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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Graham Lowings, Sarah Trout and Louise Braham

A significant number of people held within the secure forensic hospital estate in this country suffer from neuropsychological deficits (e.g. Lowings, 2010; Williams et al., 2010)…

Abstract

Purpose

A significant number of people held within the secure forensic hospital estate in this country suffer from neuropsychological deficits (e.g. Lowings, 2010; Williams et al., 2010). These deficits, many of them cognitive, have a detrimental impact on patient's abilities to benefit from psycho-educational materials thereby slowing the progress of their rehabilitation. Understanding these difficulties enables interventions to be more effectively targeted and facilitated to the patients’ cognitive strengths. It was against the backdrop of the evidence that a review was commissioned into neuropsychological activity at Rampton Hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

The review of the neuropsychological assessment activity was confined to the male patients residing within Mental Health Services (MHS) and the National High Secure Learning Disability Service (NHSLDS) of the hospital. With regards to the MHS, 129 patient files were examined in order to identify the volume of neuropsychological assessment previously undertaken and the make up of the neuropsychological test batteries administered with the current patient group. With regard to the NHSLDS 48 files were similarly examined. In addition, MHS psychologists were surveyed to assess their knowledge of patients within that service who to their knowledge had previously suffered an acquired brain injury (ABI) or had suffered a significant neurological illness likely to have resulted in cognitive impairment.

Findings

A scoping exercise identified that a significant amount of neuropsychological assessment was being undertaken, albeit in an unstructured way. This led to a number of patients being subjected to a significant delay before the need for neuropsychological testing and rehabilitation possibilities became apparent. There was a huge variance on when a patient was tested ranging from one month to 14 years and the size of the test battery used, with the number of tests conducted per patient ranging between one single test to 16 tests during a patients stay at the hospital.

Practical implications

Opportunities to more appropriately place patients based upon their abilities could be achieved if the hospital were to adopt a policy of conducting neuropsychological assessments, including cognitive functioning, for all patients upon admission to the hospital. A proportion of patients were known to have had a ABI or a significant illness likely to have resulted in cognitive impairment. This was considered to be an underrepresentation and the taking of a thorough history specifically covering ABI and specific illnesses known to have an impact on cognitive ability and behaviour was also recommended.

Originality/value

In light of this review, services are to take a more systematic approach to assessing neuropsychological difficulties. Consideration is being given to neuropsychological screening becoming part of the admission process.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Graham Lowings and Beth Wicks

Many people within secure forensic settings are expected to take part in psycho‐educational programmes as part of their treatment and rehabilitation. Many are hampered in their…

228

Abstract

Purpose

Many people within secure forensic settings are expected to take part in psycho‐educational programmes as part of their treatment and rehabilitation. Many are hampered in their progress due to cognitive difficulties. This paper aims to outline the scale of the problem and to offer potential solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The numbers of people who are placed in secure settings with known neuropsychological difficulties and the range of their cognitive problems are explored. It is proposed that individual education plans based on neuropsychological profiles together with guidance on the preparation and delivery of educational materials could improve the efficacy of psycho‐educational programmes.

Findings

Many people within the secure forensic estate have neuropsychological deficits. Many have suffered traumatic or other acquired brain injury or have deficits associated with substance misuse or even childhood emotional trauma. Others have cognitive difficulties specific to their mental health and occasionally their prescribed medication. A significant number will have intellectual disability (IQ<70) or be within the borderline range (IQ between 70 and 79).

Originality/value

Understanding neuropsychological difficulties would mean that best use is made of the psycho‐educational materials presented, thus speeding up and improving the efficacy of the rehabilitation process and potentially reducing the risk that the person poses to themselves and others. There are resources, which offer guidance to teachers of children with neuropsychological difficulties but not for the adolescent and adult forensic population. This paper addresses this gap.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way…

9807

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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