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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Sara N. Brownmiller and Donald C. Dickinson

Librarians find the search for information on dance topics time‐consuming and difficult. There are few reference works devoted specifically to dance, and a number of those…

Abstract

Librarians find the search for information on dance topics time‐consuming and difficult. There are few reference works devoted specifically to dance, and a number of those that do exist are outdated and need revision. Further, because the field is so diverse, a search for dance information will frequently lead the investigator into a variety of related subject areas, each with its own complicated access problems. Reference librarians faced with dance inquiries may in the course of an hour find it necessary to consult sources in music, education, aesthetics, theatre, or physiology. On a more specific level, questions may call for information on such subtopics as ballet, folk dance, dance therapy, choreography, tap dance, and movement technique. College students may need information on famous dancers of the past; theatergoers may want an up‐to‐date evaluation of a performance of a specific ballet company; and dancers may often need information on technique and conditioning.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Gretchen Stolte, Noel Zaro and Kaylynn Zaro

This chapter focuses on creating a Torres Strait Island perspective on the research ethics and cultural protocols of Islander dance. Previous research into Torres Strait…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on creating a Torres Strait Island perspective on the research ethics and cultural protocols of Islander dance. Previous research into Torres Strait Islander cultural dance has traditionally focussed on the music and songs and rarely on the movements themselves or the cultural protocols of dance. Specifically, we explore how Islander dance from the Island of Mer (Meriam Kab) is not only created and practised but also how that information is communicated. This chapter asks the questions – how should Meriam Kab be researched? What are the protocols and processes that need to be followed? What is the role of Elders and how important is their place in the practice of dance? These questions will be explored through the cultural dances performed by the Gerib Sik Torres Strait Islander Corporation as an inroad into the significance of Meriam Kab as expressions of Meriam identity. Gerib Sik has a long tradition of cultural consultation in the development of their dances, and this chapter is co-authored by the directors. Through this writing, we hope to shine a spotlight on Meriam Kab research by illustrating the importance of the specificity of Islander identity.

Details

Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Saara Moisio

This article examines how spectators describe their expectations of contemporary dance by referring to action. Through discussing a qualitative audience study, the article…

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines how spectators describe their expectations of contemporary dance by referring to action. Through discussing a qualitative audience study, the article argues that spectators always have an expectation of being affected by performances they attend. This expectation can guide their interest in attending performances of certain genres instead of other possible ones on offer. Additionally, the article points out how spectators can actively manage their expectations in order to be affected.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on 21 in-depth interviews with spectators at a dance venue, a company and a festival in Finland. The analysis of the interviews combines thematic analysis with metaphor analysis. Employing the paradigm of enaction and the concept of affordances, this article approaches expectations as embodied and dynamic, created in interactions between artists, producers and spectators.

Findings

The analysis shows that when speaking about their expectations of performances, spectators use bodily and spatial metaphors. Focusing on metaphors reveals how, for the spectators, performances afford a possibility for action that affects them. The interviewed spectators describe that contemporary dance is “not set in its ways”, and therefore it keeps them “awake” and their thoughts do “not fossilize”. This way, they understand contemporary dance as a genre that affords a possibility to be affected by allowing a freedom of own interpretation and surprising experiences if they desire such.

Originality/value

Concentration on the metaphors of language offers a deeper understanding of the active nature of spectators' expectations. Understanding how spectators describe their expectations by referring to action that enables the shaping of their emotions and thoughts can help the development of arts marketing and audience engagement.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Finn Frandsen and Winni Johansen

In February 2015, Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO of the LEGO Group, invited the national and international press to a financial briefing at the company's headquarters in…

Abstract

In February 2015, Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO of the LEGO Group, invited the national and international press to a financial briefing at the company's headquarters in Billund (Denmark). 2014 had been an exceptional year of growth for the LEGO group. Nevertheless, most of the journalists present in the room were surprised when the Danish CEO suddenly began to dance in front of the audience while singing ‘Everything is awesome’ from the LEGO Movie. Why did he do it? Was it out of spontaneous joy? Or was there a strategy behind his actions? And what were the reactions of the media and LEGO employees? What can a CEO who is dancing and singing for a few seconds or minutes in front of a group of journalists tell us about leadership roles and leadership communication? The aim of this chapter is to provide plausible answers to these questions. We combine theory of dancing with three different approaches to the study of leadership: (1) a strategic approach: the CEO as a Performer, (2) a positive organizational scholarship approach: the CEO as a Chief Happiness Officer and (3) a critical approach: the CEO as a Seducer. At the end of the chapter, we discuss how this small case study can contribute to a broader understanding of strategic communication that includes a dramaturgical and multimodal perspective.

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Dennis J. Downey, Sandrine Zerbib and Derek Christopher Martin

Our research identifies political explicitness as a variable property among free spaces and its implications for the role that such spaces can potentially play vis-à-vis…

Abstract

Our research identifies political explicitness as a variable property among free spaces and its implications for the role that such spaces can potentially play vis-à-vis social movement mobilization. Specifically, spaces where politics are implicit (i.e., where political goals and values are not an explicit part of associative principles) can serve as sites where identities with affinities to social movements are cultivated while remaining open to those who do not already hold sympathetic views – representing free and open spaces. Our research draws on previously unexplored links between social movement research and leisure activity research, which explains processes of socialization across participant levels as a central dynamic in shaping collective values and individual participant identities. We illustrate our argument by exploring those processes within American belly dance as an example of a gendered leisure activity, and their influence on participants’ gender identity and related political attitudes. Findings are based on survey research of 103 dancers in the Salt Lake City, Utah, region. Data indicate wide acceptance of gender norm challenges, and affirm expectations of leisure activity research regarding community dynamics that promote such challenges.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-609-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Grassroots Leadership and the Arts for Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-687-1

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2013

Carla Stalling Walter

In this essay, two purposes are of importance. One is to frame anti consumption as a social marketing issue on micro and macro levels. The second is to set forth dance as…

Abstract

Purpose

In this essay, two purposes are of importance. One is to frame anti consumption as a social marketing issue on micro and macro levels. The second is to set forth dance as a persuasive element in anti consumption social marketing strategy, which heretofore has been under utilized and under theorized.

Methodology/approach

This essay draws from relevant existing literature in social marketing and builds and extends dance theory in television ads to conceptualize dance as a viable consumer culture aesthetic in anti consumption social marketing campaigns.

Findings

Effectively employing dance images in anti consumption social marketing campaigns may contribute to redesigning of the self-image and identity of consumers. Moreover, through linkages of positive behaviors to dance celebrations and rituals, aligned with an overall social marketing campaign, dance may facilitate reduction of negative consumption behaviors.

Social implications

Social marketers’ strategic success in high involvement behavior change depends in part on the target audience’s favorable response to message processing. The social marketing field encompasses a variety of such behaviors that if changed, improves both society as a whole, and the lives of individuals.

Originality/value of chapter

There are three aspects of value and originality in this contribution. They include forwarding anti consumption as a social marketing issue in consumer culture; theorizing dance as a somato-visceral and kinesthetic approach to anti consumption social marketing behavior change; and demonstrating dance as a positive persuasive element that can reside within the boundaries of social marketing ethics.

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Michal Stein and John Vertovec

This ethnographic study explores how local and global forces influence a unique set of self-employed people in Havana’s tourism industry – dance instructors – and how…

Abstract

This ethnographic study explores how local and global forces influence a unique set of self-employed people in Havana’s tourism industry – dance instructors – and how these circumstances drive the strategies and rationalities they use to navigate socioeconomic transformations. Cuba’s recent history of economic crises, the decline in welfare assistance, and an array of market-driven economic reforms have driven many Cubans to search for incomes in Havana’s lucrative tourism industry. Global circulations of people, wealth, and ideas shape the opportunities Cubans find in this type of work. Furthermore, strict state policies and regulations, in conjunction with underlying systems of oppression, hinder and constrain Cubans who work in tourism-based ventures. Building on theories of neoliberalism and tourism, we discuss how Cuban dance instructors develop professional skills, standardize their activities, and address global consumer desires/demands while simultaneously drawing from collectivized social norms cultivated under Cuban socialism. These hybridized formal/informal business tactics reveal how self-employed Cubans are positioned between socialist configurations and the capital-driven tourism industry. These innovative socioeconomic logics are also critical in understanding how people living in centrally planned economies, some of which are socially marginalized because of patterns of inequality, gain access to and participate with contemporary modalities of the global economy.

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Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2020

Deepjyoti Kalita and Dipen Deka

Systematic organization of domain knowledge has many advantages in archiving, sharing and retrieval of information. Ontologies provide a cushion for such practices in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Systematic organization of domain knowledge has many advantages in archiving, sharing and retrieval of information. Ontologies provide a cushion for such practices in the semantic Web environment. This study aims to develop an ontology that can preserve the knowledge base of traditional dance practices.

Design/methodology/approach

It is hypothesized that an ontology-based approach for the chosen domain might boost collaborative research prospects in the domain. A systematic methodology was developed for modeling the ontology based on the analytico-synthetic rule of library classification. Protégé 5.2 was used as an editor for the ontology using the Web ontology language combined with description logic axioms. Ontology was later implemented in a local GraphDB repository to run queries over it.

Findings

The developed ontology on traditional dances (OTD) was tested using the dances of the Rabha tribes of North East India. Rabha tribes are from an indigenous mongoloid community and have a robust presence in Southeast Asian countries, such as Myanmar, Thailand, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal. The result from HermiT reasoner found the presence of no logical inconsistency in the ontology, while the OOPS! pitfall checker tool reported no major internal inconsistency. The induced knowledge base of traditional dances of the Rabha’s in the developed OTD was further validated based on some competency questions.

Research limitations/implications

In the growing trend of globalization, preservation of the cultural knowledge base of human societies is an important issue. Traditional dances reflect a strong base of the cultural heritage of human societies as they are closely related to the lifestyle, habitat, religious practices and festivals of a specific community.

Originality/value

The current study is exclusively designed, keeping in mind the variables of traditional dance domain based on a survey of the user- and domain-specific needs. The ontology finds probable uses in traditional knowledge information systems, lifestyle-based e-commerce sites and e-learning platforms.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Manuel F. Suarez-Barraza and Jose Angel Miguel Davila

Well into the 21st century, it is difficult to deny the contribution that Mayan culture has made to the history of the world, and not only because of its contribution to…

Abstract

Purpose

Well into the 21st century, it is difficult to deny the contribution that Mayan culture has made to the history of the world, and not only because of its contribution to universal culture with its architecture, astronomy and mathematics. Understanding the management practices of a Mayan dance (the dance of the Pochó) that has transcended over the years can give us an idea of the management practices carried out by an ancestral culture such as the Maya. The purpose of this article is to establish an initial conceptual relationship between the management process proposed by Henry Fayol (1916) and the management of a Mayan dance that has survived to the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

A specific ethnographic study was carried out in the municipality of Tenosique, Tabasco (Mexico) for two consecutive years. Research methods such as direct observation, researcher diaries, in-depth interviews and photographs were utilized that allowed a study of management practices.

Findings

Thanks to the cross-checking of the data obtained, it was possible to determine a theoretical-conceptual relationship between Fayol's management process and the Mayan dance studied. In fact, 12 specific management practices found in the four phases of the process were identified. In addition, with the ethnographic study it was possible to determine the levels of intensity and impact regarding the satisfaction of those attending and performing the dance.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations are due to result from the fact that the analysis corresponds to a single Mayan dance in a specific place (Tenosique) in the state of Tabasco, Mexico.

Practical implications

To understand the management practices of the Mayan culture through the study of a dance that has remained alive until our days; this might be useful for the management practices of today's companies.

Originality/value

It is a pioneering study that analyzes a Mayan dance through the optics of management sciences.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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