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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Oliver Mallett and Gayle Porter

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183

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Personnel Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Gayle Porter and Nada K. Kakabadse

The aim of this study is an exploration of the behavioural addictions to work (workaholism) and to use of technology (technolophilia), particularly as they overlap in…

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6328

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is an exploration of the behavioural addictions to work (workaholism) and to use of technology (technolophilia), particularly as they overlap in managers' work routines and expectations placed on their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative analysis of managers' comments from structured interviews and focus groups in several countries.

Findings

This research culminated in a model of various adaptations to both work pressure and need to use technology in today's business work, including the potential to over‐adapt or lapse into a pattern of addiction.

Research limitations/implications

The consolidation of multi‐disciplinary literature and the framework of the model will serve as a reference points for continuing research on behavioural addictions related to work and technology.

Practical implications

Human resource professionals concerned with employee well‐being can utilize the components of this model to proactively recognize problems and generate remedies. Specific suggestions are offered to offset undesirable adaptations.

Originality/value

This is the first study to focus on the mutually reinforcing addictions to work and use of technology – an important step forward in recognizing the scope of the issue and generating further research with practical application in business world.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Gayle Porter

To explore whether workaholism seems to be a pre‐requisite for success in the high‐technology industry.

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1408

Abstract

Purpose

To explore whether workaholism seems to be a pre‐requisite for success in the high‐technology industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey results from a team of fourteen managers are used as a case study, to examine tendencies believed to relate to workaholism. A variety of cross comparisons are presented as scatter plots to frame the discussion, along with composite profiles of individual managers.

Findings

While some of the managers seemed to represent the archetypal workaholic, some were quite the opposite. Others classified as either moderate or at‐risk.

Research limitations/implications

Study took place within one company and using measures taken within a relatively short time span of several months. Statistical comparisons were not possible with a group of 14. The management group was exclusively male, eliminating any potential for gender comparisons.

Practical implications

These managers had proven success within the same company and a high demand industry. Yet some did not display workaholic characteristics, refuting the idea that a demanding and fast‐paced environment requires one must be a workaholic to succeed.

Originality/value

Multiple measurement scales are used to develop composite profiles based on various aspects suggesting workaholism. This is an important examination of differences among managers within a context often cited as supporting, or perhaps requiring, workaholic tendencies. These examples indicate that employees need not sacrifice all else for work in order to get ahead.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Gayle Porter

To provide current information on managers' expectations of their employees, toward structuring future research on amount of time and energy devoted to work.

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4439

Abstract

Purpose

To provide current information on managers' expectations of their employees, toward structuring future research on amount of time and energy devoted to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data, acquired through focus groups and interviews, provide a sample of the perceptions of 57 managers in the mid‐Atlantic region of the USA regarding employees' work ethic.

Findings

The results are presented as descriptive information of interest in formulating future research. The traditional work ethic (hard work, responsibility, diligence) still dominates managers' expectations, and they believe many employees have lost the willingness to work now for later returns (that was a key component of the early Protestant work ethic in the USA). Many of the concerns these managers expressed parallel predictions by writers in social and economic history – for example, influence of early social development, emphasis on everything “instant”, and the pressure through technology to work anywhere/anytime. Some implications for practice are discussed.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it asks the managers directly about their individual expectations. Literature reflects both individual and organizational pressures for hard work, but the organizational side is assessed through examining unfortunate outcomes of policies and practices. The personal comments of the managers provide an important dimension to considering demands of the workplace.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

David O’Donnell, Gayle Porter, David McGuire, Thomas N. Garavan, Margaret Heffernan and Peter Cleary

John Seely Brown notes that context must be added to data and information to produce meaning. To move forward, Brown suggests, we must not merely look ahead but we must…

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1898

Abstract

John Seely Brown notes that context must be added to data and information to produce meaning. To move forward, Brown suggests, we must not merely look ahead but we must also learn to “look around” because learning occurs when members of a community of practice (CoP) socially construct and share their understanding of some text, issue or event. We draw explicitly here on the structural components of a Habermasian lifeworld in order to identify some dynamic processes through which a specific intellectual capital creating context, CoP, may be theoretically positioned. Rejecting the individualistic “Cogito, ergo sum” of the Cartesians, we move in line with Brown’s “we participate, therefore we are” to arrive within a Habermasian community of practice: we communicate, ergo, we create.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Gayle Porter

Organizational change initiatives are successful only through the efforts of the people, so it is important to look beyond surface reactions and understand the deeper…

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8882

Abstract

Organizational change initiatives are successful only through the efforts of the people, so it is important to look beyond surface reactions and understand the deeper implications of employees' visible work habits. By integrating work from several disciplines, this paper poses a series of questions aimed at creating better awareness of differences in how and why people work. Historic tracking of beliefs about work in the USA is provided as an example of how a positive foundation of strong work ethic can become the dysfunctional extreme of workaholism.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2005

Donna Harrison and Nicole Gerarda Power

The authors use Agarwal's (1992, 1997) research methodology for analyzing the intersection of gender, poverty and the environment in rural India and apply it to the case…

Abstract

The authors use Agarwal's (1992, 1997) research methodology for analyzing the intersection of gender, poverty and the environment in rural India and apply it to the case of fishing communities in Newfoundland. Here too, environmental degradation, “statization” and privatization of hitherto public resources, as well as technological development, and erosion of community management systems, effect similar adverse consequences on women. In both cases the effects are magnified by a retrenchment of liberal ideology that shrivels state social programs. We find the devaluation of women's fishing knowledge, their decreasing health and general nutrition, and the gendered nature of financial and temporal-spatial stress are associated with these larger trends.

Details

Gender Realities: Local and Global
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-214-6

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Jacqueline Botterill

George Mortimer Pullman (1831-1897), nineteenth century US luxury rail car entrepreneur, divides opinion. Some commemorate Pullman as a brilliant industrialist, innovator…

Abstract

Purpose

George Mortimer Pullman (1831-1897), nineteenth century US luxury rail car entrepreneur, divides opinion. Some commemorate Pullman as a brilliant industrialist, innovator and self-made man. Others view him as a loathsome robber baron, union buster, racist and affront to democracy. This paper aims to demonstrate Pullman’s significant contribution to marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical accounts of Pullman are re-examined to highlight his company’s unique adaptation of numerous marketing techniques (consumer research, brand strategy, public relations, product launch, fashion cycle, advertising, product placement and customer service marketing).

Findings

Pullman’s distinct flair for understanding his market enabled him to develop marketing strategies intertwined with broader cultural changes in ideals and practices. Pullman’s construction of destination tourism met an expanding white middle class desire for recreation and escape from the economic and racial inequality of the city. Pullman’s creed that beauty acted as a civilizing agent spoke to the social norms of leisure class femininity. Constant release of ever-grander rail cars shaped a fashion cycle around which wealthy men’s status competition turned. Pullman pioneered the leasing of luxury to control his best asset: the service of black Porters’.

Originality/value

First, this paper provides a new perspective on George Pullman, a significant figure in US history. Second, it addresses a common bias in nineteenth century historical accounts that privilege the contribution of men, industrial labor and production and shadow the role of consumption, women and leisure. Third, it challenges the idea of a clean divide between industrial and post-industrial economies by tracing contemporary consumer culture practices to their nineteenth century roots (marketing, destination tourism, brand stories, democratization of fashion, tipping and service with a smile).

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2008

Cristina Simón and Gayle Allard

Competitiveness is an often ill-defined concept that is key to economic success. This chapter focuses on the links between competitiveness and the employment relationship…

Abstract

Competitiveness is an often ill-defined concept that is key to economic success. This chapter focuses on the links between competitiveness and the employment relationship (ER). It ranks European countries by their specialization in high-technology, skilled labor sectors to yield a competitiveness ranking and examines workers’ values and attitudes to identify common ER features of the “competitive” countries. Results show that workers in competitive countries enjoy greater flexibility and autonomy. Some conclusions are raised regarding what companies can do from the HRM perspective to optimize employee capabilities, leading to more productive and competitive working environments.

Details

The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1401-0

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