilise particular discursive resources in constructing loyalty in the digital context, specifically length of time spent as a fan, obsession and the opposition of obligation and choice. These discursive resources reflect a grounded account of an experientially rooted brand loyalty that extends beyond attitudinal and behavioural loyalty and which is particularly salient in music consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study, but as a rich and vibrant online community, it provides fruitful insights into the discursive construction of loyalty. The processes of negotiation, accommodation and conflict, engaged in through online discourse, are important in laying bare the preferences, value systems and meanings that frame the experiences of loyal consumers.

Practical implications

This socially constructed view of loyalty facilitates a more sensitive and nuanced application of brand loyalty, with implications for segmentation and targeting activities. It provides a possible basis through which precise insights can be gained into the meanings and practices of loyal fans and consumers.

Originality/value

Examining loyalty through the lens of online music fandom enables a discursive understanding of consumers’ experience of brand loyalty. It shows how online engagement with other consumers of a brand facilitates a deep engagement with the notion of loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Gretchen Larsen and Rob Lawson

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the development of consumer rights and the emergence of the contemporary consumer movement. Rethinking the contemporary…

947

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between the development of consumer rights and the emergence of the contemporary consumer movement. Rethinking the contemporary consumer movement as a new social movement (NSM) enables a closer examination of the actors, opponents and goals of the movement, and how governments and other political institutions responded by conceptualising and developing a set of “consumer rights”.

Design/methodology/approach

The lens of NSM theory is used to examine the historical development of, and relationship between, consumer rights and the contemporary consumer movement.

Findings

As a NSM, the goal of the contemporary consumer movement is to bring about ideological change. However, this paper argues that the development of “consumer rights” can be read as an attempt by oppositional forces to co‐opt the goals of the movement, thereby neutralising the threat of the movement and negating the opportunity for radical ideological change. Identifying that co‐optation can occur not only through the actors, but also via the “totality” or goals of a movement, broadens our understanding of how NSMs decline or are institutionalised.

Originality/value

This paper offers a critical interpretation of the origins and purpose of “consumer rights”. It suggests that rather than being read as a success of the contemporary consumer movement, consumer rights actually represent a co‐optation of the movement, which served to placate consumer activists while actually maintaining the very structures of advanced market capitalism and consumer culture the movement sought to destabilise.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Gretchen Larsen and Noel Dennis

1093

Abstract

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2011

Noel Dennis, Gretchen Larsen and Michael Macaulay

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the inaugural edition of Arts Marketing: An International Journal and highlight its vision for arts marketing and establish its…

1694

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the inaugural edition of Arts Marketing: An International Journal and highlight its vision for arts marketing and establish its research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant articles are discussed through the prism of current academic thinking and the latest policy developments affecting the arts.

Findings

It is found that arts marketing promotes significant academic debate, and practical insights are offered into the ways in which the arts (broadly understood) can grow in a commercial world.

Research limitations/implications

Creative solutions are needed not only to offset, but to enable arts marketing itself to grow as a discipline: marketers need to embrace the arts equally as much as artists need to embrace the market.

Practical implications

The “creative insights” section will bring practitioner expertise into the field of the arts from a variety of different perspectives.

Social implications

The arts, in their varying forms impact on all of society in some shape or form. This journal aims to help raise the profile of the arts, which will in turn, benefit society as a whole.

Originality/value

This introduction establishes a broad arts marketing research agenda for the future.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Gretchen Larsen and Daragh O'Reilly

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the reader to the changing environment of arts marketing, which poses challenges to researchers and necessitates creative…

1399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the reader to the changing environment of arts marketing, which poses challenges to researchers and necessitates creative methods of inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

The Editorial introduces the papers in this special issue.

Findings

It was found that creative inquiry in arts marketing includes the use of both established and innovative interpretive methods.

Originality/value

The Editorial explains how the application of creative methods of inquiry can aid our understanding of the relationship between art and the market.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Noel Dennis and Gretchen Larsen

203

Abstract

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Noel Dennis, Gretchen Larsen and Michael Macaulay

605

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Brett Martin and Gretchen Larsen

With its large population and increasingly open approach to foreign business dealings, China has been heralded as a land of opportunity for Western business. “What are the…

6188

Abstract

With its large population and increasingly open approach to foreign business dealings, China has been heralded as a land of opportunity for Western business. “What are the keys to business success?” Addresses this issue by Investigating key success factors for trade with China. Presents results from a survey of New Zealand organisations trading with China. Top‐ranking issues reveal a micro‐business focus (e.g. negotiation strategy, business etiquette). Low‐ranking issues include the need to understand advertising in China, and to have an intensive knowledge of the Chinese language. Correlations between importance and knowledge scores suggest that cultural issues are perceived as less important by those with a high degree of knowledge concerning trade relation intermediaries. Larger firms are also found to rate an understanding of negotiation strategy as more important than small firms.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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