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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Christina Soh, Quee Yong Mah, Fong Jek Gan, Daniel Chew and Edna Reid

Focuses on business firms in Singapore, identifying the industries in which the Internet is being used for business. These firms are early adopters in the local environment where…

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Abstract

Focuses on business firms in Singapore, identifying the industries in which the Internet is being used for business. These firms are early adopters in the local environment where use of the Internet for business is a new phenomenon still, and they provide information about their Internet experience in terms of their use, perceptions, and the problems encountered. Finds that companies in seven major industries lead in the business use of the Internet in Singapore: computer and information technology; hospitality; manufacturing; travel; retail; publications; and banking and finance. Most of the survey respondents use the Internet for marketing and advertising, customer service and support, information gathering, and, to a lesser degree, electronic transactions. The respondents’ perception of the attributes of the Internet are largely positive. The problems encountered by the respondents include difficulty in locating information, rising costs of Internet use, and security.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Kirstin Steele

– The purpose of this paper is to compare the traditional librarian positions with intelligence analyst positions.

210

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the traditional librarian positions with intelligence analyst positions.

Design/methodology/approach

Opinion.

Findings

Similarities outnumber differences, and borrowing vocabulary and skills could benefit both, especially regarding long-term planning and spending in academic libraries.

Research limitations/implications

Comparing salaries, management structure and possibilities for advancement would be interesting points of study.

Originality/value

A literature search for comparing librarians with intelligence analysts revealed, in part, a 2013 lecture at the annual Special Libraries Association conference by Edna Reid, and a 2012 article from the Journal of Education for Library and Information Science on incorporating aspects of intelligence analysis into library school curricula.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

J.E. Klobas

117

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Ann Skingley, Stephanie De'Ath and Luci Napleton

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on health and well-being of participation in dance and arts activities by older people living in the community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact on health and well-being of participation in dance and arts activities by older people living in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

A small-scale, mixed methods research design comprising pretest-posttest evaluation of a three month dance and arts programme. Two groups of older people underwent physical measures and completed a self-report quality of life questionnaire. Written comments and interview data were also gathered.

Findings

Physical tests (n=14) demonstrated improvements in posture, shoulder mobility and balance in both groups following the intervention, with some measures reaching statistical significance. Quality of life evaluations (n=21) also showed improvement, with the mental health subscale reaching statistical significance. Qualitative data showed that participants enjoyed the programme and felt physical, psychological and social benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The research involved only a small sample of volunteers and a limited programme length which limits its generalisability. The absence of a control group means that causality cannot be inferred. Future research should extend recruitment to a wider geographical area and a longer intervention which includes a control group.

Practical implications

Future arts interventions for older people should include consultation prior to, and throughout the project. Commissioners should consider supporting arts for health projects, building in additional funding for evaluative work.

Originality/value

This study has added to the evidence base through combining art forms within a mixed methods framework, illustrating the interplay between the art forms, the outcomes and the potential role of social context.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1903

“WE come now to another aspect of the question, and it must be admitted that the resource and ingenuity of the opposition have left nothing unnoticed. This is the common and…

Abstract

“WE come now to another aspect of the question, and it must be admitted that the resource and ingenuity of the opposition have left nothing unnoticed. This is the common and constantly repeated assertion that novels are so cheap that every working man in the country can buy all he needs for less than the annual library rate. This statement was first made some years ago when publishers commenced to issue cheap reprints of non‐copyright novels at 1s. and 6d. each. Previous to this the halfpenny evening paper had been relied upon as affording sufficient literary entertainment for the working man, but when it was found to work out at 13s. per annum, as against a library rate of 1od. or 1s. 4d., the cheap newspaper argument was dropped like a hot cinder. We doubt if the cheap paper‐covered novel is any better. Suppose a workman pays £20 per annum for his house, and is rated at £16, he will pay 1s. 4d. as library rate, or not much more than 1¼d. per month for an unlimited choice of books, newspapers and magazines. But suppose he has to depend on cheap literature. The lowest price at which he can purchase a complete novel of high quality by any author of repute is 3d., but more likely 4½d. or 6d. However, we will take 3d. as an average rate, and assume that our man has leisure to read one book every fortnight. Well, at the end of one year he will have paid 6s. 6d. for a small library by a restricted number of authors, and it will cost him an additional 4s. or 5s. if he contemplates binding his tattered array of books for future preservation. Besides this, he will be practically shut off from all the current literature on topics of the day, as his 3d. a fortnight will hardly enable him to get copyright books by the best living authors. With a Public Library at his command he can get all these, and still afford to buy an occasional poet or essayist, or novel, or technical book, well bound and printed on good paper, such as his friend who would protect him against an iniquitous library rate would not blush to see on his own shelves. It seems hard that the working men of the country should be condemned to the mental entertainment afforded by an accumulation of pamphlets. Literature clothed in such a dress as gaudy paper covers is not very inspiring or elevating, and even the most contented mind would revolt against the possession of mere reading matter in its cheapest and least durable form. The amount of variety and interest existing among cheap reprints of novels is not enough, even if the form of such books were better. It is well known to readers of wide scope that something more than mere pastime can be had out of novels. Take, for example, the splendid array of historical novels which have been written during the present century. No one can read a few of these books without consciously or unconsciously acquiring historical and political knowledge of much value. The amount of pains taken by the authors in the preparation of historical novels is enormous, and their researches extend not only to the political movements of the period, but to the geography, social state, costume, language and contemporary biography of the time. Thus it is utterly impossible for even a careless reader to escape noticing facts when presented in an environment which fixes them in the memory. For example, the average school history gives a digest of the Peninsular War, but in such brief and matter of fact terms as to scarcely leave any impression. On the other hand, certain novels by Lever and Grant, slipshod and inaccurate as they may be in many respects, give the dates and sequence of events and battles in the Peninsula in such a picturesque and detailed manner, that a better general idea is given of the history of the period than could possibly be acquired without hard study of a heavy work like Napier's History. It is hardly necessary to do more than name Scott, James, Cooper, Kingsley, Hugo, Lytton, Dumas, Ainsworth, Reade, G. Eliot, Short‐house, Blackmore, Doyle, Crockett and Weyman in support of this claim. Again, no stranger can gain an inkling of the many‐sided characteristics of the Scot, without reading the works of Scott, Ferrier, Galt, Moir, Macdonald, Black, Oliphant, Stevenson, Barrie, Crockett, Annie Swan and Ian Maclaren. And how many works by these authors can be had for 3d. each? The only way in which a stay‐at‐home Briton can hope to acquire a knowledge of the people and scenery of India is by reading the works of Kipling, Mrs. Steel, Cunningham, Meadows Taylor, and others. Probably a more vivid and memory‐haunting picture of Indian life and Indian scenery can be obtained by reading these authors than by reading laboriously through Hunter's huge gazetteer. In short, novels are to the teaching of general knowledge what illustrations are to books, or diagrams to engineers, they show things as they are and give information about all things which are beyond the reach of ordinary experience or means. It is just the same with juvenile literature, which is usually classed with fiction, and gives to that much‐maligned class a very large percentage of its turnover. The adventure stories of Ballantyne, Fenn, Mayne Reid, Henty, Kingston, Verne and others of the same class are positive mines of topographical and scientific information. Such works represent more than paste and scissors industry in connection with gazetteers, books of travel and historical works; they represent actual observation on the part of the authors. A better idea of Northern Canada can be derived from some of Ballantyne's works than from formal topographical works; while the same may be said of Mexico and South America as portrayed by Captain Mayne Reid, and the West Indies by Michael Scott. The volume of Personal Reminiscences written by R. M. Ballantyne before he died will give some idea of the labour spent in the preparation of books for the young. The life of the navy at various periods can only be learned from the books of Smollett, Marryat and James Hannay, as that of the modern army is only to be got in the works of Lever, Grant, Kipling, Jephson, “John Strange Winter” and Robert Blatchford.

Details

New Library World, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1967

L.J. Sellers, L.J. Danckwerts and L.J. Salmon

June 30, 1966 Damages — Assessment — Loss of expectation of life— Death of healthy, happy young man — Settled prospects of employment — Decline in value of money — Extent to which…

Abstract

June 30, 1966 Damages — Assessment — Loss of expectation of life— Death of healthy, happy young man — Settled prospects of employment — Decline in value of money — Extent to which to be considered — Whether Award of £500 too low — Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act, 1934 (24 & 25 Geo. V, c. 41), s.1(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1940

EDWARD GREEN

I DO not know whether the love for reading is inherited, but both my parents were voracious readers and, besides possessing a good collection of their own books, borrowed freely…

Abstract

I DO not know whether the love for reading is inherited, but both my parents were voracious readers and, besides possessing a good collection of their own books, borrowed freely from a subscription library. My earliest recollections include being read to by one or other of my parents, and my mother's proneness for falling asleep in the reading spurred me on to learn to read on my own account. I well remember that it was David Copperfield that especially interested me at that period. I soon became a good reader and read almost anything that came my way. Besides the many volumes for children in the home collection, I dipped extensively into those intended more especially for adults, including the works of Dickens, Scott, and even that now forgotten but one‐time popular Victorian work, Proverbial Philosophy by Martin Farquhar Tupper.

Details

Library Review, vol. 7 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1956

WE seem to be immediately facing a drive for much more technical education and for many more technical colleges and schools to produce it. In the condition of the world today this…

Abstract

WE seem to be immediately facing a drive for much more technical education and for many more technical colleges and schools to produce it. In the condition of the world today this is an inevitable, an indispensable, process. The reasons are loudly proclaimed and patent to every librarian, and the library must come strongly, as it always has, into the picture but perhaps now more universally and with greater intensity. Dr. Chandler, who is proceeding at a rare pace to specialize his departments, has created a new local council to unify the information work that has already been done at Liverpool. Every technical book costing over five shillings is bought, and the usual collections of periodicals and other material of technical and industrial interest are being increased and a bulletin of additions is being issued soon after the end of each month. The Technical library is one that combines lending and reference activities, telephone and postal services; in fact all the orthodox activities that have been standard in the larger towns since Glasgow began them in 1916, and possibly new and extended ones. The William Brown Library which was destroyed in Air Raids is being reconstructed and the enlarged Technical Library will be developed in it. This is one city only; every large city reports some increase in the services rendered, for example the Telex service is now available at Manchester. It is essential that public libraries everywhere realize the part they may play; if they do not, the suggestion made recently that the lending of technical books should become an activity of the Technical Colleges may become a reality.

Details

New Library World, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three thousand…

Abstract

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three thousand pairs of shoes, size eight and a half. Five shelves of unused Gucci handbags, still stuffed with paper, price tags still attached. Five hundred bras, mostly black, and a trunk full of girdles, 40 and 42 inches around the hips. Huge bottles of perfume, vats of Christian Dior wrinkle cream, a walk-in-safe littered with dozens of empty jewelry cases. When the palace of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos was opened to the public as a museum last week, foreigners and Filipinos alike gawked at what the former First Lady had left behind. “It was the worst case of conspicuous consumption I have ever seen,” said an American visitor, Rep. Stephen Solarz. “Compared to her, Marie Antoinette was a bag lady.” (Watson, 1986, p. 14)

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2022

Robert J. Ceglie, Ginger Black and Somer Saunders

COVID-19’s influence on the teaching profession will be felt for many years as teachers faced experiences that they have never encountered. The pandemic forced already taxed…

Abstract

COVID-19’s influence on the teaching profession will be felt for many years as teachers faced experiences that they have never encountered. The pandemic forced already taxed teachers to assume additional responsibilities, many of which they were not prepared to deal with. The result was an exodus of teachers from the profession, and those who remained reported challenges that impacted their personal and professional lives. The authors describe the effects on teachers and the impact that this had on them, including reasons why many departed from teaching. In closing, the authors offer recommendations to teacher preparation programs, districts, and schools.

Details

Schoolchildren of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impact and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-742-8

Keywords

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