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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jui‐Chen Chen and Colin Silverthorne

This study aims to test the Hersey and Blanchard Situation Leadership Theory (SLT) of leadership effectiveness and the impact of the degree of match between leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the Hersey and Blanchard Situation Leadership Theory (SLT) of leadership effectiveness and the impact of the degree of match between leadership style and employee readiness level on a variety of measures of leadership outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The measures used were employee job satisfaction, job performance, job stress, and turnover intention. SLT argues that an effective leader adopts a leadership style according to the ability and willingness of subordinates for a given task.

Findings

The results did not support SLT predictions that an appropriate match between leadership style and subordinate readiness results in higher levels of subordinate job satisfaction and performance and lower levels of job stress and intention to leave. However, the results did partially support SLT in that, the higher the leader's leadership score, the more effective is the leader's influence. However, the leadership score did not predict job performance. There was a positive correlation between ability and willingness, employee job satisfaction, and job performance. Employee willingness positively correlated with job satisfaction and job performance and was negatively correlated with turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study apply to the Taiwan culture and may or may not apply to other “Chinese” and non‐Chinese cultures.

Practical implications

The use of the SLT in Taiwan is very widespread, so this study provides empirical evidence of its value when used in Taiwan as a tool to develop and use effective and appropriate leadership abilities.

Originality/value

Few studies have attempted to explore the value of SLT in general and in non‐Western cultures in particular. This study expands our knowledge of leadership issues to an Eastern culture and explores the theory's effectiveness related to several organizational factors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Rinki Dahiya

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance

Abstract

Purpose

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance behaviour (task performance and contextual performance) with the mediating role of organizational identification. Specifically, the study examines how and why there is a negative link between job insecurity and performance and whether organizational identification may serve as a mediating mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey of 192 employees having heterogeneous working background was analysed using the structural equation modelling (SEM) technique.

Findings

The findings highlight that the nexus between job insecurity and organizational citizenship behaviour is fully mediated by organizational identification. However, the organizational identification partially mediated the association between job insecurity and task performance.

Originality/value

The tendency of job insecurity in India is on the rise. This investigation gives a more profound comprehension of behavioural responses of job insecurity on employee performance behaviour with the social identity theoretical perspective. The study contributes to the extant literature by revisiting the model proposed by Piccoli et al. (2017) and includes organizational identification as a mediating mechanism, which has remained unexplored till now in the context of Indian manufacturing industry.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Raheel Yasin and Ghulam Jan

Drawing from transactional stress and conservation of resource theories, this study untangles the relationship between power outage, patient incivility, job stress and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from transactional stress and conservation of resource theories, this study untangles the relationship between power outage, patient incivility, job stress and proactive service performance. Further, this study also explores the mediating role of patient incivility and job stress.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was used, and data were collected from 275 healthcare professionals working in various public hospitals in Pakistan through convenience sampling. Structural equation modeling (SEM) via Smart PLS was used for data analysis.

Findings

Results revealed that power outage has significant positive impact on patient incivility and patient incivility has significant direct effect on job stress. Job stress has significant negative relationship with proactive service performance. Findings also confirmed that patient incivility mediates the relationship between power outage and job stress, and job stress mediates the relationship between patient incivility and proactive service performance.

Practical implications

This study helps the health administrators to think about the service standards of the public hospitals. Implications of this study are not limited to health sector. This study is useful for other service sectors where performance of employee affected by power outage. In addition to this, the current research helps to conduct research in other developing and underdeveloped countries which also face the problem of power outage.

Originality/value

This study marks the first step toward establishing power outage as an organizational behavior construct by demonstrating that power outage impacts significantly on proactive service performance. This study also explored the relationship between job stress and proactive service performance which was also not explored before.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Thomas A. Wright and Russell Cropanzano

For decades, since at least the famous Hawthorne studies, the happy/productive worker thesis has forcefully captured the imagination of management scholars and human…

Abstract

For decades, since at least the famous Hawthorne studies, the happy/productive worker thesis has forcefully captured the imagination of management scholars and human resource professionals alike. According to this “Holy Grail” of management research, workers who are happy on the job will have higher job performance, and possibly higher job retention, than those who are less happy. But what is happiness? Most typically, happiness has been measured in the management sciences as jobsatisfaction. This viewpoint is unnecessarily limiting. Building upon alittle remembered body of research from the 1920s, we suggest a twofold, expanded view of this thesis. First, we suggest the consideration of worker happiness as psychological well-being (PWB). Second, incorporating Fredrickson's (1998, 2001) broaden-and-build model ofpositive emotions as the theoretical base, we suggest that the job satisfaction to job performance and job satisfaction to employee retentionrelationships may be better explained by controlling for the moderating effect of PWB. Future research directions for human resource professionals are introduced.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Jerel E. Slaughter and Edgar E. Kausel

In this chapter, we argue that despite the fact that empirical research on trait neuroticism has shown fairly weak relations between the broad neuroticism trait and…

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue that despite the fact that empirical research on trait neuroticism has shown fairly weak relations between the broad neuroticism trait and overall job performance, organizational research can benefit by increased attention to the neuroticism construct. This is because the influence of neuroticism on work behavior can be best understood by separating the more general neuroticism domain into its lower level facets. We discuss various conceptualizations of neuroticism and then review existing research on the relation between the facets of neuroticism and job performance. Next, we turn our attention to a theoretical framework that suggests that the relations between neuroticism facets and job performance outcomes are explained by the social, cognitive, and behavioral effects of having varying levels of neuroticism-based traits. In so doing, we not only focus on mediated relationships between facets of neuroticism and job performance dimensions but also recognize some important moderators, as well as some expected direct relations between the facets and job performance. Finally, we discuss implications for further conceptual development, offer some suggestions for testing the propositions, and discuss potential practical implications of finding support for this model.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-056-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Minseong Kim, Jungmin Lee and Jihye Kim

This study investigates the role of grit in a work setting as well as interrelationships among work-related constructs among frontline employees of hotels. Based on the…

Abstract

This study investigates the role of grit in a work setting as well as interrelationships among work-related constructs among frontline employees of hotels. Based on the framework of grit and work-related constructs, this study proposes and tests a model that attempts to understand the dynamic relationship among the two dimensions of grit, customer orientation, job satisfaction, and job performance, with an emphasis on the moderating role of organizational tenure. The results indicate that consistency of interest significantly influences customer orientation, whereas perseverance of effort significantly affects job satisfaction. Job performance is significantly influenced by customer orientation and job satisfaction. The paths from perseverance of effort to customer orientation, from perseverance of effort to job satisfaction, and from consistency of interest to job satisfaction are significantly moderated by organizational tenure.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-956-9

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Jaron Harvey, Mark C. Bolino and Thomas K. Kelemen

For decades organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, generating a significant amount of research exploring the…

Abstract

For decades organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) has been of interest to scholars and practitioners alike, generating a significant amount of research exploring the concept of what citizenship behavior is, and its antecedents, correlates, and consequences. While these behaviors have been and will continue to be valuable, there are changes in the workplace that have the potential to alter what types of OCBs will remain important for organizations in the future, as well as what types of opportunities for OCB exist for employees. In this chapter we consider the influence of 10 workplace trends related to human resource management that have the potential to influence both what types of citizenship behaviors employees engage in and how often they may engage in them. We build on these 10 trends that others have identified as having the potential to shape the workplace of the future, which include labor shortages, globalization, immigration, knowledge-based workers, increase use of technology, gig work, diversity, changing work values, the skills gap, and employer brands. Based on these 10 trends, we develop propositions about how each trend may impact OCB. We consider not only how these trends will influence the types of citizenship and opportunities for citizenship that employees can engage in, but also how they may shape the experiences of others related to OCB, including organizations and managers.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Songshan (Sam) Huang, Zhicheng Yu, Yuhong Shao, Meng Yu and Zhiyong Li

This study examines the relative effects of human capital (HC), social capital (SC) and psychological capital (PC) on hotel employeesjob performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relative effects of human capital (HC), social capital (SC) and psychological capital (PC) on hotel employeesjob performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 417 employees from seven five-star hotels in China was recruited for the study. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to confirm the quality of measurement structures. Stepwise regression was used to examine the relative effects of the three capitals on hotel employeesjob performance.

Findings

PC was found to be the strongest predictor of self-reported job performance (SJP) among the three capitals under investigation. Education and work experience in the HC domain affected SJP, whereas SC dimensions did not. However, only education and work experience in the HC domain were found to affect supervisor-rated job performance (RJP).

Practical implications

Given the impact of PC on hotel employee’s SJP, human resource managers should attend to this capital in staff recruitment, retention and training and development.

Originality/value

This study provides a holistic comparative lens to examine the relative contribution of the three capitals on hotel employeesjob performance. This will help to further clarify the roles played by each of the capitals in hotel service work, thus advancing the development of the theories underlying each of the three capitals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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