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Article

Alena Y.T. Tan, Esyin Chew and Vineetha Kalavally

This paper aims to explore the expectations of relevant stakeholders in the engineering field to better understand the demands of the twenty-first century. As the number…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the expectations of relevant stakeholders in the engineering field to better understand the demands of the twenty-first century. As the number of unemployed continues to grow in Malaysia, it is evident that as industries continue to develop, demands and new requirements for skilled workers change over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Through face-to-face interviews, the study explored the expectations of accreditation bodies, industry operators and academics in the engineering field.

Findings

Three major findings were documented: mismatch of expectations in engineering field across the stakeholders; the expected “must-have-skills” from the perspectives of the stakeholders; and the need to reassess how information transmission is cascaded to all stakeholders and remains relevant to market demand.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognized that the findings from this study may only be relevant to the engineering field and not to the other different disciplines, but the qualitative findings provide some key issues in understanding the gap between relevant stakeholders that may motivate future studies to further extend into the other disciplines.

Practical implications

With this mismatch drawn out clearly, all relevant stakeholders would be able to revisit and revaluate their existing strategy in addressing, cascading crucial information and equipping graduates with analytical skills to gain immediate employment in the market.

Originality/value

A clearer understanding on the expectations and the “must-have-skills” required in the engineering field in the twenty-first century.

Content available
Article

Esyin Chew and Xin Ni Chua

The shortage of Chinese language teachers have been identified as a pressing issue globally. This paper aims to respond to the needs by investigating and designing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The shortage of Chinese language teachers have been identified as a pressing issue globally. This paper aims to respond to the needs by investigating and designing the learning innovation with autonomous programmable robot, NAO.

Design/methodology/approach

By thoughtfully embedding NAO robot into teaching basic Chinese language, this research demonstrates an inquiry qualitative case study of artificial intelligence design principles and learning engagement with rule-based reasoning and progress test design.

Findings

This state-of-the arts robot use its emotion recognition and body language automated (LED eye with various colours) to demonstrate the Chinese words, to increase learners’ understanding and enhance their memory of the words learned. The responses conclude that the novel learning experience is more fun and interesting, thus the engagement from the axis of novelty, interactivity, motivation and interest is enhanced.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that the number of research participants was small, but the qualitative finding demonstrate key issues and recommendation that may inspire future empirical research.

Practical implications

Today, robotics is a rapidly growing field and has received significant attention in education. Humanoid robots are now increasingly used in fields such as education, hospitality, entertainment and health care. Educational robots are anticipated to serve as teaching assistants.

Originality/value

The learning engagement paradigm has shifted from manual engagement to personal response systems or mixed-reality on mobile platforms, and now with the humanoid robot, the recommendation of four principles and future work and for designing humanoid robot as a language tutor are discussed. The educational robot model can be changed to a newer robot such as CANBOT U05E.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article

Esyin Chew, Lim Jen Nee Jones and Scott Wordley

This study has explored the flipped classroom model in a private university in Malaysia. It aims to present a flipped classroom intervention for engineering education innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study has explored the flipped classroom model in a private university in Malaysia. It aims to present a flipped classroom intervention for engineering education innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research (1) revisited prominent educational theories for a flipping or flapping pedagogy, (2) implemented and explored the flipped classroom experiences in one engineering subject using the action inquiry method with thematic analysis and (3) reflectively evaluated both students’ and educators’ “flipping or flapping experience”.

Findings

The responses of the research participants are analysed and used to develop the flipping or flapping classroom principles and an ideal flipped classroom model. From passive lectures to active learning with collaborative discourse and reflective communication, flipping the classroom can offer a seamless learning experience.

Research limitations/implications

The flipped classroom model can provide good reference for other educational researchers who intended to conduct a flipped classroom. However, the small sample size with qualitative method and thematic analysis useds led to considerable theoretical development, but it may not achieve the validity standards to generalise the findings. Further empirical investigation with a systematic controlled group is recommended for future work across disciplines for extrapolation.

Originality/value

This is a genuine case study with an identified innovative teaching need to investigate how flipped classrooms can be enabled and enhanced in engineering education innovation.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Fui Chin Hiew and Esyin Chew

This paper aims to identify the digital gaps in seamless learning concept within the higher educational institutions (HEIs) context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the digital gaps in seamless learning concept within the higher educational institutions (HEIs) context.

Design/methodology/approach

The most cited mobile-assisted seamless learning framework, recent Educause higher education research report and relevant articles have been reviewed.

Findings

The digital gaps among educators and students hinder the implementation of the seamless learning framework in HEIs.

Practical implications

The finding will inform HEIs in addressing digital gaps to ensure learning and teaching enhancement with educational technology across institutions. It will also be useful for the design and improvement of the seamless learning framework. The finding may also be useful in creating awareness among educators and students as to the benefit of educational technologies.

Originality/value

No previous viewpoints have been published on digital gaps in the seamless learning concept. The digital gaps among educators and students constitute one of the most critical issues in implementing technology-assisted teaching and learning design in HEIs. This paper addresses the root of the problem by examining the digital gaps among educators and students within the seamless learning framework.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article

Esyin Chew

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how the diversity of online assessment and feedback offer a better learning experience for international students.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the action research method, the research investigated academic and international students' first experience on audio feedback and online text. Video interviews and online questionnaires were carried out.

Findings

All research participants would like to receive assessment feedback in audio form. This reflects the learning experience of students and suggests that the support of a higher educational institution or a tutor could provide for assessment and feedback enhancement in the digital world is mandatory. Other than the technological and instrumental advantage, the “human element” of audio feedback makes it unique and interesting to listen to in contrast to online written feedback.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that the number of student participants was small but the qualitative findings demonstrate some key issues in relation to international student experience and the effectiveness and engagement of assessment feedback that may inspire future empirical research.

Practical implications

Some conditions under which feedback is likely to be effective are not met as frequently as originally believed, audio feedback can be thoughtfully considered as an alternative assessment feedback mechanism for international students.

Originality/value

The “‘human element’ of audio assessment feedback” defeats online written text for international students. They appreciate the effort spent by the tutor to provide them assessment and feedback personally by “talking to them”.

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Article

Norah Jones, Esyin Chew, Catherine Jones and Alice Lau

Using the analogy of e‐learning as “the perfect storm”, the aim of this paper is to explore the disruptive nature of e‐learning in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

Using the analogy of e‐learning as “the perfect storm”, the aim of this paper is to explore the disruptive nature of e‐learning in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking a case study of a university, the paper explores the movement from an e‐intensive approach to e‐learning into an on‐campus blended learning approach. What are the lessons for higher education and how responsive are we to the new challenges. Is blended learning creating a new stability after change, or is it placing the university in the eye of the storm, a still small moment within an ongoing change process?

Findings

The paper presents findings from the E‐College Wales (ECW) project, looking at the disruptive effect on such a learning organisation from student, staff and management perspectives. It concludes by moving the focus from the e‐intensive ECW project to focus on the developments during the first year of a blended learning project and the disruption endemic in such a development

Originality/value

The paper will be of special interest to the blended learning policy maker, practitioners and educators. It includes a journey of a case study concerning blended learning.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The article offers some interesting insights into a comparatively new approach to teaching, without coming to any definitive conclusions. It will probably come as a relief to many readers to see that limits to the value of e‐teaching have been observed.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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