Search results

1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2018

Foo Nin Ho, Hui-Ming Deanna Wang, Nga Ho-Dac and Scott J. Vitell

Firm size has been identified as one of the most important correlates with corporate social performance (CSP). Both conceptual and empirical research has been done to try…

Abstract

Purpose

Firm size has been identified as one of the most important correlates with corporate social performance (CSP). Both conceptual and empirical research has been done to try to explicate and determine this relationship; however, the results from both theoretical and empirical research have indicated a mixed and sometimes inconsistent relationship because of endogeneity between firm size and CSP. This paper aims to add to the body of knowledge by identifying and addressing some of the limitations in determining the relationship between firm size and CSP.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Arellano–Bond method to control for the endogeneity, this study tests the relationship between CSP and firm size using a panel of 380 public companies of various sizes; in various industry types; and across 19 countries in North America, Europe and Asia over a six-year period.

Findings

The results of the study show that firm size positively influences CSP and its subcomponents when endogeneity has been controlled for.

Research limitations/implications

This study lends support for the theory of the firm framework that CSP attributes are embedded in the production process that leads to higher economies of scale, and the resource-based view of firms where firms that possess valuable and inimitable resources in CSR can lead to a sustainable competitive advantage over competitors. This suggests that as firms grow in size, they can leverage their resources to achieve greater economies of scale that will lead to better CSP over time.

Originality/value

This study addresses the potential endogeneity problem between firm size and CSP and offers a broader testing context.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Ian Clark Sinapuelas and Foo Nin Ho

This paper aims to uncover the predictors of information exchange in social networking for health (SNH) care.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the predictors of information exchange in social networking for health (SNH) care.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two national studies of consumers in the USA, this research examines how trust and social connections influence information exchange. The empirical analyses use a two-stage estimation approach and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that higher trust encourages information getting, while social connections encourage information giving. In contrast to previous findings, this study shows that trust does not affect information giving when social connections are included in the model.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the role of trust and social connections in predicting information exchange in SNH. Research on general social media use has explored the role of personalities in predicting use. While this study controls for demographic variables that correlate strongly with personality types that are significant predictors, future research can determine which of the big-five personality factors correlate with information exchange. While social media usage has been steadily increasing from 2005 to 2015, the authors are unable to track changes in social media activities in healthcare over time as this study uses cross-sectional data. Future research can use panel data that can track these changes.

Practical implications

First, managers of social networks can encourage individuals with expansive networks to share their stories, as they are more likely to offer information. Second, they need to build the trust of individuals before fully reaping the benefits of SNH. This issue is especially critical for SNH if medical practitioners and public health officials need to use SNH as a communication channel. Third, medical practitioners and public health officials may need to intervene when misinformation is prevalent in SNH.

Social implications

Health-care providers and public health officials informed of information exchange predictors can modify their strategies in enacting health-related policies.

Originality/value

This research is the first to explore the links between trust, social connections and information exchange in SNH care. This research contributes to existing knowledge by identifying the important roles of trust and social connections and separate routes that these constructs influence information exchange.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Yikuan Lee, Foo Nin Ho and Ming-Chuan Wu

A product communicates to consumers through its form and function, which may generate an effective response. Little is known, however, about the impact of the interaction…

1010

Abstract

Purpose

A product communicates to consumers through its form and function, which may generate an effective response. Little is known, however, about the impact of the interaction of form and functional newness on consumers’ adoption preference. Drawing on uniqueness theory, this research aims to propose that the relative importance of form and functional newness to adoption preference could vary depending on the degree of consumers’ need for uniqueness (CNFU).

Design/methodology/approach

To mimic real consumption behavior as much as possible in these studies, the authors first choose a product that the respondents are familiar with and use on a daily basis. Second, the authors conduct a series of conjoint analysis in which respondents are presented with a set of options simultaneously and are asked to make a choice of adoption among those options. The authors conduct three conjoint studies using students and adult consumers.

Findings

Evidence from three conjoint studies using both student and adult consumer samples confirms the moderating role of CNFU. The results indicate that form and functional newness positively impact adoption preference, the positive effect of form newness is weakened in a compare-and-choose decision when functional newness is in place and this weakened interaction effect is mitigated with increasing CNFU.

Research limitations/implications

This research makes several contributions to the extant literature. First, the authors investigate the moderating role of CNFU in the interplay between form and functional newness. By identifying a distinctive pattern between high- vs low-CNFU consumers, the authors propose a new aspect to explain the inconclusive results of the interaction effects in previous studies. Extending this line of research, the authors show that there is a dynamic component to the positive influence of form and functional newness on adoption preference. Consumers’ preference for form newness, relative to functional newness, is likely to be lessened with the decrease in their need for uniqueness. Second, this research goes beyond the survey or sales data approaches of prior studies to examine the interaction of form and function in a context that reflects actual decision processes. Assuming that consumers have access to a set of options before making an adoption decision, the authors are able to determine their priorities and preferences for new products. Using conjoint analysis, the authors observe consumers make a trade-off between form and functional newness. This approach allows us to investigate the relative importance of form and functional newness in affecting consumers’ adoption decision. Finally, the consistency of the results of these three studies enhances the robustness of this research.

Practical implications

While consumers appreciate improved and newer functionality in general, this may not be the case for a novel form. For consumers who desire to belong or to fit into social norms, adopting a product with an extreme atypical form could be risky and provoke a negative social response. For those with such conservative attitudes, learning costs are likely to overshadow the excitement of owning a radical product. Thus, a product with high functional newness and standard form would be the right choice for this group of consumers. On the other hand, consumers with high CNFU are more likely to overcome concerns regarding the risks and learning costs of a novel form due to their desire to use the unconventional product display to differentiate themselves and establish their uniqueness. Therefore, a product with high functional newness and novel form may be more favorable for them. With this insight, marketers can better define their market segment and position their product strengths. For example, in the competitive smart phone industry, some brands may try to focus on high form newness to capture high-CNFU consumers (e.g. LG Flex curved cell phone).

Originality/value

First, the authors propose the moderating role of CNFU to explain the gap in the literature. This new view provides product managers and marketers with a better understanding of how consumers in different consumer segments (e.g. high vs low degree of CNFU) behave distinctively in their response to form and functional newness. Second, most of the literature on consumer response to product form has focused on consumer opinion, attitude, perception or product evaluation. This study focuses on measuring consumers’ adoption preference through a conjoint approach. This distinction is important because a positive attitude does not necessarily translate to adoption when consumers make their final choice decision. Third, prior studies test the effects of form and function using sales data or between subject experiments where respondents only view a single product. This approach is less representative of real adoption behavior when the reality is consumers often compare a set of options simultaneously and make an adoption decision among a pool of available options.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Foo Nin Ho and Mark Patrick Gallagher

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel…

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel of consumers was recruited for an afternoon of wine tasting at vineyards in Napa, California. Several potential hedonistic, utilitarian and logistical factors (i.e. winery facilities, quality of the wine and order in which the winery was visited) were measured using a journal log that was maintained by participants following the tasting experience for a period of one‐month. The conclusions drawn from this study were that group size, confidence in one's ability to purchase wine and overall assessment of a vineyard's wine portfolio were more important than the hedonistic factors in terms of inducing a sale immediately following a taste.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

FooNin Ho, Allan D. Shocker and Yewmun Yip

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether marketing alliances create value for shareholders, and whether the results are robust across different business cycles.

1021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether marketing alliances create value for shareholders, and whether the results are robust across different business cycles.

Design/methodology/approach

Using standard event study methodology, abnormal returns (AR) were computed for 402 firms which formed marketing alliances in a 12‐month period covering three business time periods, namely bull, bear and post 9/11 periods. ANOVA and regression analyses were performed on cumulative abnormal returns (CAR).

Findings

Significant and positive AR were found on announcement day for firms forming marketing alliances. When the sample is segmented by market capitalization, small cap firms were found to stand to benefit the most, particularly when partnering with a large firm. During the bear market period, marketing alliances tend to benefit small cap firms and firms with low profitability, whereas during the bull market period, marketing alliances benefit firms with low asset utilization.

Research limitations/implications

Results are limited by the accuracy of the models used to measure AR.

Practical implications

The results seem to suggest that smaller partners tend to benefit more from marketing alliance, and the effect changes with business cycle.

Originality/value

The paper analyses how the benefits of forming a marketing alliance are shared between partnering firms and how the different phases of business cycle influence the distribution of benefits.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Beng Soo Ong, Foo Nin Ho and Carolyn Tripp

Presents an account of a study which examined consumer perceptions of bonus pack offers. A bonus pack is a manufacturer’s sales promotion technique of giving the buyer an…

3474

Abstract

Presents an account of a study which examined consumer perceptions of bonus pack offers. A bonus pack is a manufacturer’s sales promotion technique of giving the buyer an extra quantity of a product at the usual price (e.g. an extra 6 oz free; buy four, get one free). No scholarly research on bonus packs was uncovered by the literature review. Hence, this study represents, perhaps, one of the earliest scholarly works on bonus packs. The research tested two offers of Vaseline Intensive Care skin lotion (one offer was of 80 percent, the other of 60 percent more free). Consumer responses ‐ their belief in the offers (quantities and prices claimed), their perceptions of the manufacturer and of the value of the deal, and their purchase intentions ‐ were measured.The measures were further analyzed by types of user (light versus heavy) and buyer (regular versus infrequent). Discusses managerial implications of the findings. For example, one finding was that bonus pack promotions lack credence. Offers suggestions on how to boost the credibility of bonus packs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Monzurul Hoque

353

Abstract

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Content available

Abstract

Details

Annals in Social Responsibility, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3515

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Mark A. Bonn, Meehee Cho and Hyemi Um

Wine as a research topic continues to address a plethora of diverse contexts. In consideration of this scope and abundance of wine literature, this study aims to provide…

1251

Abstract

Purpose

Wine as a research topic continues to address a plethora of diverse contexts. In consideration of this scope and abundance of wine literature, this study aims to provide guidance for future meaningful contributions to this existing body of wine knowledge through a comprehensive scholarly review.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 22 wine business, hospitality and tourism journals were selected and used to identify 739 refereed articles addressing wine-related topics over a 26-year period from 1990 to 2015. This was segmented using five wine research time frames, which were then separately investigated using content analysis and keyword network analysis.

Findings

Results support the importance for continued refinement of certain research areas to add understanding to wine research. In particular, the topics of marketing and tourism pertaining to wine research have fragmented into much more specialized sub-segments over this 26-year period.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include generalizability of findings because of the study’s use of 22 journals, along with the selected 26-year period. Future research should examine other time periods using other publications in peripheral and in non-related areas to seek topics potentially and inadvertently overlooked by this process. Significant topics and trends regarding wine research were identified and classified according to time periods. Information has been provided for future directions and new research agendas.

Originality/value

Based upon an examination of time periods segmented by half-decades, keyword network analysis was used to explore wine research trends. Using keyword network analytics, this method for identifying networks between key words produced findings that have brought the literature regarding wine research to a current status allowing academics to gain insights into potential direction for future research needs.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Alice Christudason

In the face of Singapore's land scarcity problem, there is an increasing prevalence of strata‐titled developments providing private housing in Singapore. This paper…

2023

Abstract

In the face of Singapore's land scarcity problem, there is an increasing prevalence of strata‐titled developments providing private housing in Singapore. This paper considers the awareness in certain quarters of certain fundamental aspects of this unique form of property ownership. The particular aspect which this paper considers is the understanding and interpretation of the term “common property” among two important groups of people. The first group comprises those who purchase strata title properties – they are referred to as “subsidiary proprietors”. The second group comprises “managing agents” (MAs), who may be delegated this task of professionally managing and maintaining the strata‐titled development. The findings of a survey are that their understanding of this fundamental term is inadequate. Based on these findings, the paper concludes with recommendations for improving the level of professionalism among MAs through licensing and courses for continuing professional development. This will bode well for the overall state of strata‐titled developments which are not only here to stay, but are expected to increase in number in Singapore.

Details

Property Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10