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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Daniel Stark, Sophie Thomas, David Dawson, Emily Talbot, Emily Bennett and Arleta Starza-Smith

Modern healthcare services are commonly based on shared models of care, in which a strong emphasis is placed upon the views of those in receipt of services. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern healthcare services are commonly based on shared models of care, in which a strong emphasis is placed upon the views of those in receipt of services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the parents’ experiences of their child’s neuropsychological assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed-methodology study employing both quantitative and qualitative measures.

Findings

The questionnaire measure indicated a high overall level of satisfaction. Qualitative analysis of parental interviews provided a richer insight into the parental experience and indicated four major themes.

Practical implications

Implications covered three major areas. Firstly, whilst a high value was placed upon the assessment, the need for further comprehensive neurorehabilitation and intervention was highlighted. Secondly, this study highlights the significant adversity experienced by such families and subsequent unmet psychological needs which also require consideration. Finally, findings from the current study could assist in improving future measures of satisfaction in similar services.

Originality/value

This is the first published study of parental experiences of and satisfaction with paediatric neuropsychological assessment in the UK.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Thomas Merten

The paper aims to give an introduction into symptom validity assessment (SVA) to non‐experts in the field of neuropsychology.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to give an introduction into symptom validity assessment (SVA) to non‐experts in the field of neuropsychology.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the knowledge of the progress in this field which can be conceived as one of the most prolific developments in forensic neuropsychological assessment.

Findings

By its very nature, clinical neuropsychology is a data‐driven discipline, both on the level of single‐case assessment and in research. In forensic contexts where secondary gain is immanent, uncooperativeness and malingering may threaten the integrity of data, so much so that no valid conclusions may be drawn from the data.

Originality/value

In the last 20 years, clinical and forensic neuropsychologists have been more prominent in the development of methods to detect response distortions and to identify malingering than any other profession. In forensic contexts, neuropsychological evaluations without SVA must be considered incomplete. Clinically and forensically working psychologists should strive to have a thorough knowledge of symptom validity assessment.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

128

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Cui Wei and Cui Jun‐fu

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possibility and necessity of using grey system theory in neuropsychological studies.

325

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possibility and necessity of using grey system theory in neuropsychological studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a logical analysis approach.

Findings

There are three characteristics of neuropsychological studies: the particularity of the study subjects; the specialty of the study scheme; and insufficient data from traditional statistical methods. Grey system theory is appropriate for analyzing the data collected in neuropsychological studies.

Originality/value

After several years' significant development, grey system theory has been applied in various subjects successfully. However, the application in psychology and medicine is still a rarity.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Breda Cullen and Jonathan J. Evans

This paper aims to summarise key models of the neuropsychology of memory function, illustrating how they can be used to inform the assessment and formulation of memory…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarise key models of the neuropsychology of memory function, illustrating how they can be used to inform the assessment and formulation of memory disorders in clinical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Models of short term and working memory, long-term memory and prospective memory are described. Commonly used tools and methods to assess these functions in adults are summarised.

Findings

It is argued that a clearer understanding of models of memory function adds value to the process of cognitive assessment, guiding the selection of appropriate tests and aiding diagnosis, formulation and rehabilitation planning.

Originality/value

This paper is intended to serve as a resource for professionals who encounter memory disorders in their clinical practice.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Brahm Norwich, George Koutsouris, Taro Fujita, Thomas Ralph, Anna Adlam and Fraser Milton

It is argued that the issues of translating basic science, including knowledge from neuroscience, into relevant teaching are similar to those that have been experienced…

Abstract

Purpose

It is argued that the issues of translating basic science, including knowledge from neuroscience, into relevant teaching are similar to those that have been experienced over a long period by educational psychology. This paper proposes that such a translation might be achieved through lesson study (LS), which is an increasingly used technique to stimulate teacher enquiry. To explore these issues, the purpose of this paper is to present the findings from a modified LS approach that involved psychologists and mathematics lecturers working together with school-based teachers to prepare a series of lessons on mathematics.

Design/methodology/approach

The LS team review and planning meetings and subsequent interviews were recorded and analysed for common themes, with reference to patterns of knowledge bridging. Particular attention was paid to translational issues and the kind of knowledge used.

Findings

Overall, there was some successful bridging between theory and practice, and evidence of translation of theoretical knowledge into relevant teaching practice. However, the analysis of the team’s interactions showed that relatively little involved a useful applied neuroscience/neuropsychology element, whereas other psychological knowledge from cognitive, developmental, educational and clinical psychology was considered more relevant to planning the LS.

Originality/value

This study illustrates how reference to brain functioning has currently little specific to contribute directly to school teaching, but it can arouse increased interest in psychological processes relevant to teaching and learning. This approach reaffirms the central role of teacher-led research in the relationship between theory and practice. The findings are also discussed in relation to the SECI model of knowledge creation.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Roger Stefani

For many years it has been speculated that some learning and attention problems in children are related to underlying problems in neurological functioning. In fact, the…

Abstract

For many years it has been speculated that some learning and attention problems in children are related to underlying problems in neurological functioning. In fact, the IDEA (1997) definition of learning disabilities utilizes terminology that specifically includes neurological processes and conditions: Specific learning disabilities means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations. The term includes such conditions as perceptual handicaps, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include children who have learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps, of mental retardation, or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage.This chapter begins with a review of the role of neuroimaging in advancing an understanding of the basis and nature of learning and attention problems. The ever-increasing sophistication of neurodiagnostic technology has made it possible to obtain more precise information about neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of behavior, including learning and attention. Advances in technology have greatly increased the ability to study the functioning of the brain during the performance of relatively complex mental activities. With this advanced technology it is becoming increasingly possible to visualize normal and abnormal brain functioning, including important components of basic academic skills. The chapter includes a discussion of the recent evidence about the neurological basis of learning and attention problems.

Details

Current Perspectives on Learning Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-287-0

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Damith Thushara Woods, Cathy Catroppa, Senem Eren, Celia Godfrey and Vicki A. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to review and summarise a small but growing body of literature demonstrating that by embedding intervention within a family context offers the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and summarise a small but growing body of literature demonstrating that by embedding intervention within a family context offers the greatest promise of success in working with families caring for a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

The current family-centred evidence-based research indicates the potential benefits for the delivery of family focused interventions following childhood TBI.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the paediatric TBI literature as being of the few papers to incorporate a number of novel family-centred behavioural interventions into the one review paper.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Damith T. Woods, Cathy Catroppa, Celia Godfrey, Rebecca Giallo, Jan Matthews and Vicki A. Anderson

Children with acquired brain injury (ABI) are at significant risk of serious behavioural and social difficulties. The burgeoning growth of research documenting behavioural…

Abstract

Purpose

Children with acquired brain injury (ABI) are at significant risk of serious behavioural and social difficulties. The burgeoning growth of research documenting behavioural sequelae after paediatric ABI has not been met with a concomitant level of research aimed at treating the problem. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether a manualised behavioural intervention support programme could reduce challenging behaviours in children with ABI and improve family-parental well-being and functioning.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 61 parents (48 mothers and 13 fathers) of 48 children aged between three and 12 years with mild, moderate, or severe ABI received an ABI adapted “Signposts for Building Better Behaviour” programme (Hudson et al., 2001) in group-support (GS) or telephone-support (TS) format. Trained “Signposts” practitioners delivered the programme over a five-month period. The programme consisted of nine information booklets, a DVD, and workbook. All families completed pre-intervention and post-intervention evaluations.

Findings

On an average parents completed 7.92 out of a possible nine intervention sessions (range 7-9). Parents in both TS and GS formats reported significant reductions in challenging child behaviours irrespective of injury severity. They also reported significant reductions in dysfunctional parenting practices, stress and family burden.

Originality/value

Overall, the current research provides support for Signposts to be used with families of children with ABI in an attempt to ameliorate negative outcomes for family, parent, and child.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

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