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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Kim Walters and Geoff Cram

In July 2000 a study was undertaken into the facilities offered for drinking water at 54 schools in North Yorkshire. The work also looked at hygiene standards at drinking water…

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Abstract

In July 2000 a study was undertaken into the facilities offered for drinking water at 54 schools in North Yorkshire. The work also looked at hygiene standards at drinking water fountains and whether they could pose any risk of contamination to children using them. The results showed the standard of facilities offered to children at schools varied considerably. In most schools the main provision for drinking water was from coldwater taps in school toilets. The next most popular option was drinking water fountains. A visual hygiene assessment of the fountains revealed that many of the fountains in toilets were not well maintained or clean. Traditional hygiene swabs taken from 47 fountains in 17 schools gave high bacterial colony counts, above what would be expected on a facility used for obtaining a drink of water. The main conclusion of the study was that school toilets are not an ideal type of environment for obtaining drinking water and better facilities need to be offered to children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Peter Datson, Wilson Ozuem, Kerry Howell and Geoff Lancaster

The purpose of this study is by drawing on signaling theory to address the need for more investigation into the conceptual underpinnings of sponsorships by investigating and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is by drawing on signaling theory to address the need for more investigation into the conceptual underpinnings of sponsorships by investigating and seeking to understand sponsorship objectives, opinions and practices, with a focus on smaller organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study contributes to the literature through researched findings from German respondents and a critical evaluation of literature relating to the impact of sports sponsorship on SMEs within local German communities.

Findings

Drawing on signalling theory and extant studies, the following four categories of SME sport sponsorship activities are proposed: value-based connections, social engagement, recognition and bonding.

Research limitations/implications

Sponsor, sponsee and dyadic antecedents have increased in both sophistication and complexity, resulting in expected positive consumer outcomes as the justification for marketing communication investments.

Practical implications

Sponsorship has evolved from short-term philanthropic activities to long-term strategic alliances involving billions of dollars of annual spending globally.

Social implications

SME companies have certain local opportunities that larger multinational corporations cannot replicate.

Originality/value

No study to date has provided researchers with a framework to understand sports sponsorship from an SME perspective. This paper contributes to the theories and practice of sport sponsorship, drawing on signalling theory and extant studies.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1979

Blake Tyson, Roman Iwaschkin, Gillian Mead, David Reid, Peter Gillman, Wilfred Ashworth, Clive Bingley, Edwin Fleming, Sarah Lawson and Kate Hills

AS A RESULT of present economic problems in Britain and attendant cuts in spending, there is a need to achieve maximum cost‐effectiveness in all sectors of public spending…

Abstract

AS A RESULT of present economic problems in Britain and attendant cuts in spending, there is a need to achieve maximum cost‐effectiveness in all sectors of public spending including libraries. This article examines a simple method by which economies could be made in buying multiple copies of books. It is assumed that unless librarians have freedom to buy a single copy of any book they choose, they will not achieve the breadth and depth required of first‐class libraries, be they in the public sector or in academic institutions. Perhaps second copies need cause little concern, but a pilot survey of a polytechnic library revealed cases where as many as four, six or even eight copies of the same edition had been bought on one occasion before the effectiveness of a lesser purchase could have been evaluated.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 14 March 2003

Gary M Cadenhead

As entrepreneurship education has seen substantial growth over the last ten years, so has the debate over the right mix of academic theory and practical insights that best equips…

Abstract

As entrepreneurship education has seen substantial growth over the last ten years, so has the debate over the right mix of academic theory and practical insights that best equips entrepreneurial minded business students to realize their entrepreneurial goals and to impact economies. The University of Texas at Austin’s acclaimed Moot Corp Program has not only laid the groundwork for effective, powerful entrepreneurship education, it has created a model that integrates the most value added contributions from the academic and business worlds. The Moot Corp Competition, has been a pioneer as a showcase for new ventures developed at universities across the world.

Details

Issues in Entrepeneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-200-9

Case study
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Christopher James Human and Geoff Bick

This teaching case focuses on the field of marketing, particularly, the situation of building a global brand as small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) internationalizing from an…

Abstract

Subject area

This teaching case focuses on the field of marketing, particularly, the situation of building a global brand as small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) internationalizing from an emerging market.

Study level/applicability

It is recommended for postgraduate and post-experience students, for example, in MBA programmes and executive education courses.

Case overview

This teaching case focuses on the field of marketing, particularly, the situation of building a global brand as SME internationalizing from an emerging market. It is recommended for postgraduate and post-experience students, for example, in MBA programmes and executive education courses. BOS Brands provides an interesting case on the internationalisation experience of a Born Global firm, particularly from an emerging market context. This medium-sized South African business develops, distributes and markets Rooibos-based beverages in Southern Africa and Europe, with eyes on a broader global presence. The case provides insights into the strategic decisions required to successfully take a medium-sized business into competitive foreign markets without the capital and support enjoyed by many larger multinational corporations. Among other issues, BOS Brands provides fertile ground to explore the selection of target country and entry mode, overcoming cultural and physical distance, opportunity recognition and the roles of networks and innovation.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are to: analyse the decision-making process of the internationalising SME in terms of internationalisation factors, timing and phases and evaluation of potential target countries and entry mode options and launch marketing approach; understand the complexities of marketing in a foreign cultural and business context (including cultural and physical distance); and develop alternative marketing strategies for an entrepreneurial SME to grow internationally given limited resources.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1981

Clive Bingley, Allan Bunch and Edwin Fleming

AS OUR subscription‐renewal reminders for 1982 go out, may I offer you a cautionary note— though not, perhaps, the one you will be expecting of me from these introductory words?

Abstract

AS OUR subscription‐renewal reminders for 1982 go out, may I offer you a cautionary note— though not, perhaps, the one you will be expecting of me from these introductory words?

Details

New Library World, vol. 82 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Francis Jonathan Gilbert and Margaret Pitfield

This paper focuses on the affordances of and issues surrounding the teaching of George Orwell’s novel 1984 (1949) as a set text for General Certificate of Secondary Education…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on the affordances of and issues surrounding the teaching of George Orwell’s novel 1984 (1949) as a set text for General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) English and English Literature in an examination-obsessed and heavily surveilled school system. It considers this by focussing on the classroom practice of a beginning teacher tackling the teaching of this novel for the first time and the newly appointed university tutor who is required to assess her teaching against a prescribed set of national Teachers’ Standards.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design is used, drawing on data from classroom observation, records of conversations and textual study. These data are analysed with reference to Perryman et al.’s (2018) re-evaluation of Foucault’s Panopticon (1995), a concept which explains how institutions set up surveillance systems in which people’s behaviour is shaped by their feelings of being watched.

Findings

In the context of her practicum school the beginning teacher adopts a particular approach to language study as a vehicle for teaching the novel 1984. This paper argues that such an approach, which finely focuses on the micro-detail of language, prevents teachers and students from seeing the big picture in Orwell’s novel and is therefore contrary to the spirit of his writing. It also restricts teachers from approaching the novel in ways which draw on students’ lived experiences as participants in the highly surveilled education system.

Practical implications

The push for performativity in the current era of schooling ensures that, for English teachers, fear of failing to comply with imposed and implied norms contributes to a prevailing sense of unease about their subject. Thus, persistent pressures of exam preparation and inspection-readiness drive a wedge between their subject knowledge/expertise and the classroom practices prevalent in English teaching.

Social implications

English teachers and teacher-educators are subject to a plethora of “guidelines” which filter through at every level of education and operate in a similar way to the totalitarian figurehead of Big Brother, Orwell’s fictional dictator who dominates 1984. This paper argues that away from Big Brother’s all-seeing eye there are still, however, opportunities for those professional practices that do not fit within such parameters to be discussed, explored and shared.

Originality/value

This paper offers a unique perspective on the teaching of George Orwell at the levels of school student, beginning teacher and teacher-educator. The Big Brother of this paper is not the Stalinist dictator of Orwell’s dystopia, instead manifesting in many different education-related personas. This Big Brother demands compliance with his fuzzy norms (Courtney, 2016; Perryman et al., 2018), rules which are deliberately vague and shifting and if contravened have far-reaching consequences for all concerned in the teaching and learning of English.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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