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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 December 2022

Merel T. Feenstra-Verschure, Dorien Kooij, Charissa Freese, Mandy Van der Velde and Evgenia I. Lysova

Many employees experience a “locked at the job” situation and are not satisfied with their current job and at the same time, perceive limited job opportunities. This study…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many employees experience a “locked at the job” situation and are not satisfied with their current job and at the same time, perceive limited job opportunities. This study examines the process that individuals who experience locked at the job go through and the coping mechanisms individuals use.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted. Of the participants, 12 were locked at the job at the time of the interview and 18 participants experienced locked at the job in the past.

Findings

The authors identified three phases. Regarding the first phase “becoming locked at the job,” various individual and work environmental causes could be identified. In the second phase “being locked at the job,” the authors identified three levels: low-, medium- and high-locked individuals. Emotion-regulated coping strategies were mainly reappraisal, positive distraction and behavioral avoidance. The third phase “ending locked at the job” revealed that a locked at the job situation often comes to an end either by taking control independently or by external force. Especially, the role of the direct supervisor was decisive during the entire locked at the job process.

Practical implications

In the practical implications, the authors suggest to discuss locked at the job throughout the entire workplace and create an open culture acknowledging that individuals may find themselves in such a situation.

Originality/value

To date, no qualitative study has been conducted before from this perspective. Therefore, it is extremely important to look at this relatively unknown phenomenon from this perspective.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2023

Merel T. Feenstra-Verschure, Dorien Kooij, Charissa Freese, Mandy van der Velde and Evgenia I. Lysova

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize job immobility concepts, e.g. staying in an unsatisfying job and perceiving limited opportunities to move and apply for another job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize job immobility concepts, e.g. staying in an unsatisfying job and perceiving limited opportunities to move and apply for another job. The existing literature on this situation of job immobility in which the employee is experiencing stuckness in the job is scattered across research domains, limited in scope and existing constructs are not clearly defined or operationalized.

Design/methodology/approach

In this conceptual paper, the authors propose the construct “locked at the job,” by reviewing and building on the job immobility literature and the theory of control and self-regulation.

Findings

This study defines the concept that consists of two dimensions as feeling dissatisfied in the current job and inactivity due to perceived limited job opportunities. This study proposes a conceptual model of antecedents and consequences of locked at the job, based on the person-environment fit theory.

Practical implications

This conceptual paper allows value to be added in practice by the conceptualization of locked at the job, in addition to providing a preview with respect to conceptual causes and consequences of this phenomenon.

Originality/value

Research on this job immobility phenomenon is scattered across different research domains, limited in scope and the concept has not been clearly defined or operationalized.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Evgenia I. Lysova and Asta Saduikyte

This paper addresses the issue of knowledge creation in organizational environment by exploring the kind of knowledge that is created through corporate volunteering and how these…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper addresses the issue of knowledge creation in organizational environment by exploring the kind of knowledge that is created through corporate volunteering and how these knowledge creation processes could be strategically managed to add value to overall corporate knowledge-creation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a qualitative case study of a single corporate volunteering project in The Netherlands.

Findings

Corporate volunteering mainly contributes to intrinsic knowledge creation. This process could be influenced by addressing design-related aspects of corporate volunteering, such as time frame and space, skill-oriented design, interdepartmental design, informal atmosphere and perceived support.

Originality/value

The paper explores corporate volunteering from the perspective of knowledge being created in this process.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Evgenia I. Lysova, Julia Richardson, Svetlana N. Khapova and Paul G. W. Jansen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how career identity informs employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how career identity informs employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the findings of a qualitative case study exploring the experiences of 29 employees involved in a planned “bottom-up” organizational change initiative. At the time of the study, all interviewees were employed in a Dutch non-profit organization.

Findings

Drawing on protean career theory and the literature on other-oriented work values, we show that career identity informs both how employees make sense of the respective organizational change and their willingness to engage in it. The authors found that proactive career behavior and a focus on other-oriented work values inform higher levels of employees’ engagement in the change, while passive career behavior and self-centered work values inform employees’ lower levels of involvement in the change initiative. Based on the findings, the authors conclude this paper with a conceptual model which captures the cyclical relationship between career identity and employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider both the individual characteristics of employees involved in change initiatives and content or contextual factors when exploring willingness to engage with change.

Practical implications

Organizational change consultants and managers need to be aware of the influence of career identity on employees’ willingness to engage in organizational change and use this information during the implementation of change initiatives.

Originality/value

The paper explores employees’ willingness to engage with organizational change initiatives through the lens of career identity.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Evgenia I. Lysova, Konstantin Korotov, Svetlana N. Khapova and Paul G. W. Jansen

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of literature on the role of family in managers’ career decision making. Specifically, the authors offer an empirical…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a growing body of literature on the role of family in managers’ career decision making. Specifically, the authors offer an empirical elaboration on a recently proposed concept of the “family-relatedness of work decisions” (FRWD) by illuminating the role of the spouse in managers’ career sensemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 88 managers who were in the final stage of their EMBA program took part in the study. The data were gathered through a personal career inventory.

Findings

The findings revealed that next to family-career salience and parent role identification, spouses also play an important role in shaping managers’ family-related career sensemaking.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the supportive role of spouses in contexts other than that of an international EMBA. Moreover, researchers should examine the role of managers’ boundary management styles in shaping the degree of their family-related career sensemaking.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that when designing and implementing developmental initiatives, organizations should consider that managers’ decisions about their next career steps may be guided by family-related concerns, and the spouse may play a specific role.

Originality/value

This paper offers the first empirical exploration and a refinement of the nascent theory of the “FRWD.” It also introduces a new construct into the theory – spousal career support – that opens new avenues for future research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Evgenia I. Lysova, Sabrine El Baroudi and Svetlana N. Khapova

This article presents a summary of the interview with Rino Schreuder, managing director of the European Management Development (EMD) Centre, founder and chairman of the European…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a summary of the interview with Rino Schreuder, managing director of the European Management Development (EMD) Centre, founder and chairman of the European Executive Development Network, Editor of the Dutch Management Development Journal, and Editorial Board member of the UK journals Development & Learning in Organizations and Leadership & Organization Development Journal. Schreuder has over 20 years of experience working for Fortune 500 and other firms in the area of management development and training.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview is conducted by three independent interviewers.

Findings

In this interview, Rino Schreuder shares his perspective on the present situation and the future of the Dutch learning and development market. Drawing on a parallel between the properties of the Dutch culture and problems in the learning market, Schreuder highlights the importance of more integrated ways of working between learning providers. He also calls for rethinking the role of learning professionals and chief learning officers (CLOs) in organizations and the organizational practices that measure learning outcomes through return on investments (ROI).

Originality/value

The paper presents valuable insights of a leading professional in the field of management development and training into the future of learning and development in The Netherlands.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Anne Gimson

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Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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