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1 – 10 of over 2000

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Fernando I. Rivera, Kristine M. Molina and Ethel Nicdao

To investigate the association between subjective dimensions of socioeconomic status and psychological distress, paying particular attention to Latino subgroup differences.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the association between subjective dimensions of socioeconomic status and psychological distress, paying particular attention to Latino subgroup differences.

Methodology/Approach

We used data from the Latino sample (N = 2,554) of the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS). For our main analyses, we conducted a series of weighted multivariable linear regressions.

Findings

The results showed that subjective social status was associated with reduced psychological distress.

Research Limitations/Implications

There are several key study limitations that warrant consideration. Chiefly, data utilized were cross-sectional; thus, it is unclear whether subjective socioeconomic status (SES) precedes or follows psychological distress.

Originality/Value of Paper

Overall, our study makes several contributions to the sociological study of mental health differentials among Latinos. We show the importance of the association between subjective SES indicators and psychological distress. We also demonstrate how the associations analyzed in this study varied by Latino subethnicity, which we argue is an important step to fully understand the different social processes associated with the mental health of different Latina/o groups.

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Underserved and Socially Disadvantaged Groups and Linkages with Health and Health Care Differentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-055-9

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Magdalena Szaflarski, Shawn Bauldry, Lisa A. Cubbins and Karthikeyan Meganathan

This study investigated disparities in dual diagnosis (comorbid substance use and depressive/anxiety disorders) among US adults by nativity and racial–ethnic origin and…

Abstract

This study investigated disparities in dual diagnosis (comorbid substance use and depressive/anxiety disorders) among US adults by nativity and racial–ethnic origin and socioeconomic, cultural, and psychosocial factors that may account for the observed disparities.

The study drew on data from two waves of the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Racial–ethnic categories included African, Asian/Pacific Islander, European, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and other Hispanic/Latino. Substance use and depressive/anxiety disorders were assessed per DSM-IV. A four-category measure of comorbidity was constructed: no substance use or psychiatric disorder; substance use disorder only; depressive/anxiety disorder only; and dual diagnosis. The data were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression.

The prevalence of dual diagnosis was low but varied by nativity, with the highest rates among Europeans and Puerto Ricans born in US states, and the lowest among Mexicans and Asians/Pacific Islanders. The nativity and racial–ethnic effects on likelihood of having dual diagnosis remained significant after all adjustments.

The limitations included measures of immigrant status, race–ethnicity, and stress and potential misdiagnosis of mental disorder among ethnic minorities.

This new knowledge will help to guide public health and health care interventions addressing immigrant mental and behavioral health gaps.

This study addressed the research gap in regard to the prevalence and correlates of dual diagnosis among immigrants and racial–ethnic minorities. The study used the most current and comprehensive data addressing psychiatric conditions among US adults and examined factors rarely captured in epidemiologic surveys (e.g., acculturation).

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Health and Health Care Concerns Among Women and Racial and Ethnic Minorities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-150-8

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Duncan Brown

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667

Abstract

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Ayana Allen and Stephen D. Hancock

The purpose of this chapter is to propose a new direction in ethnographic research in education through the emergence of critical presence ethnography (CPE). Through a…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to propose a new direction in ethnographic research in education through the emergence of critical presence ethnography (CPE). Through a review of the evolution of the field of ethnography as well as the positionality of the self as ethnographer, this chapter illuminates the ways in which critical ethnographic commitments and critical reflexivity can support a critical presence perspective that captures the ways in which the researcher impacts the internal epistemology and ontology of the research environment. This chapter is a conceptual chapter and does not include a specific research design, methods, or approaches. As a conceptual piece, there are no clear-cut findings, however a review of the extant literature concerning the field of ethnography is presented as well as the roles, opportunities, and tensions that ethnographers experience in the field. Based on the authors’ ethnographic work in the field, they employ a CPE to capture the ripples of self in the research context.

The limitations of this work are that it is only presented in its conceptual form and has not been implemented nor tested in the field. As such, the implications of this work are that it be further developed and operationalized in the field of ethnography. Upon implementation and in depth testing, CPE may have the potential to positively impact the way in which education ethnographers manage researcher identity, conceptions of the self, and researcher bias within a given context. This chapter builds upon a strong body of literature concerning ethnography and critical ethnography in education. Using these processes of ethnography and the ways in which the positionality of the ethnographic researcher have been conceptualized and operationalized in the extant ethnographic literature, our work seeks to provide a way in which the ethnographer can measure his or her impact on the given context. Although infant in our conceptualization, we aspire to contribute to the conversation about ethnography, researcher positionality, and context.

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New Directions in Educational Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-623-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Husam Aldamen and Keith Duncan

The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of corporate governance systems in enhancing earnings quality during the recent global financial crisis (GFC). The…

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1557

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of corporate governance systems in enhancing earnings quality during the recent global financial crisis (GFC). The literature provides insight into the corporate governance–accruals quality relationship during periods of relative financial stability. However, little is known about periods of unexpected financial shocks such as the GFC.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 340 companies (1,020 firm years) listed on the ASX during 2007-2009. Factor analysis is used to compute corporate governance factors. Seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) is used to test the impact of pre-GFC corporate governance on accruals quality during the GFC.

Findings

Consistent with prior research, the findings suggest that good corporate governance is positively related to accruals quality before the GFC. More importantly, the impact of good governance intensifies during the GFC, where the mitigating role of governance is arguably under pressure. Furthermore, during the GFC, good corporate governance also affects the level of asset impairment.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides empirical evidence that the relationship between good corporate governance practices and accruals quality is amplified during the GFC. The results support the efforts of market regulators to improve the governance of companies and make them stronger during financial crises.

Originality/value

The study is an important addition to corporate governance research because it tests governance dynamics in a unique crisis period and establishes that corporate governance structures are effective when most needed.

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Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1994

Duncan Brown

Stresses the need for regular environmental audits within offices toensure that facilities managers are complying with current health andsafety and related legislation…

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1292

Abstract

Stresses the need for regular environmental audits within offices to ensure that facilities managers are complying with current health and safety and related legislation. Highlights areas which require particular attention, including air/water quality, physical comfort conditions, hygiene and maintenance standards. Provides an “office environment checklist” to give guidance on meeting auditing and monitoring requirements over the office environment.

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Nikolaos Georgantzis and Efi Vasileiou

This article tests whether workers are indifferent between risky and safe jobs provided that, in labor market equilibrium, wages should serve as a utility equalizing…

Abstract

This article tests whether workers are indifferent between risky and safe jobs provided that, in labor market equilibrium, wages should serve as a utility equalizing device. Workers’ preferences are elicited through a partial measure of overall job satisfaction: satisfaction with job-related risk. Given that selectivity turns out to be important, we use selectivity corrected models. Results show that wage differentials do not exclusively compensate workers for being in dangerous jobs. However, as job characteristics are substitutable in workers’ utility, they could feel satisfied, even if they were not fully compensated financially for working in dangerous jobs.

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New Analyses of Worker Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-056-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

Michael Armstrong, Duncan Brown and Peter Reilly

This paper seeks to explore the reasons why many organisations do not evaluate the effectiveness of their reward policies and practices, examines the approaches used by…

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30918

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the reasons why many organisations do not evaluate the effectiveness of their reward policies and practices, examines the approaches used by those organizations which do evaluate, and develops a model of evidence‐based reward management which describes how evaluation can take place.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a study of why organisations do or do not evaluate reward and an examination of what organizations taking evaluation seriously were doing about it. The study was based on a survey of 173 reward and HR practitioners and 13 case studies.

Findings

The survey found that only 46 per cent of respondents carried out a full evaluation. Other surveys have established that an even lower proportion evaluated. Those organisations which evaluate reward do so because they recognise that it is necessary to obtain value for money from their considerable expenditure on pay. Those who do not evaluate offer a number of reasons, but the most important was lack of resources or time. It was established that while an evidence‐based approach was desirable there was no set pattern of conducting an evaluation.

Practical implications

Information about the evaluation practices of the case study organisations and the concept of evidence‐based reward management as an approach to evaluation provide guidance to practitioners on how they can measure the effectiveness of their reward policies and practices.

Originality/value

The paper extends the pioneering research of Corby et al. to develop new insights into the process of reward evaluation.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

John Eaton and Duncan Brown

Discusses the organizational culture of Vodaphone in the mid‐1990s and the company’s attempts to bring about organizational change. In an attempt to change the culture…

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4242

Abstract

Discusses the organizational culture of Vodaphone in the mid‐1990s and the company’s attempts to bring about organizational change. In an attempt to change the culture from one of “command and control” to one of “coaching and collaboration”, a coaching programme was designed. This coaching programme is examined in some detail and the broader implications of coaching in the cultural change process are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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1 – 10 of over 2000