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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2023

Luca Tisu and Delia Vîrgă

Based on the Job Demands-Resources theory, this study investigates whether psychological capital (PsyCap) is a precursor of the one-directional work-to-home enrichment (WHE…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the Job Demands-Resources theory, this study investigates whether psychological capital (PsyCap) is a precursor of the one-directional work-to-home enrichment (WHE) process through a parallel mediation mechanism enabled by promotion-focused job crafting components.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted on 231 Romanian employees. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

PsyCap (what I can do) is an antecedent of all three promotion-focused job crafting behaviors (what I actually do) and WHE. Two specific job crafting dimensions – increasing social job resources and increasing challenging job demands – fully mediate the link between PsyCap and WHE. Increasing structural job resources does not predict WHE.

Originality/value

This study identifies PsyCap as an antecedent of WHE. It also uncovers underlying behavioral mechanisms that enable the transfer of resources from the work role to individuals' home role by investigating job crafting components as distinct dimensions. As such, it gives practitioners a clearer understanding of which behaviors they should seek to cultivate for employees to potentiate their home role through aspects of their job.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Norberth Okros and Delia Virga

Based on the socially embedded model of thriving at work and using the conservation of resources and job demands-resources theories, this study aims to examine the mediating role…

1489

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the socially embedded model of thriving at work and using the conservation of resources and job demands-resources theories, this study aims to examine the mediating role of thriving at work, as a personal resource, in the relationship between workplace safety, as job resource, and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used structural equation modeling to test the mediation model on a sample of 350 correctional officers.

Findings

The results provided support to the authors' model. The authors found that workplace safety is positively linked to job satisfaction and negatively to health complaints, and these relationships are partially mediated by thriving at work. Consistent with the conservation of resources theory, thriving at the workplace is a mechanism that translates the positive effect of workplace safety on well-being.

Originality/value

The contribution of this research resides that a safe work environment leads to improved health and job satisfaction via thriving at work because thriving correctional officers feel energetic and able to acquire and apply knowledge and skills at workplace.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Daria Lupsa, Loreni Baciu and Delia Virga

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and…

1262

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and organizational justice (distributive and procedural), as a contextual resource, in enhancing health through work engagement. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 193 Romanian social workers (87.60 percent women) from the national network was used to test two structural models.

Findings

Structural equation modeling analysis revealed that work engagement partially mediates the relationship between PsyCap and health, and work engagement totally mediates the relationship between organizational justice and health.

Research limitations/implications

The results emphasize the role of resources, PsyCap and organizational justice, in protecting the social workers’ health.

Practical implications

These findings support the necessity of combined evidence-based programs to develop social worker’s PsyCap and to maintain the optimum level of perceived organizational justice. These intervention programs can, in turn, enhance the work engagement and protect the health of employees in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study indicates a novel conceptual model that has two simultaneous predictors of work engagement and health. It provides insights into how contextual resources (organizational justice) potentiate the effect of personal resources (PsyCap) in enhancing health.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Delia Vîrga and Andrei Rusu

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role played by core self-evaluations (CSEs) in relationship to both job seekers’ job search behaviour and health complaints by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role played by core self-evaluations (CSEs) in relationship to both job seekers’ job search behaviour and health complaints by examining the mediating role of job search self-efficacy (JSSE).

Design/methodology/approach

The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 216 Romanian unemployed persons. The hypothetical and alternative models (partial and full mediation) were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results supported a total mediation between CSE and job search behaviour and a partial one in relationship with health complaints, via JSSE. As a post hoc decision, a brief meta-analysis was conducted for the relationship between CSE and job search behaviour which revealed a very small effect (r=0.07, p=0.001). This result complemented and certified the findings on the lack of a total and also a direct effect between CSE and job search behaviour.

Originality/value

JSSE seems to be an important motivational factor. Fuelled by CSE, JSSE enables proper job search behaviour and also promotes job seekers’ health. From a practical point of view, the data suggest that developing interventions to strengthen unemployed individuals’ personal resources such as CSE and, especially JSSE, could not only foster their employment but could also protect their health.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Zselyke Pap, Luca Tisu and Delia Vîrgă

Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) theory, this study aims to identify person-contingent antecedents and consequences of proactive strength-oriented behaviors at work…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) theory, this study aims to identify person-contingent antecedents and consequences of proactive strength-oriented behaviors at work. Thus, the authors propose and test a model in which psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, represents a precursor of strengths use, which in turn is a facilitator of employees' self-rated performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the hypothesized mediation process through a cross-lagged study with three waves, using data collected from a sample of Romanian employees. The authors analyzed the data through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results provided support for our model. The data showed significant, positive cross-lagged relationships between PsyCap, strengths use and performance across waves. Also, the authors identified a significant and positive indirect effect between PsyCap at T1 and performance at T3 through increased strengths use at T2.

Originality/value

This research brings new evidence for strengths use's placement as a proactive individual strategy within the JD-R theory. Practical implications are related to career self-management and work from home.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Smaranda Boroş and Delia Vîrgă

This paper aims to enhance clarity for the conceptualization and measurement of group emotional awareness by defining it as an emergent state. The authors explore the emergence of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enhance clarity for the conceptualization and measurement of group emotional awareness by defining it as an emergent state. The authors explore the emergence of this state through two studies designed to explore the four characteristics (global, radically novel, coherent and ostensive) of emergent phenomena (Waller et al., 2016).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors explore in an experimental setting the formation of group emotional awareness and regulation as emergent states as a result of compositional effects (team members’ self-perceptions of their individual emotional awareness capabilities) and group norms regarding emotional awareness. Study 2 uses an experimental design to explore how pre-existing expectations of group emotional awareness, based on previous dyadic interactions between team members, can prevent conflict escalation (from task to relationship conflict) in project teams.

Findings

Individual perceptions of members’ own abilities and group norms interact in the emergence of group emotional awareness. Group emotion regulation can develop only under an optimal level of emergent group emotional awareness; groups that build emotional awareness norms compensate for their members’ low awareness and develop equally efficient regulatory strategies as groups formed of emotionally aware individuals. However, the conjunction of personal propensity towards awareness and explicit awareness norms blocks the development of regulatory strategies. Group emotional awareness (both as a developed state and as an expectation) reduces the escalation of task to relationship conflict.

Originality/value

Designing for the exploration of the four characteristics of emergence allowed us to gain new insights about how group emotional awareness emerges and operates too much awareness can hurt, and affective group expectations have the power to shape reality. These findings have strong implications for practitioners’ training of emotional awareness in organizations.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Zselyke Pap, Delia Vîrgă, Guy Notelaers and Laurențiu Maricuțoiu

The purpose of this current study was to investigate the moderating effect of autonomy (individual-level job resource) and social supportive climate (group-level job resource) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this current study was to investigate the moderating effect of autonomy (individual-level job resource) and social supportive climate (group-level job resource) on the negative relationship between job insecurity and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were gathered and analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling from 3,812 participants nested in 116 work units.

Findings

A significant interaction between job insecurity and autonomy offered support for the buffering hypothesis of autonomy. Hypotheses regarding both the direct and the buffering effect of social supportive climate were also supported, suggesting that shared perceptions of a supportive environment can reduce the negative impact of job insecurity on work engagement.

Practical implications

Focus on unit climate can aid practitioners in designing interventions that take into account the effects, and make use of resources that are shared in the work-group.

Originality/value

This study extends the job demands-resources theory, showing that resources exist not only at the level of the individual but also a group-level phenomenon, and interact with demands across levels.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Coralia Sulea, Delia Virga, Laurentiu P. Maricutoiu, Wilmar Schaufeli, Catalina Zaborila Dumitru and Florin A. Sava

This study is based on the JD‐R model and aims at understanding the role of work engagement (WE) as a mediator between job resources (i.e. perceived organizational support) and…

6221

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on the JD‐R model and aims at understanding the role of work engagement (WE) as a mediator between job resources (i.e. perceived organizational support) and positive extra‐role behaviors (i.e. organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB)), between job demands (i.e. interpersonal conflicts at work) and negative extra‐role behaviors (i.e. counterproductive work behaviors (CWB)), and also between a personal resource (i.e. conscientiousness) and both types of extra‐role behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from three Romanian organizations (n=258) were collected in a cross‐sectional study. Two main models (fully mediated and partially mediated) tested the role of WE as a mediator, using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results support the partially mediated model. All anticipated antecedents have a direct, and also an indirect relation with extra‐role behaviors – via WE. In addition, the mediating effect was stronger for OCB than for CWB. Overall, the results show that job and personal characteristics differentially predict OCB and CWB, and that employees' affective‐motivational state explains, in part, these job and personal characteristics – extra‐role behaviors associations.

Originality/value

The paper advances the knowledge about the JD‐R model and its relevance for OCB and CWB. In addition, understanding work engagement's potential to stimulate OCB and inhibit CWB can aid professionals to advance beneficial behavioral outcomes in organizations by promoting wellbeing at work, thereby supporting the employees' healthy career development.

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