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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Derek Friday, David A. Savage, Steven A. Melnyk, Norma Harrison, Suzanne Ryan and Heidi Wechtler

Inventory management systems in health-care supply chains (HCSC) have been pushed to breaking point by the COVID-19 pandemic. Unanticipated demand shocks due to stockpiling of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Inventory management systems in health-care supply chains (HCSC) have been pushed to breaking point by the COVID-19 pandemic. Unanticipated demand shocks due to stockpiling of medical supplies caused stockouts, and the stockouts triggered systematic supply chain (SC) disruptions inconceivable for risk managers working individually with limited information about the pandemic. The purpose of this paper is to respond to calls from the United Nations (UN) and World Health Organization (WHO) for coordinated global action by proposing a research agenda based on a review of current knowledge and knowledge gaps on the role of collaboration in HCSCs in maintaining optimal stock levels and reinforcing resilience against stockout disruptions during pandemics.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted, and a total of 752 articles were analyzed.

Findings

Collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment practices are under-researched in the HCSC literature. Similarly, a fragmented application of extant SC collaborative risk management capabilities undermines efforts to enhance resilience against systematic disruptions from medical stockouts. The paucity of HCSC articles in humanitarian logistics and SC journals indicates a need for more research interlinking two interdependent yet critical fields in responding to pandemics.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on an exhaustive search of academic articles addressing HCSCs, there is a possibility of having overlooked other studies due to search variations in language controls, differences in publication cycle time and database search engines.

Originality/value

The paper relies on COVID-19's uniqueness to highlight the limitations in optimization and individualistic approaches to managing medical inventory and stockout risks in HCSCs. The paper proposes a shift from a fragmented to holistic application of relevant collaboration practices and capabilities to enhance the resilience of HCSCs against stockout ripple effects during future pandemics. The study propositions and suggestion for an SC learning curve provide an interdisciplinary research agenda to trigger early preparation of a coordinated HCSC and humanitarian logistics response to future pandemics.

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Derek Friday, Suzanne Ryan, Ramaswami Sridharan and David Collins

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse collaborative risk management (CRM) literature to establish its current position in supply chain risk management (SCRM) and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse collaborative risk management (CRM) literature to establish its current position in supply chain risk management (SCRM) and propose an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review of 101 peer-reviewed articles over a 21-year period was employed to analyse literature and synthesise findings to clarify terminology, definitions, CRM capabilities, and underlying theory.

Findings

CRM as a field of research is in its infancy and suffers from imprecise definitions, fragmented application of capabilities, and diverse theoretical foundations. The term CRM is identified as a more representative description of relational risk management arrangements. Six capabilities relevant to CRM are identified: risk information sharing, standardisation of procedures, joint decision making, risk and benefit sharing, process integration, and collaborative performance systems.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new definition for CRM; proposes a holistic approach in extending collaboration to SCRM; identifies a new capability; and provides a range of theories to broaden the theoretical scope for future research on CRM.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

Derek Ezra, Lord Robens' NCB successor does his work in two parts, from Monday to Friday and at weekends. Such job dedication leaves little time for his outside interest—history…

Abstract

Derek Ezra, Lord Robens' NCB successor does his work in two parts, from Monday to Friday and at weekends. Such job dedication leaves little time for his outside interest—history. But, as he tells Preston Witts' he still has a task to complete with a certain Samuel Rogers.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mark Jeffery, David Bibbs, Michael Dowhan, Daniel Grace, Lisa Jackson, Woody Maynard, Derek Yung and Steve Johnson

The case is based on a real supply chain outsourcing management decision at a major manufacturing company. The company has been disguised for confidentiality reasons. The case…

Abstract

The case is based on a real supply chain outsourcing management decision at a major manufacturing company. The company has been disguised for confidentiality reasons. The case discusses different types of outsourcing, supply chain management, the benefits and risks of outsourcing, and various pricing models for outsourcing contracts. Students must make a management decision and answer these questions: Is supply chain outsourcing a viable option for DB Toys? What will the return on investment be? What is the best outsourcing model? What is the best pricing model?

Students learn the different types of outsourcing, supply chain management, the benefits and risks of outsourcing, and various pricing models for outsourcing contracts. Students also learn how to calculate the return on investment of supply chain outsourcing. Most important, the case enables students to understand the strategic context of outsourcing, and to decide which outsourcing model and pricing is appropriate.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2024

Valerie A. Chambers, Matthew J. Hayes and Philip M.J. Reckers

Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) imposes significant costs on organizations, thus antecedents of CWB are of particular interest to both practitioners and academics. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) imposes significant costs on organizations, thus antecedents of CWB are of particular interest to both practitioners and academics. The authors examine how one’s own narcissism interacts with co-worker narcissism to influence willingness to engage in retaliatory CWB against a co-worker.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were obtained from Amazon Mechanical Turk participants and Master of Business Administration students, representing a cross-section of employee representatives.

Findings

The authors find that employees expect narcissistic co-workers to engage in continuing future CWB and this, in turn, increases employees' willingness to engage in retaliatory CWB. That is, non-narcissistic employees are provoked to engage in organizationally-destructive behaviors by peers perceived as narcissists. This affect is attenuated by the employee’s own narcissism. Relative to non-narcissists, narcissistic employees find a narcissistic co-worker more likeable, which reduces their willingness to engage in retaliatory CWB against the co-worker.

Practical implications

For corporations and HR managers, this study demonstrates the caution necessary when considering hiring and operational practices. Specifically, non-narcissists demonstrate increased willingness to engage in organizationally-destructive behaviors after interpersonal conflict with a narcissistic co-worker.

Originality/value

The authors extend prior research about interpersonal drivers of CWB, which primarily considered superior-subordinate dyad, by examining the joint effects of individual and co-worker narcissism in peer-to-peer relationships.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2023

Samson Samwel Shillamkwese, Qingxiong (Derek) Weng, Hirra Pervez Butt, Hussain Tariq and Zahid Hameed

Although work-related antecedents of abusive supervision are well-known, knowledge on the cross-domain antecedents of this destructive leadership behavior is scarce. Accordingly…

Abstract

Purpose

Although work-related antecedents of abusive supervision are well-known, knowledge on the cross-domain antecedents of this destructive leadership behavior is scarce. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate off-the-job supervisors’ after-work experiences that may influence their work behavior. The authors explore how and when a supervisor’s poor recovery experiences lead to abusive supervisory behaviors through a negative start-of-workday mood for high vs low supervisor sleep quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a single-source, three-phase field study (N = 422) to test the proposed moderated mediation model for participants from a large telecommunications company located in Anhui province, People’s Republic of China.

Findings

Poor recovery experiences in the supervisor’s personal life can spill over to their work domain and provoke abusive supervisory behavior through the mediating effect of a negative start-of-workday mood. Moreover, a supervisor’s good night’s sleep (i.e. first-stage moderator) serves as a key mitigating factor to diminish the negative start-of-workday mood resulting from a lack of relaxation, mastery experiences and control experiences (except for the lack of psychological detachment from work) and lessens abusive supervision.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature examining off-the-job events to understand the antecedents of abusive supervision that are beyond organizations’ control but significantly influence workplace behaviors, showing that not all antecedents of abusive supervision exist in the workplace; some are transferred from the home domain through nonvisible moods. Finally, the inclusion of sleep quality as a first-stage moderator provides insights on preventing abusive supervision caused by nonwork-related events. This adds a unique dimension to the abusive supervision literature by highlighting factors in the home domain that can prevent negative spillovers to the work domain. The authors conclude with some theoretical and practical implications for researchers and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Trevor Bentley

When groups meet, people form assumptions about the roles of variousparticipants within that group. Examines what these assumptions areusing three different approaches…

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Abstract

When groups meet, people form assumptions about the roles of various participants within that group. Examines what these assumptions are using three different approaches: restructured non‐directed interaction; exploration of reasons for being there; self‐introduction of group and discussion of group roles. Discusses the role of facilitator in a group, and defines facilitation as opposed to leadership, finding facilitation is about empowering people to take control and responsibility for their own efforts. Illustrates how to become a good facilitator using fictional characters from a facilitation skills workshop. Ends by revealing how an individual′s potential can be released.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

THIS YEAR — that seemed like a New Year (as indeed it was) not so long ago is already a third gone. We can wonder at its speed of passing, and wonder, too, what it will have in…

Abstract

THIS YEAR — that seemed like a New Year (as indeed it was) not so long ago is already a third gone. We can wonder at its speed of passing, and wonder, too, what it will have in store for us for the rest of the time before us.

Details

Work Study, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal…

Abstract

The Howard Shuttering Contractors case throws considerable light on the importance which the tribunals attach to warnings before dismissing an employee. In this case the tribunal took great pains to interpret the intention of the parties to the different site agreements, and it came to the conclusion that the agreed procedure was not followed. One other matter, which must be particularly noted by employers, is that where a final warning is required, this final warning must be “a warning”, and not the actual dismissal. So that where, for example, three warnings are to be given, the third must be a “warning”. It is after the employee has misconducted himself thereafter that the employer may dismiss.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

1 – 10 of 122