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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jeanne Harris, Elizabeth Craig and Henry Egan

Because analytics are increasingly becoming a key source of competitive advantage, attracting, engaging and retaining analytical talent and building an organizations'

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Abstract

Purpose

Because analytics are increasingly becoming a key source of competitive advantage, attracting, engaging and retaining analytical talent and building an organizations' analytical capability is now a key skill top management needs to learn. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Given that analytics is a relatively new management discipline and that only a few leading companies manage the talent it requires as a strategic resource, the authors collected their best practices.

Findings

The paper specifies the four main practices that top executives need to follow to create and develop a talent‐powered analytical organization.

Research limitations/implications

The authors offer anecdotal research on leading companies.

Practical implications

What distinguishes talent‐powered analytical organizations is their ability to unleash their analysts' talents to maximize and continually expand the company's analytical capabilities.

Originality/value

By building and aligning the four key talent management capabilities revealed in this paper, organizations can maximize the strategic impact of their analytical talent and continually expand the organization's collective analytical capabilities.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2022

Lovelin Ifeoma Obi, Temitope Omotayo, Damilola Ekundayo and Abiodun Kolawole Oyetunji

Building information modelling (BIM) is an innovative, collaborative process underpinned by digital technologies introduced to improve project performance in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) is an innovative, collaborative process underpinned by digital technologies introduced to improve project performance in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC). Growth in industry demands has necessitated BIM inclusion into the higher education (HE) curricula as both a pedagogic and practical objective to prepare and develop aspiring built environment (BE) professionals with the required competence for contemporary practice. However, comprehension of BIM concepts and subsequent development of the skill set required for its application remains overwhelming for students. In mitigating this challenge, adopting appropriate learner-centred strategies has been advocated. Problem-based learning (PBL) is becoming a widespread strategy to address concerns associated with authentic practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the impact of the PBL strategy on students' accelerated learning of BIM based on a case study of 53 undergraduate students in a BIM module. The network analysis and centrality measures were employed in understudying the most applicable BIM skills.

Findings

From the analyses, PBL benefits students' knowledge acquisition (cognitive and affective) of BIM concept and development of transferable skills (academic and disciplinary), equipping them with capabilities to become BIM competent and workplace ready for the AEC industry.

Originality/value

The BIM pedagogy evolves, and new skillsets emerge. Analytical, communications and collaboration skills remain sacrosanct to delivering BIM modules. These skills mentioned above are essential in getting undergraduate students ready to apply BIM in the AEC sector.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Christoph Flöthmann, Kai Hoberg and Andreas Wieland

This study aims to enhance the understanding of competency requirements of supply chain planners and analysts (SCP&As) and identify different personal preferences of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enhance the understanding of competency requirements of supply chain planners and analysts (SCP&As) and identify different personal preferences of hiring managers toward job candidates’ competency profiles.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 243 supply chain managers with hiring experience participated in an adaptive choice-based conjoint experiment to uncover the relative importance of six competency attributes, namely, analytical and problem-solving ability, interpersonal skills, general management skills, computer/IT skills, supply chain management (SCM) knowledge and industry experience.

Findings

SCM knowledge and analytical and problem-solving ability were identified as the most important competencies and were considered three times more important than general management skills. Based on convergent cluster and ensemble analysis, two types of hiring managers were identified. The first group is characterized by a pronounced preference for job candidates with extensive SCM knowledge. In contrast, the second group’s members prefer candidates with a more balanced competency profile.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings help companies to facilitate a better person–job fit, a key determinant of employee performance and job satisfaction.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Hassan Labbaf, Farhad Analoui and John W. Cusworth

Three categories of managerial skills are described as essential for effectiveness of senior managers: task, people and analytical and self‐development skills. Argues that…

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Abstract

Three categories of managerial skills are described as essential for effectiveness of senior managers: task, people and analytical and self‐development skills. Argues that managers at the lower level of the hierarchy value task‐related skills whereas self‐development and people‐ related skills are perceived as essential by the top management team. Suggests that although the above categories of managerial skills are somewhat broadly grouped in the literature there may exist distinct meaningful patterns of interrelationships among them which have several implications for the effective management training and development of senior managers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2012

Faheem Ahmed, Luiz Fernando Capretz, Salah Bouktif and Piers Campbell

Most of the studies carried out on human factor in software development concentrate primarily on personality traits. However, soft skills which largely help in determining…

1752

Abstract

Purpose

Most of the studies carried out on human factor in software development concentrate primarily on personality traits. However, soft skills which largely help in determining personality traits have been given comparatively little attention by researchers. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether employers' soft skills requirements, as advertised in job postings, within different roles of software development, are similar across different cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the literature relating to soft skills before describing a study based on 500 job advertisements posted on well‐known recruitment sites from a range of geographical locations, including North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The study makes use of nine defined soft skills to assess the level of demand for each of these skills related to individual job roles within the software industry.

Findings

It was found that in the cases of designer, programmer and tester, substantial similarity exists for the requirements of soft skills, whereas only in the case of system analyst is dissimilarity present across different cultures. It was concluded that cultural difference does not have a major impact on the choice of soft skills requirements in hiring new employee in the case of the software development profession.

Originality/value

Specific studies concerning soft skills and software development have been sporadic and often incidental, which highlights the originality of this work. Moreover, no concrete work has been reported in the area of soft skills and their demand as a part of job requirement sets in diverse cultures, which increases the value of this paper.

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Thomas H. Davenport and Jeanne G. Harris

This paper seeks to present a best practice guide to using analytics as a tool for leaders at every organizational level to drive their companies towards better decision making.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a best practice guide to using analytics as a tool for leaders at every organizational level to drive their companies towards better decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The piece is based on the book Analytics at Work by Thomas Davenport, Jeanne Harris and Robert Morison, which was published in 2010.

Findings

Accenture research shows conclusively that high‐performing businesses have a much more developed analytical orientation than other organizations. In fact they are five times more likely than their competitors to view analytical capabilities as being core to the business.

Practical implications

Senior executives are playing a crucial role in moving their organizations towards analytical decision making. Experience shows that, if leaders support analytical initiatives, they are much more likely to succeed. This is partly because of the powerful influence they exert over business culture, and partly because they can deploy the people, money and time needed to develop effective analytics capabilities. That said, senior executives are not the only people needed to build an analytical business. Almost any employee can play a vital role as an analytical leader.

Originality/value

Accenture uses case studies based on in‐depth interviews and thought leadership to demonstrate how individuals at different organizational levels have succeeded in driving their business towards analytical decision making – with impressive results.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2009

K. Barac

Changes in business environments have challenged the competencies (technical knowledge, skills and attitudes) of professional accountants. Accounting professions have…

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Abstract

Changes in business environments have challenged the competencies (technical knowledge, skills and attitudes) of professional accountants. Accounting professions have responded by developing competency frameworks. In 2008, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) issued a draft competency framework encapsulating a broad range of knowledge, skills and attributes. The objective of the study reported on here was to determine training officers’ perceptions of the knowledge and skills requirements of entry‐level trainee accountants. SAICA could consider the findings of this study in the finalisation of its competency framework. The study reveals that nearly three‐quarters of all the topics in the current prescribed SAICA syllabus are considered to make at least an important contribution to the knowledge requirements of entry‐level trainee accountants. Although more than half the management accounting topics prescribed in the SAICA syllabus are perceived as being only reasonably important, further statistical analysis revealed that TOPP (training outside public practice) training officers disagreed significantly with their TIPP (training inside public practice) counterparts on the importance of management accounting topics and perceived them to be at least important. Except for specialised topics, all other topics covering the remaining core subjects (Financial Accounting, Financial Management, Taxation and Auditing) were perceived to be important or even more than important by the respondents. The study demonstrates that there is a movement towards an expanded set of competencies beyond the technical knowledge typically taught to prospective CAs, and that there is evidence of a need for today’s entry‐level trainee accountants to receive training in communication, analytical, interpersonal and computer skills.

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Farhad Khurshid Abbasi, Amjad Ali and Naila Bibi

The purpose of this paper is to identify the gap between skills expected by managers and skills possessed by business graduates employed by banking industry.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the gap between skills expected by managers and skills possessed by business graduates employed by banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was conducted with bank officers under whom fresh business graduates were working. They were asked to indicate the importance of 12 employability skills in the industry and to rate business graduates working under them against these skills. Results are achieved by applying paired samples and independent samples t-tests on data collected from 121 bank officers.

Findings

Results prove that overall employability skills of the graduates are lesser than expected by the managers. Significant skill gaps were found for listening, problem solving, communication, leadership, interpersonal, analytical, self-management, numeracy and critical thinking. Results also reveal that problem-solving skill of male graduates is superior that that of females.

Practical implications

The study makes business graduates clear in what skills they are to learn and how it relates to the expectations of managers in banking industry. It helps business schools to revise and improve curriculum of some specialized banking programs according to the needs of the industry.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates the skills required by the banking industry out of business graduates. It also identifies the skill gaps for fresh business graduates from managerial perspective in banking industry of Pakistan.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Anwar Ibrahim, Amneh Ibrahim Al-Rababah and Qanita Bani Baker

Virtual reality (VR) technology invaded various domains including architecture practice and education. Despite its high applications in architecture design education, VR…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual reality (VR) technology invaded various domains including architecture practice and education. Despite its high applications in architecture design education, VR has a high potential to be used in architectural history courses as well. This paper aims to examine the effect of using VR technology on the students’ learning abilities of history of architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental approach was used. Two experiments were designed by creating virtual environments for two selected architectural examples from the Modern Architecture course. The participants who were students of Modern Architecture class had to complete two questionnaires, one for each example. The first one was based on Bloom’s taxonomy, and the other was prepared to test the participants’ analytical and critical skills. Besides, participants had to fill out satisfaction and ease-of-use survey on a five-step Likert scale.

Findings

Participants in the VR condition achieved better grades in knowledge gain compared to those in the traditional conditions. Their analytical and critical thinking skills were improved in the VR conditions. Gender has a significant impact on analytical and critical thinking skills. Participants recorded a high level of satisfaction; however, male students were more satisfied than female students who reported concerns about the weight of the used tools and nausea symptoms.

Research limitations/implications

This study informs architecture education and provides insights into the potentials of using advanced technology in architectural history education. Teaching the various history of architecture courses will be improved, shifted toward a more student-centered curriculum, and may acquire more excitement and conscious curiosity.

Originality/value

Using VR in architectural education is rigorous in architectural design courses and students’ design projects’ presentations. This research expands architectural education research by examining other ways of teaching history of architecture courses and its effect on the students’ knowledge gain and performance.

Details

Open House International, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Satoshi Sugahara, Kazumi Suzuki and Gregory Boland

The objective of this paper is to explore undergraduate students' self‐efficacy of their generic skills in an attempt to identify whether a student's choice of a major in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to explore undergraduate students' self‐efficacy of their generic skills in an attempt to identify whether a student's choice of a major in accounting develops these types of skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper collected its data from a survey administered in September, 2007 to undergraduate students studying at an Australian university located in the nation's capital. The questionnaires were distributed to students who were enrolled in both a Bachelor of Commerce and a Bachelor of Business Administration degree. In these degrees, students can major in any business‐related subject including business administration, human relations, finance, financial planning, and accounting. From a total response of 174 students, 165 students were identified as effective respondents.

Findings

The findings have indicated that accounting programs produce a limited impact on improving students' self‐efficacy in relation to what is required in today's accounting profession. An improvement is found in one's self‐efficacy of analytical skills only. Further analysis confirmed that there are other stronger predictors such as job experiences and the native language of English, which will affect students' higher self‐efficacy of generic skills.

Originality/value

This paper successfully contributes to the literature on students' self‐efficacy by providing the first empirical evidence on the effect that an undergraduate accounting curriculum in Australia has on developing students' self‐efficacy of generic skills. Tertiary educators, by revamping current accounting programs, will assist future graduates develop a full range of generic skills that are necessary for them to compete in today's competitive accounting environment.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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