Search results

1 – 10 of 320
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2023

Eric Lambert, Jianhong Liu and Shanhe Jiang

Police officers' attitudes toward their employing organizations are impacted by officers' perceptions of justice within the organization itself, and these perceptions can affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Police officers' attitudes toward their employing organizations are impacted by officers' perceptions of justice within the organization itself, and these perceptions can affect the bond that officers form with their organization. The current study explored how perceptions of three dimensions of organizational justice (i.e. interpersonal, procedural and distributive justice) were related to the affective (i.e. voluntary) organizational commitment of Chinese police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the current study came from a voluntary survey of 589 Chinese police officers in three areas, one each in southern, central and western China.

Findings

Based on an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression equation, interpersonal, procedural and distributive justice had similar sized positive associations with organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support the contention that perceptions of organizational justice views are related to the commitment of Chinese police officers.

Practical implications

Raising the interpersonal, procedural and distributive justice views should raise the level of affective commitment of officers.

Social implications

Enhancing the justice views of officers should benefit officers by treating them more fairly, as well as benefiting the police organization by increasing commitment of officers.

Originality/value

There has been limited research on how the different forms of organizational justice are related to officer commitment, especially among Chinese officers.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 46 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Mahesh K. Nalla, Sheeraz Akhtar and Eric Lambert

Police organizations work better when officers feel satisfied with their jobs. High job satisfaction has been linked to positive outcomes for both officers and police…

Abstract

Purpose

Police organizations work better when officers feel satisfied with their jobs. High job satisfaction has been linked to positive outcomes for both officers and police organizations. Perceived fairness of transfers should be positively associated with job satisfaction. There has been little research in this area, and none of the limited past studies have studied this association among Pakistani police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study comes from a survey of 550 officers working in the Lahore police stations in Punjab, Pakistan.

Findings

After controlling for location, work assignment, rank, length of service, marital status, age and educational level, the strongest predictor of job satisfaction was perceived fairness in transfers, an important aspect of policing in Pakistan.

Research limitations/implications

This was a single exploratory study that only measured perceived fairness of transfers. There is a need for additional studies. Further, broader measures of organizational fairness should be used in future studies.

Practical implications

Police administrators should ask staff why they perceive transfers as fair or not and what can be done to improve their perceptions.

Originality/value

There has been little research on police in Pakistan and the current study examined perceptions of fairness in terms of transfers with the job satisfaction among police officers in Pakistan.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Bitna Kim, Arizona Wan-Chun Lin and Eric Lambert

Little information on dissemination of publications on policing issues in East Asia in which one-fifth of the world's population lives is available. The research questions for the…

Abstract

Purpose

Little information on dissemination of publications on policing issues in East Asia in which one-fifth of the world's population lives is available. The research questions for the paper are: how extensive is the coverage of papers focussing on policing in East Asia; on which East Asian countries have the papers covered during the 14-year period from 2000 to 2013; what are the topics/primary issues of policing in East Asia covered across the journals; and what are the affiliations represented of authors who have published papers on policing in East Asia. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a content analysis of major policing specialty journals listed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) in terms of the number and focus of studies on East Asian police papers. Data came from 1,123 papers published in three policing journals of Police Quarterly, Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, and Policing and Society: An International Journal of Research and Policy during the period of 2000-2013.

Findings

Only 3.4 percent (n=38) of the 1,123 articles published in the three journals were on policing issues in East Asia nations. The vast majority (76.3 percent) were published in Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management. Staff issue was the most frequently researched topic. In total, 42 percent of the papers were on South Korean policing issues, followed by 31 percent on Chinese policing topics. Finally, about 45 percent of the papers were written by only US-affiliated authors, 40 percent by authors affiliated with institutions in East Asia, and only 16 percent were written in collaboration between authors associated with USA and East Asian institutions.

Originality/value

The main intent of this study is to provide information seekers with a guide to what research on policing in East Asia is being published.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Eric Lambert, Yuning Wu, Shanhe Jiang, Karuppannan Jaishankar, Sudershan Pasupuleti, Jagadish Bhimarasetty and Brad Smith

While there is a growing body of studies on the people's views of community policing, there have been a very few cross-national studies. The purpose of this paper is to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a growing body of studies on the people's views of community policing, there have been a very few cross-national studies. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast students’ views on community policing from India and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were from a survey from a total of 434 Indian and 484 US college students.

Findings

Punitive orientation had a significant effect on attitudes toward community policing, but was related to an increase in the support in India and reduction of support in the USA. Among the Indian respondents, concern for crime and support for aggressive policing had positive associations with support for community policing, and police involvement in the community had a negative association. Among the US respondents, age, educational level, and perceptions of police effectiveness had positive associations with support for community policing, and holding a punitive orientation had a negative association.

Originality/value

This study represents the attempt to examine Indian perceptions of community policing empirically. Uncovering factors that affect public support for community policing can provide useful references for police administrators to develop policies and practices that encourage more active community involvement in crime control.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Bitna Kim, Adam K. Matz, Jurg Gerber, Dan Richard Beto and Eric Lambert

The current study examines the prevalence, perceived effectiveness, and potential antecedents (e.g. departmental culture) of law enforcement agencies in collaborating with…

1096

Abstract

Purpose

The current study examines the prevalence, perceived effectiveness, and potential antecedents (e.g. departmental culture) of law enforcement agencies in collaborating with probation and parole agencies. Specifically, the study reveals how the leaders (i.e. police chief, sheriff) in law enforcement view police-community corrections partnerships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a state-wide survey of all sheriffs’ offices and a random sample of municipal police departments in Texas.

Findings

Findings indicated information sharing and specialized enforcement partnerships were the most common partnership types, partnerships were more common with adult and juvenile probation than with adult parole, and partnerships remain predominantly informal. Finally, police chiefs/sheriffs in the departments with a culture supportive of offender reentry were more likely to support and engage in partnerships with adult/juvenile probation and adult parole agencies.

Originality/value

Even without formal programs, it seems that police-probation/parole partnerships are, in one form or another, practically inevitable. The positive evaluation of law enforcement personnel leaves room for hope for expansions of such partnerships in the future.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Yuning Wu, Shanhe Jiang and Eric Lambert

This study aims to examine Chinese college students' support for community policing.

1513

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Chinese college students' support for community policing.

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least squares regression was used to investigate support for community policing based on survey data collected from over 400 college students.

Findings

Results showed that college students in general had positive attitudes toward the philosophy and practices of community policing. Support for community policing was significantly related to concerns of crime, perceptions of police, and attachment to conventional society. Individual background characteristics had no significant effect on support for community policing.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a college student sample has its weaknesses in that findings of this study have a limited generalizability, and some important predictors in explaining public perceptions, such as neighborhood characteristics, were not included. Future research should collect data from the general public and examine public attitudes toward different elements of community policing, and both perceptual and behavioral dimensions of support for community policing.

Originality/value

This study represents the first attempt to examine Chinese perceptions of community policing empirically. Uncovering factors that affect public support for community policing can provide useful references for police administrators to develop policies and practices that encourage more active community involvement in crime control.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Daniel E. Hall, Lois A. Ventura, Yung H. Lee and Eric Lambert

Adding to the existing research on criminal justice officers’ attitudes towards and experiences with civil liability, this study compared the attitudes and experiences of law…

1420

Abstract

Adding to the existing research on criminal justice officers’ attitudes towards and experiences with civil liability, this study compared the attitudes and experiences of law enforcement officers and correctional officers. Logistic regression analyses were employed to examine the affects of rank, education, experience and criminal justice occupation on officers’ attitudes towards and experiences with civil liability. Statistically significant differences by occupation, years of service, rank, and education were found. Implications and future research suggestions are discussed.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1962

I ENTERED the literary world late in the immediate post‐war years when changes of literary taste and loyalty were already in the air. The first broadcast I gave was, I remember…

Abstract

I ENTERED the literary world late in the immediate post‐war years when changes of literary taste and loyalty were already in the air. The first broadcast I gave was, I remember, an attack upon Virginia Woolf. Her books had nurtured me as an adolescent, and I was in reaction against her influence.

Details

New Library World, vol. 63 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Lisa-Maria Putz, Horst Treiblmaier and Sarah Pfoser

Field trips can change students’ attitudes and improve their learning performance, but they have rarely been investigated in logistics education research. The purpose of this…

1131

Abstract

Purpose

Field trips can change students’ attitudes and improve their learning performance, but they have rarely been investigated in logistics education research. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings from field trips that were designed to increase students’ knowledge of sustainable transport as well as to change their attitudes and behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 104 logistics students participated in this longitudinal panel study. Non-parametric statistical tests were used to test for significant effects.

Findings

Field trips build students’ knowledge, improve their attitudes and increase their behavioral intentions to use sustainable transport modes in the short and in the long term. Gains in knowledge exceed the results expected from traditional learning theories. Gender and school type are important moderating variables. Gender did not play an important role for knowledge gains, but for attitude and behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed to generalize the findings to other populations and longitudinal panel studies are necessary to investigate a long-term effect of field trips.

Practical implications

Field trips are an effective means for successful knowledge transfer and are suitable to trigger attitudinal and behavioral changes. The involvement of practitioners and the hands-on experience ensure that students combine theoretical with practical knowledge.

Originality/value

This is the first longitudinal panel study that investigates the effects of logistics field trips, which were developed collaboratively by industry, educational and research institutions.

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2023

Jennyfer Belval, Sylvie D. Lambert, Catherine-Anne Miller, Juliette Grosse, Pénélope Boudreault and Eric Belzile

An identification card facilitates access to municipal services for migrants with precarious status (MPS) in Montreal. The purpose of this study was to explore from MPS’…

Abstract

Purpose

An identification card facilitates access to municipal services for migrants with precarious status (MPS) in Montreal. The purpose of this study was to explore from MPS’ perspective the utility of the identity (ID) card and its influence on social inclusion for MPS.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential explanatory mixed methods design was used. First, a descriptive phone survey was administered (n = 119). Associations between ID card use and levels of social inclusion were assessed using ordinal logistic regression. Second, semi-structured interviews (n = 12) were done with purposely selected participants. Results were mixed using a statistics-by-theme approach.

Findings

Results showed that ID card users compared to nonusers reported higher levels of participation in society and more control/independence in daily life. No statistical associations were found between card use and sense of belonging nor sense of safety. Interviews highlighted that the ID card enabled participation in socio-recreational activities and perceived empowerment. A heightened sense of belonging was also found. Interview participants expressed fear of police despite owning the ID card.

Practical implications

Overall, although the municipal ID card promoted social inclusion for MPS, there is a need to render the ID card official to fully achieve this goal. Findings can inform the creation of public policies that foster inclusion and health of MPS in cities around the world.

Originality/value

Evaluation from MPS’ perspectives of the first ID card program of its kind in Canada.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

1 – 10 of 320